Archive for the ‘Charting’ Category

Sweden’s Acme Advertising creates arresting green motorcoach marketing (Acne Advertising)

Monday, February 1st, 2010

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[Editor’s note: Video (below) showing creation of a 3d art installation showing how 50 cars = 1 bus for CO2 emissions in Sweden. Thanks @jnack!]

Republished from Acne Advertising and AutoBlog.

Sweden’s Flygbussarna Airport Coaches asked Acne Advertising to make the case for travelers to take a coach to the airport instead of a car. Instead of leading with price, comfort, or ease, Acne went for hot air and green – as in CO2 and the environment.

To vividly illustrate that one Flyggbussarna coach can hold about 50 people – as opposed to the typical Swedish passenger car, which averages 1.2 occupants – while emitting the pollution of just four passenger cars, Acne built a coach out of fifty crushed cars – primarily expired Volvos and Saabs.

The installation was placed next to the road to Sweden’s largest airport, and what ensued was lots of public awareness. And traffic jams. Which would have increased CO2, ironically. Follow the jump for a video on the campaign. Even if the resultant congestion made the earth a bit warmer, it’s still very cool.

50 cars or 1 coach? from acneadvertising on Vimeo.

Who Supports Health Care Reform (NY Times)

Friday, January 29th, 2010

[Editor’s note: Op-Art from the New York Times showing who (which states) supports and opposes health care reform grouped by age and income. Data from 2004, so not current but still informative. Thanks Martin!]

Republished from the New York Times. Nov. 18, 2009.

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Home Prices in Selected Cities, Through October 2009 (NY Times)

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

[Editor's note: Year-over price difference in 30 cities across the United States as an interactive chart.]

Republished from the New York Times.

Interact with the original . . . (Screenshot below)

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. Source: S&P/Case-Shiller

Industrial-Strength Carbon Footprints (NY Times)

Thursday, December 31st, 2009

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[Editor's note: Carbon dioxide emissions charted by ton, economic sector, and revenue.]

Republished from the New York Times. Dec. 28, 2009.

Emissions Disclosure as a Business Virtue

Cupping their hands near holes drilled for cable routing, workers at the Boeing Company’s four-acre data processing site near Seattle noticed this year that air used to keep the computers cool was seeping through floor openings.

Mindful of the company’s drive to slash electricity consumption by 25 percent, they tucked insulation into holes there and at five similar sites. The resulting savings are projected at $55,000, or some 685,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year.

Yet Boeing’s goal is not just to save money. The hope is to keep pace with other companies that have joined in a vast global experiment in tracking the carbon dioxide emissions generated by industry.

Boeing and other enterprises are voluntarily doing what some might fiercely resist being forced to do: submitting detailed reports on how much they emit, largely through fossil fuel consumption, to a central clearinghouse.

The information flows to the Carbon Disclosure Project, a small nonprofit organization based in London that sifts through the numbers and generates snapshots by industry sectors in different nations.

By giving enterprises a road map for measuring their emissions and pointing out how they compare with their peers, experts say, the voluntary project is persuading companies to change their energy practices well before many governments step in to regulate emissions.

Scientists estimate that industry and energy providers produce nearly 45 percent of the heat-trapping emissions that contribute to global warming. While some governments are convinced that reining in such pollution is crucial to protecting the atmosphere, a binding global pact is not on the immediate horizon, as negotiations in Copenhagen showed this month.

Until broad regulation is at hand, many investors and company executives say, voluntary reporting programs like the Carbon Disclosure Project may be the best way to leverage market forces for change.

Continue reading at the New York Times . . .

How Different Groups Spend Their Day (NY Times)

Monday, December 28th, 2009

[Editor's note: I missed this interactive from The New York Times over the summer. "Sleeping, eating, working, and watching TV takes up about two-thirds of the average day." Delve into the chart by isolating either by activity or by groupings of survey participants. Roll over the chart with your mouse to discover the percentage numbers by time.]

Republished from the New York Times. July 31, 2009.

The American Time Use Survey asks thousands of American residents to recall every minute of a day. Here is how people over age 15 spent their time in 2008. Related article
Interact with the original at the New York Times . . .
(Screenshot below) By By SHAN CARTER, AMANDA COX, KEVIN QUEALY and AMY SCHOENFELD.
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Introducing In Obama’s Words (Kelso via Wash Post)

Thursday, December 17th, 2009

[Editor’s note: The third in The Washington Post’s Obama accountability series, we now explore his key speeches with transcripts and videos tied in with their POTUS Tracker events. See trends in sum or by issue with our tag clouds and over time with charts. Credit goes to Wilson Andrews, Jackie Kazil, Nathaniel Kelso, Sarah Lovenheim, Ryan O’Neil, Paul Volpe, and Karen Yourish.]

Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . . Screenshot below.

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What’s Cooking on Thanksgiving (NY Times)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

[Editor’s note: This series of small choropleth interactive maps from Matthew Ericson and Amanda Cox back on Thanksgiving day show regional patterns of what Americas are eating where. One holiday down, another to go. Thanks Kristin and Martin!]

Republished from the New York Times.

As cooks turn to the Web for Thanksgiving recipes, the terms they enter into search engines can provide clues to what dishes are being cooked around the nation. On Wednesday on Allrecipes.com, “sweet potato casserole” was by far the most common search term nationwide. It was tops in 36 of the 50 states and easily outpaced the No. 2 entry, “pumpkin pie.” |Related Article »


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Affordable Housing Mashup (Envisioning Development)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Google mashup with fun charting trying to make sense out of simple yet complicated subject.]

Republished from EnvisioningDevelopment.net.

“Affordable Housing.” The phrase seems plain enough, but it doesn’t always mean what people think it does! It actually has a technical government definition that can determine what gets built and who lives there. Use these tools to answer the all-important question: “Affordable to whom?

What Is Affordable Housing? from the Center for Urban Pedagogy on Vimeo.

A stop-action animation on the technical definitions of affordable housing — by Rosten Woo and John Mangin of CUP, animator/designer Jeff Lai, and Glen Cummings of MTWTF. Narrated by Lisa Burriss. Sound by Rosten Woo.

Tag Cloud: In their own words (Wash Post)

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

[Editor's note: I created these three tag clouds to represent the responses to a national poll conducted for The Washington Post. Respondents chose 1 word to represent the Republican party. The words are all on the same type size scale in each of the 3 clouds. The position of the same words also needed to be consistent between clouds (ie: Palin in the upper left). Obviously the Republicans are on message about being conservative. Created with a custom script in Illustrator. Arranged by hand.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Nov. 30, 2009.

Those taking the poll were asked what word or phrase they would use to describe the Republican Party. The chart below shows all responses cited by two or more people, sized by number of responses.

View larger original at The Washington Post.

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50 States and 50 Metros (fake is the new real)

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Fascinating look at the cultural geography of the United States sorted by large cities and subtracted from the 50 states. For instance, considered as metros, New York city, Los Angeles, and Chicago are larger in population than the non-metropolitan portions of Texas, California, North Carolina, Florida, and Pa. The author has another good post on subway systems around the world all scaled to the same size. Thanks Jo!]

Republished from fake is the new real.
By Neil Freeman, artist and urban planner.

The fifty largest metro areas (in blue), disaggregated from their states (in orange). Each has been scaled and sorted according to population. The metro areas are US-Census defined CBSAs and MSAs.

Small sampling below. Click on image for all 100 shapes.

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