Posts Tagged ‘amusement’

You’ve seen one block, you’ve seen them all

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

beach

Ever look close, I mean real close at the imagery you seen in Google Earth and other online map providers? You’ll notice most of it, in the United States at least, comes from the USGS or USDA Farm Service Agency. But have you noticed they sometimes doctor the imagery to remove clouds or other collection artifacts? Well, look at the above image again ;) Here’s the Gmaps view in Tybee Island, GA. Thanks Andrew and Geoff!

The Google Map Envelope (Unplggd)

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

[Editor's note: Netflix can't save the USPS alone! Use a Google Maps map envelope to update your grandparents and save snail mail! Thanks Sebastian.]

Republished from Unplgged.

It seems like 99 percent of the mail we send is electronic these days. The other 1 percent is letters and postcards that we want to postmark with our (usually enviable) location for the recipient. That’s why we dig these uber-accurate Google Maps envelopes. Now we can say Hello from 100 Holomoana Street, Honolulu, HI, 96815!

Gravity Wells (xkcd)

Thursday, January 14th, 2010

[Editor's note: Science comic geek alert. Thanks Martin and Jo!]

Republished from XKCD: A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.

View larger version . . .

gravity_wells

Analyze this, Tufte! Movie Narrative Charts (XKCD comic)

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

movie_narrative_charts

[Editor's note: Thanks Jo!]

Republished from XKCD.

These charts show movie character interactions. The horizontal axis is time. The vertical groupings of the lines indicates which characters are together at a given time. On the LoTRs up and down roughly correspond to northwest and southeast.

View larger, legible version at XKCD . . .

Periodic Table of Typefaces (Behance)

Friday, March 13th, 2009

[Editor's note: View 100 of the most popular, influential, and notorious typefaces (fonts) arranged in a Periodic Table for quick reference and amusement. Thanks Lynda!]

Republished from Behance Network.
Click image above for larger view.

The Periodic Table of Typefaces is obviously in the style of all the thousands of over-sized Periodic Table of Elements posters hanging in schools and homes around the world.  This particular table lists 100 of the most popular, influential and notorious typefaces today.

As with traditional periodic tables, this table presents the subject matter grouped categorically.  The Table of Typefaces groups by families and classes of typefaces:  sans-serif, serif, script, blackletter, glyphic, display, grotesque, realist, didone, garalde, geometric, humanist, slab-serif and mixed.

Each cell of the table lists the typeface and a one or two character “symbol” (made up by me simply based on logic), the designer, year designed and a ranking of 1 through 100.

Ranking was determined by statistically sorting and combining lists and opinions from the the sites listed below.  The final overall ranking was achieved depending on how many lists the particular typeface was presented on and it’s ranking on the lists (if the particular source list used a ranking system; some did not, in which case just the typeface’s presence on the list boosted it’s overall score.)  After averaging the typefaces appearances and rankings a composite score was given and the list was sorted on a spreadsheet then finally given an overall score of 1 through 100 based on its final resting position.

Continue reading at Behance Network . . .

(below) Detail from the Periodic Table of Typefaces.

Comic: Converting to Metric (XKCD)

Tuesday, January 6th, 2009

[Editor's note: Helpful hints on how to go metric if you never had a science class in the US since the 1970s. I don't yet dream in metric but I ain't afraid of it ;) Thanks Jo!] 

Republished from XKCD: A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.

The key to converting to metric is establishing new reference points. When you hear “26° C,” instead of thinking “that’s 79° F” you should think, “That’s warmer than a house but cool for swimming.” Here are some helpful tables of reference points:


View larger size.