Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Antrophogenic transformation of the terrestrial biosphere

Sunday, October 7th, 2012

[Editor's note: The new "anthropocene" age has been detailed by the likes of The Economist, National Geographic Magazine,  The New York Times, and Wired. While much has been made of miles of road and general interconnected transportation network,  population density, and other measures,  I'm most captivated by this newish map showing "years of intensive use". Get your Jared Diamond out and study this map. Thanks Hugo! More maps at Ecotope, thanks Andrew!]

Perhaps the most obvious mark we’ve made to the planet is in land-use changes. For millennia, humans have chopped down forests and moved rock and soil for agriculture and pastureland—and more recently, for construction.

Antrophogenic transformation of the terrestrial biosphere

CREDIT: ERLE ELLIS, ADAPTED FROM E. ELLIS, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A, 369:1010 (2011) From the Science article “A global perspective on the anthropocene” DOI: 10.1126/science.334.6052.34

2012 Mountain Cartography Workshop presentations from New Zealand

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

The 8th ICA Mountain Cartography Workshop was held in Tongariro National Park, New Zealand (map) during 1-5 September 2012. A couple dozen participants gathered to talk about maps, mountains & enjoy outdoor recreation. Martin, Tom, and I joined from the United States and other participants ranged from Argentina to Norway and the usual contingent from Switzerland and Austria. We had wonderful hosts in New Zealand organizing committee.

I’ve gathered our presentations together here as a reference, enjoy.

PDFs are linked below. Original Powerpoints over there »

Aileen Buckley: NAGI Fusion Method
Download PDF (2.6 mb) »

Benjamin Schroeter: Glacier variations – Projects at the Institute of Cartography, TU Dresden

Download PDF (22 mb) »

Martin Gamache: Cartography beyond the Planimetric
Download PDF (40 mb) »

Nathaniel V. KELSO: Cartography at Stamen Design
Download the PDF (16 mb) »

Geoff Aitken: The Tramper’s Map of the Tararua Mountain System circa 1936
Download PDF (2.7 mb) »

Dusan Petrovic: Designing photo-realistic and abstract mountain maps for a 3d mapping study
Download PDF (3.7 mb) »

Martin Gamache: Americans on Everest – 50 year anniversary, mapping with the iPad
Download PDF (28 mb) »

Roger Wheate: Visualization of changes in the alpine glaciers in western Canada
Download PDF (8 mb) »

Lorenz Hurni: Glacier DEM reconstruction based on historical maps: A semi-automated approach
Download PDF (5.6 mb) »

Sebastian Vivero: A new digital terrain model for the Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, using digital photogrammetry techniques.
Download PDF (2.7 mb) »

Karel Kriz: User interaction and design issues for the Tyrolean AWC Portal
Download PDF (1.8 mb) »

Stefan Raeber: Panoramic Maps – Evaluating the usability and effectiveness
Download PDF (2.8 mb) »

Karel Kriz: Decomposing an exhibition map
Download PDF (1.4 mb) »

Roger Smith: Texture maps with Photoshop
Download PDF (1.9 mb) »

Georg Gartner: Putting emotions in maps – Towards supporting wayfinding
Download PDF (2.7 mb) »

Karel Kriz: Needs, concepts and realization of a mountain compliant smartphone app
Download PDF (2.5 mb) »

Antoni Moore: Multi-modal exploration of rugged digital terrain on mobile devices
Download PDF (0.5 mb) »

Martin Gamache: Relief approaches at National Geographic Magazine
Download PDF (70 mb) »

Roger Smith: Maps & geomorphology
Download PDF (8.8 mb) »

Geoff Aitken: New topographic mapping
Download PDF (2 mb) »

Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso: Create your own terrain maps
Download PDF (12 mb) »

Tom Patterson: Mountains unseen – Developing a relief map of the Hawaiian seafloor
Download PDF (5.7 mb) »

Martin Gamache: Yosemite National Park and El Capitan
Download PDF (7 mb) »

Martin Gamache: Animation of projections used in the National Geographic Mapping the Oceans supplement
(view video above)

Andrew Steffert: Lidar flood mapping
Download PDF (32 mb) »

VPRO: Custom Cartography and The Netherlands From Above (Stamen)

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

[Editor's note: My first big project at Stamen is live! Team includes: Geraldine, Eric, Mike, Shawn, Sean, and Zach with Jasper and Frederik at VPRO providing the data. Pretty labels powered by Dymo in zooms 7 to 10, open source auto label power!]

Republished from Stamen.

Working closely with Dutch broadcasting heavies VPRO, yesterday we launched Nederland van Boven (“Netherlands from Above”), an interactive map of the Netherlands to accompany the forthcoming broadcast of a series of shows about this fascinating tiny country. As my friend Ben Cerveny is known to say: “New York started gentrifying in the 1970s, but Amsterdam started gentrifying in the 1790s,” and the opportunity to design custom maps for a country that’s essentially all infrastructure was one that we leapt at gladly.

The show runs in a series of episodes starting later this month, each addressing a different aspect of life in Holland. It starts with mobility, answering questions like “where can I live, if I work in Amsterdam and want to be able to finish the newspaper by the time I get to work on the train?” or “How far can I travel in two hours by public transport from Vlissingen?”

Upcoming episodes will deal with other ways of looking at the environment around you: examining the natural environment by comparing distances from buildings, open space, and the density of wild animals, the landscape of danger by examining rates of lightning strikes, flammable locations and the arrival times of ambulances, and the contours of the air around the country, looking at the density of birds, flght paths of planes and the highest places in the Netherlands.

The cartography for the project is custom-made for VPRO, designed to complement the channel’s rich visual branding. Cities fill in based on a custom compilation we derived using a combination of NaturalEarthData and GeoNames sources, and and at lower zoom levels roads become visible and are drawn using data sourced from OpenStreetMap. On the most detailed zoom all roads are drawn and the arterial streets receive names. With roads come more place labels, now from OpenStreetMap and sized by population. Water bodies (black) are drawn using data from VPRO, as are park lands (black stipple pattern), airports, farm locations, pancake restaurants, neighborhood names, and zipcode shapes (the locations of pancake restaurants being as important to the Dutch as the locations of airports and farms, apparently).

The highlight layers are orange, because that’s the national color of the Netherlands. Also, did you know that carrots are orange because that’s the national color of the Netherlands; “in the 17th century, Dutch growers are thought to have cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange – who led the the struggle for Dutch independence.” So: orange maps over custom OpenStreetMap cartography, a client who wanted to tell a story and was willing to stretch what it means to design a map, and a country made of canals and land claimed from the sea. Hoera!

Technical bits:

We used open source software, some authored by Stamen, to draw the reference cartography and cache the data files. Web maps are made of small, 256 px by 256 px images, stacked next to each other in a grid and displayed in the browser as a slippy map, allowing the user to pan and zoom. The application logic in Flash allows us to speedily update the map (using the GPU) when the data filters are adjusted. Software utilized includes TileStache, Cascadenik, Dymo, ModestMaps, Mapnik, QGIS, OGR, and GDAL. Much of the data provided by VPRO was generated in ArcGIS in-house and and partners. The place search is powered by the Yahoo! geocoder.

Interact with project »

7 Billion People in Kinetic Typography

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

Very cool motion graphic promo for National Geographic’s new year-long series, via Kat and seen at BrainPickings.

MapQuest Opens Up, Embraces OpenStreetMap

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

mq_oxford

osm_oxford

[Editor's note: MapQuest made a rare splash earlier this month when it announced it would begin using  OpenStreetMap data in some products. View State of the Map presentation at SlideShare. Images above from separate post showing top the new MapQuest styling of OpenStreetMap data and below the default OSM style. Thanks Katie!]

Republished from MapQuest.

AOL’s MapQuest announced today, at the 4th annual international State of the Map 2010 conference, their plan to be the first major mapping site to embrace and encourage open source mapping at scale.  As part of this initiative, MapQuest just launched their first site that is completely powered by open source data from OpenStreetMap.org!

This new project – open.mapquest.co.uk – was developed using the new MapQuest.com design but using data provided by the OpenStreetMap community.  The main difference between this new site and our existing MapQuest UK site is that the mapping and routing data was created, edited and enhanced by every day people like you.  OpenStreetMap was designed to give the local community the ability to update areas (roads, parks, hiking trails, bike paths, points of interest, etc) that they know in their own neighborhood and around the world, ultimately leading to what we believe will be the best and most accurate mapping experience for all.

AOL also announced today, a $1 million open-source mapping investment fund.  This fund will support the growth of open-source mapping in the United States in the local communities that Patch.com covers.  More information about the AOL grant application process is available by emailing osm@mapquest.com.

Continue reading at MapQuest . . .

Deep simplicity: A personal graphics Manifesto (Alberto Cairo)

Wednesday, July 7th, 2010

raivap

[Editor's note: Alberto Cairo picks up where he left off in March, further defining what he calls "Deep simplicity" and why news infographics should use it to counter the trend of complex visualizations that are more data explorations (dumps) rather than distilled presentations. "Unless you belong to the small community of specialists they are aimed at," you won't get those complex visualizations. Instead focus on sharing the "why" and "how" with less of the raw "what".]

Republished from Visualopolis.

Last week I was working on a science infographic for Época with the help of my colleague Gerson Mora (3D guru) when I went back to the idea I’ve been thinking about for the past few months, and that you can see outlined in the previous article: is it possible to create graphics that are simple and deep at the same time? If it is, they probably are the ones that news magazine readers appreciate the most.

This is the graphic we worked on for a couple of days. Simple, isn’t it? Just four white 3D Poser-like heads that display different levels of anger. The story this graphic was published with deals with the outbursts of rage that many soccer players are showing during the South Africa World Cup. We wanted to explain what happens in your brain when that negative emotion overrules your conscious mecanisms, making you lose control. And why it happens. [...]

This piece illustrates a fancy concept Ive been thinking about for future articles and books: deep simplicity. There’s a book under the same name by John Gribbin, but it has nothing to do with graphics (it’s about chaos theory and complexity). There’s also a little masterpiece by John Maeda that promotes something similar to what I propose, but applied to design in general, and in a more abstract level. I confess that some of Maeda’s ideas permeate my own reflections heavily. [...]

What does deep simplicity mean, anyway?

Continue reading at Visualopolis . . .

Top World Cup Players on Facebook, Day by Day (NY Times)

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

screen-shot-2010-07-05-at-43009-pm

[Editor's note: Kudos to Sean Carter and the New York Times graphics team. Most of these types of visualizations are done using Twitter's API, unique for Facebook? My only wish is for the timeline to have a play button.]

Republished from the New York Times.

Millions of people around the world have been actively supporting – or complaining about – their favorite teams and players. Below, players are sized according to the number of mentions on Facebook during each day of the World Cup.

Interact with the original at the New York Times . . .

“A super sophisticated mashup”: The semantic web’s promise and peril (Nieman Lab)

Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010

[Editor's note: Journalism, and the web in general, is finally catching up to GIScience and the transition from static paper maps to rich, digital maps that included data attributes (rather than graphically encoded attributes) and, more importantly, linking attributes. From Nieman Report's latest issue focusing on digital journalism.]

Republished from Nieman Journalism Lab.
By Andrew Finlayson
. June 17

In the movie Terminator, humanity started down the path to destruction when a supercomputer called Skynet started to become smarter on its own. I was reminded of that possibility during my research about the semantic web.

Never heard of the semantic web? I don’t blame you. Much of it is still in the lab, the plaything of academics and computer scientists. To hear some of them debate it, the semantic web will evolve, like Skynet, into an all powerful thing that can help us understand our world or create various crises when it starts to develop a form of connected intelligence.

Intrigued? I was. Particularly when I asked computer scientists about how this concept could change journalism in the next five years. The true believers say the semantic web could help journalists report complex ever-changing stories and reach new audiences. The critics doubt the semantic web will be anything but a high-tech fantasy. But even some of the doubters are willing to speculate that computers using pieces of the semantic Web will increasingly report much of the news in the not too distant future.

Continue reading at Nieman Reports . . .

Map album art covers from Left of the Dial: Dispatches from the ’80s Underground box set

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

fe3c6230a8a013bd63f9f010lSaw these at a friend’s birthday party last weekend. Fanciful geographies from a collage of old school print maps form the covers of the 4 CDs in the Left of the Dial box set. The first shows San Francisco, California, on the left and Boston, Mass., on the right with Manchester, UK, at top with a London inset.

21c1828fd7a01836a9c30110l

375e828fd7a07836a9c30110l

d004828fd7a03836a9c30110l

a400828fd7a05836a9c30110l

Best Jobs in America (Focus)

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

best_jobs_in_america

[Editor's note: Cross indexed infographic based on pay, economic sector, sex, ethnicity, and selected interest areas (like benefits to society). Systems Engineer at the top. Data slightly out of date (women have overtaken men in workplace). Seen via @VizWorld via @GeoEntelechy.]

Republished from Focus mag.

View full size version . . .