Posts Tagged ‘3d’

Conference Announcement: 1st ICA Symposium “True-3D in Cartography”

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

Please note that the deadline for abstract submission for the 1st International ICA/DGfK Symposium “True-3D in Cartography” which will be held at Dreikönigskirche Conference Centre, Dresden, 24-28  August 2009, has been extended until 31 March 2009.

Below you find the list of envisaged topics:

  • Anaglyph Displays
  • Animated True 3D
  • CAVEs
  • Chromo-Stereoscopy
  • CNC Relief-Milling
  • Earth Relief Globes
  • E-Paper and True 3D
  • Hand-Made Geomodels
  • Analogue Holography
  • Digital Holography
  • Hyperglobes
  • Lenticular Foil Technology
  • Polarisation Technology
  • Relief-Molding Technology
  • Solid State Geomodels
  • Shutter Glass Technology
  • Stereo-Lithography
  • Virtual Environments
  • 3D Printing etc.

Please, find more information at the conference web site: http://kartographie.geo.tu-dresden.de/true3Dincartography09/

For any other specific information concerning the conference you can contact steffi.sharma@tu-dresden.de.
Feel free to forward this message to all colleagues who might be interested in this ICA meeting.

Looking forward to seeing you in Dresden in August 2009.

Manfred Buchroithner

Manfred Buchroithner

Also check out these two blog posts to get a feel for the type of content and people who attend this type of conference:

Meet Toni Mair — Terrain Artist Extraordinaire

2008 Mountain Cartography Confernce in Switzerland Approaches

3D Flash: Papervision + Webcam = Augmented Reality!?!

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

[Editor's note: See a digital hologram of a cute little green monster and GE Smart Grid technology come to life in your hands. This shit is crazy! You print out a black and white shape and then hold it up to your webcam and the camera in Flash picks up the angle and distance of the print-out and in real time renders, rotates, scales, etc one of two 3d "hologram" scenes on your computer screen. Thanks April!]

Some links from the BioChat blog.

Example from boffswana.com via Vimeo.
Papervision – Augmented Reality (extended)

Example from GE. Video below.
Try it yourself! (requires Flash and web cam, Mac and PC)

Vue 7 Pioneer Landscape Creation App Now Open Beta (MacNN)

Friday, December 19th, 2008

[Editor's note: Alex Tait demonstrated Vue as a 3d application cartographers should be migrating to, away from Bryce, for creating 3d map scenes at his 2008 NACIS presentation in Missoula. E-on is starting to beta test a new version.]

Republished from MacNN.

e-on software has released an open beta of Vue 7 Pioneer, an application for creating 3D landscapes. Starting with an empty screen, users can grow trees, add terrain or water, make alterations to the atmosphere, and tweak colors or materials before animating the environment. Objects can also be either created or loaded into the software, and modeled to preference.

Using the virtual camera, creators are able to move anywhere inside the scene, zoom in or out, and change lens type to obtain a desired shot. Vue 7 Pioneer is available for free from the company website; any modules purchased for the open beta should work with the final release.

Our city in 3D (Google Lat-Long Blog)

Friday, July 18th, 2008

 [Editor's note: Local interest to DC but promising in sharing of public GIS data.]

Reprinted from the Google Lat-Long Blog. Published: July 16, 2008

The District of Columbia government has submitted more than 84,000 3D models to Google Earth via the Cities in 3D program. But why would a city, let alone one that is known as a horizontal city because of a strictly enforced height limit, be so eager to participate? Here’s a glimpse into our thinking in the District’s GIS department.

1. It is the right thing to do. Fundamentally, the District Government believes that data created with public funds should be available to the public. Making this data now available via Google Earth is an important step in making our data truly accessible to the public at large.

2. Because every neighborhood can benefit from 3D. Instead of modeling just a select few landmarks in exquisite detail, we wanted to model every building in every neighborhood. Economic development was a primary driver behind development of the dataset. The buildings provide the context in which to plan and debate proposed new developments. Despite our aforementioned reputation as a horizontal city, we are also a city of spires, penthouses and domes, as you can now see. As public sector mappers, we put the entire city on Google Earth, not just downtown, because every neighborhood needs planning and development. We hope that the private sector will follow suit and create rich 3D models of proposed developments as KML downloads in the future.

3. We get better 3D performance from the cloud and we don’t pay for it. Some GIS users in the DC government, have made excellent use of the data, but with the city’s current technology, the 3D data had to be used locally on high-end desktops. Frankly, the District did not have the technical capabilities for distributing nearly 100,000 3D building across the enterprise. With the data now hosted on Google Earth 4.3, we expect DC Government users to turn to Google Earth just like the public. And using the same tools as our citizens is another powerful way to connect with them and ensure the quality of their experience.

4. We want to communicate with our residents. It is important to us that citizens, particularly DC taxpayers, understand what we do. We posted the “coolest” data set DC GIS has, because now that we have your attention we want to show you all of the other stuff we do. As part of Mayor Adrian Fenty’s drive for transparency, the DC government now makes more than 200 geospatial data sets publically available. So admire the thousands of 3D buildings, but also extend your virtual tour. You can add these datasets as layers on Google Earth, and view things like wards, trails, parks, museums, building permits, fire hydrants, zoning and even things the city isn’t proud of, like calls for rodent abatement.

Measuring Informational Distance Between Cities

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

The folks over at bestiario.org have posted a curious visualization showing the “google” distance between pairs of cities around the globe, nicely visualized in rotatable 3d. What is “google” distance? From their website:

This tridimensional scheme represents the strength of relations between cities from searches on Google. The main idea is to compare the number of pages on the internet where the two cities appear close to each other, with the number of pages they appear isolated. This proportion indicates some kind of intensity of relation between the cities. After measuring this “google proximity” we divide it by its geographical distance. By this process we obtain an indicator about the strength of relation in spite of the real distance, a kind of informational distance between cities.  

They call that measure the google-platonic distance between cities, which is explained further on their page…

Here a partial visualization (image below). Click on the image to launch their tool, see examples, and spin the globe. The visualization could be helped by showing it on a real sphere, but the linearized sphere no doubt spins quicker. Thanks Curt!

google informational distance