MAP: Track Swine Flu Cases (Kelso via Wash Post)

[Editor's note: This is my mashup for The Washington Post tracking the H1N1 swine flu outbreak. It is custom built using the Google Maps for Flash API. Reporting is by Washington Post staff and is updated several times each day. Zoom in and out of the map to see more detail and different symbolization approaches.]

Screenshots below:

Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

Use our interactive mashup to track the distribution of swine flu (H1N1) cases around the world. Click on the map markers to learn more about cases at each location. 

SOURCES: Staff reports; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and World Health Organization. Interactive by Nathaniel V. Kelso; Research by Madonna Lebling, Robert Thomason, Mary Kate Cannistra and April Umminger – The Washington Post. First published April 27, 2009 at 10 p.m.

World Map of Swine Flu Outbreak

World Map of Swine Flu Outbreak

World Map of Swine Flu Outbreak

Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

7 Responses to “MAP: Track Swine Flu Cases (Kelso via Wash Post)”

  1. Melissa says:

    Ugh, gruesome subject but very nicely (and quickly) done! Love how the numbers update with the view changes.

  2. [...] [Editor's note: The age-old rule for cloropleth mapping that suggests aggregation by multi-scale areal units based on the map's zoom level is slowly seeping into "clustering" for the point-based mashup geo community. This overview from Travellr published on the Google GeoDevelopers blog includes two illustrations that show the power of this technique. I used such a technique (different implementation) on The Washington Post's recent swine flu mapping.] [...]

  3. [...] [Editor's note: The age-old rule for cloropleth mapping that suggests aggregation by multi-scale areal units based on the map's zoom level is slowly seeping into "clustering" for the point-based mashup geo community. This overview from Travellr published on the Google GeoDevelopers blog includes two illustrations that show the power of this technique. I used such a technique (different implementation) on The Washington Post's recent swine flu mapping.] [...]

  4. the spread of AH1N1 or Swine Flu is really scary. It is a good thing that this virus is not very deadly. We are advised to take Vitamin-C and to wear face masks.

  5. the use of face masks and boosting your immune system by taking lots of vitamin-C is still an effective way of preventing the spread of the Swine Flu virus.

  6. i always advice my kids to wear face masks when going into crowded areas. swine flu is really scary and i dont want my kids getting infected by it.

  7. I have a relative who got the Swine Flu in Mexico. It is a good thing that he already recovered from this disease.