Posts Tagged ‘animation’

Affordable Housing Mashup (Envisioning Development)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

wholiveshere

[Editor's note: Google mashup with fun charting trying to make sense out of simple yet complicated subject.]

Republished from EnvisioningDevelopment.net.

“Affordable Housing.” The phrase seems plain enough, but it doesn’t always mean what people think it does! It actually has a technical government definition that can determine what gets built and who lives there. Use these tools to answer the all-important question: “Affordable to whom?

What Is Affordable Housing? from the Center for Urban Pedagogy on Vimeo.

A stop-action animation on the technical definitions of affordable housing — by Rosten Woo and John Mangin of CUP, animator/designer Jeff Lai, and Glen Cummings of MTWTF. Narrated by Lisa Burriss. Sound by Rosten Woo.

Scientific Visualizations from Hillside Pictures, CA

Monday, August 3rd, 2009

lidarvegremoval

(above) Vegetation Removal: Removing vegetation from a LiDAR dataset reveals the highly detailed bare-earth topography.

lidar3d

(above) Gabilan Mesa: Landscape renderings based on high resolution LiDAR data for Gabilan Mesa, an old erosional surface featuring gently sloping plateaus strongly aligned with each other along the eastern side of the Salinas Valley, CA.

[Editor's note: Scientific data visualizations and presentations using GIS data from Dorel Iordache, a northern California visual designer. Check out the videos. Thanks Sebastian!]

Republished from Hillside Pictures, Calif.

Hillside Pictures was born out of the desire to blend my lifelong passion for moving pictures and graphic design with my background in computer science and remote sensing. The results are complex visualizations of landscapes and natural environments with emphasis on both scientific accuracy and visual aesthetics. My work is grounded in broad technical expertise, highest attention to detail and years of work experience in the academic environment. Stepping outside the field of data visualization, I enjoy working on motion graphics and visual effects projects, including animated DVD menus, titles or intros.

Continue to Hillside Pictures artwork gallery . . .

World Airline Traffic Visualization (?)

Monday, December 8th, 2008

[Editor's note: Continuing my theme of traffic flow visualization (1 | 2), here's a video by FlightSuite, NHAW, Technorama, and NASA showing animated world flight patterns in a 24 hour period as colored yellow dots traveling from city to city. I'd tell you more but I can't dig up any other information about this visualization. Tufte has a neat section on this topic. Thanks Seba!]

YouTube version that is SMALL first. View larger.

Different video that is US centric:

A House of Glass (NY Times)

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

[Editor's note: This interactive in a panel based narrative highlighting the transformation of a landmark in New York City. Touches of animation and good story telling. Republished from the New York Times on Oct. 16th, 2008. Thanks Christina!]

The cascading public staircase that covers the new TKTS discount booth in Duffy Square is made almost entirely of structural-strength glass: walls, beams, treads and risers. (Related Article)

View full sized original at NYTimes.com . . .

Source: Nicholas Leahy, Perkins Eastman, Theater Development Fund

Mika Gröndahl and Xaquín G.V. / The New York Times; Photographs by Fred R. Conrad, Richard Perry, Michael Evans / The New York Times, Associated Press, Times Square Alliance

SpatialKey: insanely good geovisualization (indiemaps)

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008

[Editor's note: More on commercial Spatial Key visualization system for Flash from Zach Johson via Universal Mind.]

Reprinted from indiemaps blog on 13 Aug. 2008.

I’m [ed-Zach Johnson] a little late on this, so I hope it’s old news to most readers that Universal Mind, where I’ve worked for the past 2 months, just launched a technology preview of theSpatialKey visualization system.  This is a big deal.

Andrew PowellDoug McCune, and Brandon Purcell have already posted great introductions to SpatialKey, so I won’t go through all that here. But just so’s you know: SpatialKey is a visualization system for geotemporal (location + time) data, developed primarily in Flex, that lets you filter and render thousands of points very quickly, all client-side in your browser.

This is not a formal release. We’re in a technology preview for now, which means you just get to see some sweet examples, but soon we’ll release a version, SpatialKey Personal, into which you can load and visualize your own data. Here are links to three of my favorite examples (for more, check out our Gallery page, or this post on the SpatialKey blog).

As I said, other better introductions have been written on SpatialKey; I just want to focus on a few of my favorite features or attributes.

not a single, do-it-all application

SpatialKey is based around a collection of visualization templates. Each offers a unique view of the data, with specialized visualizations, filters, and UI controls. Since the templates are specialized, each one is pretty easy to learn and begin using.

The examples linked above demonstrate the animationmap comparison, and drill down templates. The fourth template we’re showing off now is the temporal heat index template (here’s an example of that: Sacramento residential burglaries).

chorodot symbolization

You don’t see these much, but I think they’re really effective. The “heat grid” symbolization in SpatialKey is a modern implementation of a technique put forth by Alan MacEachren and David DiBiase in 1991.

Aggregating points to arbitrary but regularly-shaped polygons, or binning, was an extant graphical practice at the time, but the geographic application and their particular methods created an effective cartographic symbology. Other than SpatialKey, I haven’t seen this symbolization in a geographic visualization context, but I think it’s very effective at presenting large datasets that require aggregation. The heat grid symbolization in SpatialKey extends the approach by allowing grid renderings of attributes of the data (like house prices or temperature) in addition to aggregation of the count of points.

chorodot of AIDS cases in Pennsylvania

MacEachran and DiBiase’s example chorodot map of AIDS in Pennsylvania (image from J.B. Krygier’s lecture notes)

grid symbology in SpatialKey, implementation of the chorodot cartographic symbology

SpatialKey grid symbolization showing a data attribute (average home prices) in Sacramento county

small multiples / map comparison

I’ve always been a fan of the small multiples depiction of change, illustrated so well by Edward Tufte in The Visual Display of Quantitative Information and Envisioning Information. Though the SpatialKey Map Comparison template shows two multiples, it qualifies (and we can easily plug in more maps for specialized templates).

D.C. construction in the SpatialKey Map Comparison template

Both the maps and the time charts are live-linked. Mousing over an area on one of the maps or a bar on one of the time charts reveals the tooltip for both displays, allowing you to easily retrieve specifics for different time periods or areas.

complex temporal filtering and focusing via the heat index chart

The time chart, shown in the first screenshot above, is great for revealing linear temporal trends in a dataset, and for enabling linear filtering. But some datasets evince more complex temporal trends — for example, some crimes may be more common on a certain day of the week and at a certain time of day. Such trends are lost when data is aggregated in a linear fashion to, say, days or weeks.

sex crime arrests in Sacramento

The temporal heat index chart reveals such complex trends and allows filtering by multiple temporal aspects simultaneously (for example, showing only prostitution arrests on Tuesdays between 3 and 4 am).

in closing

I was late to the game on this one, joining Universal Mind in June. SpatialKey was developed by the brilliant team of Doug McCune, Ben Stucki, and Andrew Powell, led by Brandon Purcell and Tom Link, with product manager Mike Connor. It’s a privilege working with such a talented crew.

Our goals for this technology preview are modest (blowing minds, getting feedback), but we’re excited to continue developing SpatialKey and SpatialKey Law Enforcement. And we’ll be releasing updates, new examples, and SpatialKey Personal in the near future. So stay tuned to the SpatialKey blog, and please contact us if you have any feedback on our technology preview.