Posts Tagged ‘api’

Top World Cup Players on Facebook, Day by Day (NY Times)

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

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[Editor's note: Kudos to Sean Carter and the New York Times graphics team. Most of these types of visualizations are done using Twitter's API, unique for Facebook? My only wish is for the timeline to have a play button.]

Republished from the New York Times.

Millions of people around the world have been actively supporting – or complaining about – their favorite teams and players. Below, players are sized according to the number of mentions on Facebook during each day of the World Cup.

Interact with the original at the New York Times . . .

Flickr Shapefiles browser (MapToPixel)

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

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[Editor's note: Also check out Aaron's WOE ID browser (the geography behind Flickr). The Flickr API returns both ESRI format shapefiles and XML / JSON. The monster dump of all Flickr shapes is just XML, however. Thanks GeoPDX!]

Republished from MapToPixel.

Flickr Shapefiles are a set of polygons generated from the geo-tags of photos on Flickr. Using the names assigned by people to their own images the dataset offers boundaries of loads of places around the world. The code.flickr blog has more info and details of their generation. The idea is that using people’s tags of locations to form boundaries gives a large dataset of where people think particular places are.

The Boundaries project uses Flick Shapefiles to show neighbourhoods and their neighbouring places. Other than that there isn’t a huge amount of examples on the web.  I’ve put together an example that uses ModestMaps and the Flickr API to display the Shapefiles in Flash. The polygons are retrieved using a bounding box query to the Flickr API, decoded from JSON, drawn and may be identified with a mouse hover.

Continue reading at MapToPixel . . .

Yahoo GeoPlanet gains more concordance with other gazetters

Tuesday, June 8th, 2010

[Editor's note: Yahoo has several nifty tools, including Placemaker, all powered off their GeoPlanet gazetteer, freshly updated in v 1.4 to include links back to other place name gazetteers and even Wikipedia articles, so we (and our machines) can know we're all talking about the same places. Flickr, for instance, stores the geographic tags on photos using GeoPlanet WOEIDs. ]

Republished from Yahoo’s Geo Blog.
By Gary Vicchi.

Back in March at the annual geo-fest that is Where 2.0 in San Jose we released our concordance API as part of Yahoo! GeoPlanet. That initial release allowed conversion between the identifier namespaces of WOEIDs, ISO 3166, FIPS, INSEE, Geonames, JGCD, IATA and ICAO.

Lots of you liked this and asked us to add support for other identifier namespaces as well.

change sign

Robert C. Gallagher once said that change is inevitable – except from a vending machine and that works in the Geo world as well. So in version 1.4 of GeoPlanet which is live right now at http://where.yahooapis.com/v1/ you’ll find additional concordance namespace support for

  • OpenStreetMap place codes
  • Wikipedia place article ids
  • UN/Locode place codes
  • Country Code Top Level Domain codes
  • FAA airport codes
  • US and CA ZIP codes

Continue reading at Yahoo . . .

Add a touch of style to your maps (Google Geo)

Friday, May 21st, 2010

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[Editor's note: Google takes a page from CloudMade's book and now allows  Maps API users to style the default map data, up to a limit. Demos at the Google link below, with live style editor with preview. Lots of opportunity to style the maps, kinda. The font still tips off the user it's Google map. Tiles are generated on the fly for the user on the Google servers, just as if the user was calling regular tiles. Dig in!]

Republished from Google Geo.

Google Maps are instantly familiar to millions of Internet users worldwide. The user interface and the look and feel of our maps combine to ensure that when a user sees a Google map on any web site, they instantly know how to interact with that map, and find their way around.

There is however an unavoidable consequence of this consistency. No matter which Maps API site you are on, every map looks the same. If you want your map to stand out from the crowd, your options are limited to customizing the markers and controls, and if your brand has a particular colour scheme that is reflected on your site, Google Maps may not sit well with it.

From today, this all changes. You are now free to unleash your creativity on the base Google map itself, as we are delighted to launch Styled Maps in the Google Maps API v3.

Styled Maps offers you control over both the types of features shown on your maps, and the color scheme used to represent them. The possibilities are endless, as the examples below show…

Continue reading at Google Geo . . .

Google Maps Elevation Web Services (Google)

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

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[Editor's note: A free, sans-API key solution from the web mapping giant for showing elevation (point or along custom path) for Google Maps Mashups either in the v3 API directly or separately as a stand-alone web service. And it returns JSON :) Thanks @lagerratrobe!]

Republished from Google.

The Google Elevation web service provides you a simple interface to query locations on the earth for elevation data. Additionally, you may request sampled elevation data along paths, allowing you to calculate elevation changes along routes.

The Elevation service provides elevation data for all locations on the surface of the earth, including depth locations on the ocean floor (which return negative values). In those cases where Google does not possess exact elevation measurements at the precise location you request, the service will interpolate and return an averaged value using the four nearest locations.

With the Elevation service, you can develop hiking and biking applications, mobile positioning applications, or low resolution surveying applications.

Check the documentation out over at Google . . .

Services, Resources and Tools for Mapping Data (Sunlight Foundation)

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

[Editor's note: Listing of several dozen free web apps and tutorials, including GeoCommons Maker!, Modest Maps, Color Brewer, Open Layers, and Batch GeoCoder.]

Republished from the Sunlight Foundation.
By Kerry Mitchell on 02/19/10

Services, Resources and Tools for Mapping DataLong ago, putting together a map of data points would be the sole domain of a skilled GIS practitioner employing an application like ArcView. These days, particularly with the advent of Google Maps, Yahoo Maps and OpenStreetMap, et al., there are a multitude of options for an individual to employ in displaying data geographically. Of course, there are, and will always be, technical options that require some level of programming chops. Fortunately, the pool of drop dead easy implementations that anyone can throw together with ease has grown a lot over the last few years. Then, there is the growing middle ground, lying somewhere between easy but rigid and difficult but flexible. Personally, I tend to hover in this netherworld, leveraging existing code, services or tutorials when possible but occasionally finding myself diving into the more technical areas when necessary and learning a lot in the process.

For those of you out there who might be interested in mapping data, I’ve put together a collection of links to a variety of services, code samples, resources and tutorials I’ve found useful in the past. These links range from new services that barely require anything more than a spreadsheet to complicated frameworks that require a great deal of technical knowledge. This is by no means all encompassing and if you happen to have additional links you’d like to share, feel free to leave them in the comments.

Continue reading at the Sunlight Foundation . . .

Introduction: Flash Google Maps API and Multi-touch

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

[Editor's note: From last year but multi-touch is still getting rolling.]

Republished from Cyna C Design Ideas blog.

There are many APIs out there to work with. If you start searching around Google, there are many people dedicated to helping people like you and me tie in different information and resources into Flash. It can take quite a long time just understanding a full API and be able to use ALL of it’s capabilities. But that idea is way down the road. If you are like me, it’s nice to find something to help you get off the ground.

Today I came across Emanuele Feronato‘s website, Italian geek and PROgrammer. He has a tutorial to get you started using the GoogleMaps API, so here is your first task in this tutorial:

1. Read Emanuele Feronato‘s tutorial and get Google Maps running in Flash.

Got it yet? Not yet? Don’t worry I took me a little while to get everything downloaded, hooked in and sorted out.

Got it now? Awesome! Set your API key and everything? Great. This tutorial I’m going to try something different. Last time, I built up to the final code step by step. This one, I’ll show you the final version of the code, and we’ll step through it. Let me know which type of tutorial you like better and in the future, I’ll try to keep a consistent style.

Continue reading at Cyna C Design . . .

The 2010 Census Road Show Uses a Mashup (aka, Fill out your form)

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

2010 Census

[Editor's note: The decennial census won't win awards for it's tag line (It's in our hands) but it is important and is taking place NOW across the United States. They PR folks employ a Google Maps mashup in Flash to real-time track the promo vehicles (the gas powered ones, not sled powered) and see the vehicles entire route (which are not optimized for fuel efficiency if the red connecting lines can be believed). Thanks Lynda!]

Republished in part from Census.gov (second).

(above) Noorvik, Alaska, January 25, 2010 — Census Bureau Director Robert Groves traveled by dog sled today and visited residents in the remote Alaskan village of Noorvik. There he met with the mayor and local leaders before a team of huskies guided him to a local residence to perform the first 2010 Census enumeration.

What is the 2010 Census Road Tour?

At 2010 Census Portrait of America Road Tour events, participants can learn about the 2010 Census and the positive impact their participation can have on their local community and the nation.

2010 Census Vehicles

The 2010 Census Portrait of America Road Tour consists of 13 vehicles visiting communities across the nation from January to April 2010.

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A Peek Into Netflix Queues (NY Times)

Monday, January 11th, 2010

[Editor's note: Props to Matthew and Amanda at the New York Times for this Google Maps mashup by zip code (choropleth) of common Netflix rentals in selected U.S. metros. Easy to use interface based on Flash API still allows advanced options for sorting and mouseOver of "neighborhood" zipcodes  returns movie watching profile. Far more interesting than dry census stats ;)]

Republished from the New York Times.

Examine Netflix rental patterns, neighborhood by neighborhood, in a dozen cities. Some titles with distinct patterns are Mad Men, Obsessed and Last Chance Harvey.

Interact with the original at the New York Times . . . (Screenshot below.)

nytimes_netflixmap

By Matthew Bloch, Amanda Cox, Jo Craven McGinty and Kevin Quealy/The New York Times

Embeddable US Demographics Map (ESRI via FreeGeoTools)

Thursday, October 22nd, 2009

[Editor's note: This was demo'd at NACIS earlier this month. Raster thematic map tiles delivered via Flash API that are still interactive. ESRI's solution to Google mashups.]

Republished from Free Geography Tools.

As a demo of the ArcGIS API for Flex, ESRI has a new page that lets you create an embeddable/shareable map of demographic data by US county. Only seven datasets available now:

  • Median Household Income
  • Population Change 2000-2009
  • Population Density (per sq. mile)
  • Median Home Value
  • Unemployment Rate
  • Average Household Size
  • Median Age

Map creation is trivially easy – select the demographic dataset from a dropdown, zoom the map to the desired extents, set a map size in pixels, and you’re done; links to a map with your parameters, and code for an embeddable map, are generated automatically. Here’s an embedded map, scrollable and zoomable; unemployment rate is the default dataset, but you can choose other sets with the dropdown menu at upper right:

More datasets would be nice, as would control over colors and ranges …

Interact with the original at Free Geography Tools . . .

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