Posts Tagged ‘api’

Where 2.0 2010 Dates and Location Announced (O’Reilly)

Thursday, August 20th, 2009

where2-2010

Republished from O’Reilly.

March 30 – April 1, 2010 at the San Jose, Marriott, CA.

The 2010 O’Reilly Where 2.0 Conference Call for Participation Is Now Open

Become Location Enabled at Where 2.0

Location awareness is everywhere now, baked into our desktops, iPhones, cameras–even our oil rigs–right from the start. We expect our tools to sense and interpret data to help us locate and visualize everything from a new restaurant to the source of a new millennium plague. Who is leading the charge to the next mapping frontier? How are companies large and small jumping in change the rules in mid-game? And where is the money?

O’Reilly Media is seeking proposals for sessions and workshops from the builders and innovators in the location industry. Are you a mobile maven creating rich information overlays? A GIS veteran mashing up temporal data with maps? An open source developer hacking up a cool visualization tool? A CIO using location information to revamp a public transit system?

If you’re passionate about enabling location awareness in our lives and our work, we want to hear from you. Submit a proposal to speak at Where 2.0 by October 13, 2009.

Topics we’ll be exploring at Where 2.0 2010 include:

  • Mobile Trends and Devices
  • Rich Analysis Tools
  • Augmented Reality
  • Temporal Information
  • Government 2.0
  • Machine Learning
  • Crisis Mapping and Disease Awareness
  • Local Search
  • Cartography
  • Geo Support in Web Application Frameworks
  • GeoStack and GeoBrowsers
  • Mapping APIs
  • GeoTargeting
  • Data Management
  • Local Search and Advertising
  • Protocols and Formats

Where 2.0 is one of the world’s foremost events dedicated to exploring the emerging technologies in the geospatial industry. At Where 2.0, we expose the tools pushing the boundaries of the location frontier, track the emergence of new business models and services, and examine new sources of data and the platforms for collecting them.

Happening March 30-April 1, 2010 at the San Jose Marriott in San Jose, California, Where 2.0 brings together the people, projects, and issues building the new technological foundations and creating value in the location industry. Join with other developers, technologists, CTOs, researchers, geographers, academics, business developers, and entrepreneurs to debate and discuss what’s viable now, and what’s lurking just below the radar. Learn more about Where 2.0.

Important Dates

The submission deadline for all proposals is October 13, 2009.
Early registration opens in December 2009.
Standard registration begins February 2010.

More information at O’Reilly . . .

3D Perspective in the Maps API for Flash! (GoogleGeoDev)

Friday, August 14th, 2009

[Editor's note: This seems kinda odd given the poor image resolution, but I'm sure there's a use for it and someone will figure out how to sample higher res tiles. Thanks Laris!]

R

2-D maps are great, but sometimes it’s cool to gaze into the distance. Today we’re happy to announce support for perspective in the Maps API for Flash. We’ve taken the regular API, added pitch and yaw, borrowed the look-around control from Google Earth, and thrown in some nifty camera trajectory support. The opportunity to see the world from a chosen point of view is now in the hands of a user!

perspectivemapgooglemapsapi

Here’s a perspective map in action. Sit back and watch or dive in and drag the view. Try holding down the zoom plus (+) or minus (-) buttons to see the new smooth continuous zoom.

Play with demos and the possibilities emerge. Shadows stretch out as the land tilts back. Foreground detail blends with background context. Movement through the world becomes first-person in nature and distant features can rapidly be dragged to the fore. On a regular map a cluster of markers might only confuse. Spin a perspective map and their pattern becomes clear as nearer markers pass in front of their more remote partners.

A key strength of Flash is its ubiquitous nature and we’ve taken care to develop an API that preserves this advantage. While supporting the latest, greatest Flash players, the API requires only Flash 9. Build a single target and API runtime code matches implementation library to player version. Flash 10 users gain the benefits of the native 3-D graphics support–rendering speed and accuracy–but Flash 9 users won’t be left out.

So how do you create a 3-D map? If you’ve not used the Maps API for Flash before here we’ve got lots of documentation to help you get up and running. For those who’ve used the API and have an existing map to hand, three quick changes should suffice:

  • Replace Map with Map3D
  • Turn on perspective:
    Map3D.viewMode = View.VIEWMODE_PERSPECTIVE;
  • Replace the old position and zoom controls with the new navigation control:
    addControl(NavigationControl);

While this new functionality is aimed at Flash developers, we also have the Earth plugin and API for those of you working with JavaScript and the JS-based Maps API. For developers using the Maps API for Flash, today’s release is just an extension of the existing Flash API; where it makes sense, we have borrowed some learnings from the Earth API (and will continue to do so). From a user’s viewpoint, if you’ve used the Earth plugin or Google Earth, the controls will all be familiar. We’ve kept the same basic key mappings. Add SHIFT to tilt the map, or CTRL to tilt your view and you’re ready to go. More features are hidden just under the surface. Animate a flight from A to B, or apply perspective scaling to your markers. See the new API reference documentation for details.

As always, for those of us working on APIs, the most rewarding aspect is of seeing what developers do with it. Here’s what some of our trusted testers have done to date:

UK Weather Tour ArcGIS Services PaperVision3D Scene
Ian Watkins Nianwei Liu Satoshi Ueyama
Eiffel Tower KMZ 3D Driving Simulator Weather Radar GroundOverlay
Masashi K Katsuomi.K Andrew Trice

Check out some more demos, have a play, make some maps, and let us know what you think!

INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC: The Post 200 Database (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, May 13th, 2009

gr2009051202461

[Editor's note: Uses the Flare visualization API in Flash ActionScript 3 to display data about the Post 200 companies in a treemap format. A vexing and il-documented API, but powerful. We considered showing the data with a graduated circle map but the company locations were too clustered for that to be effective.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
13 May 2009. By Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso and Terri Rupar – The Washington Post

Use our interactive graphic to explore data — including revenue and employment — for the top companies in the Washington area.

Boxes represent individual companies grouped together by sector, size based on data.

View the interactive version at The Washington Post . . .

post200interactive

iPhone SDK 3.0 – Playing with Map Kit (ObjectGraph)

Friday, May 8th, 2009

mapkit3_logo

[Editor's note: Three part series on the new iPhone 3.0 map APIs for aspiring map application developers from the ObjectGraph.blog.]

Republished from the ObjectGraph.blog.

I started looking at the Map Kit API for developing a quick and dirty – Find where you parked your car – application.

There is no programming guide for Map Kit yet on the developer pages for Apple, So I decided to share some some of it here.

UPDATE: Follow the second part here
http://blog.objectgraph.com/index.php/2009/04/03/iphone-sdk-30-playing-with-map-kit-part-2/

I started looking at the Map Kit API for developing a quick and dirty – Find where you parked your car – application.

There is no programming guide for Map Kit yet on the developer pages for Apple, So I decided to share some some of it here.

The main class that supports a Map is called

MKMapView

You need to include the header

MapKit/MapKit.h

Also dont forget to add a reference to the Framework MapKit.Framework

The code is relatively simple. Here are the steps

  • Create a simple project – I chose utility application – Name it whatever you want
  • Go to MainViewController.h
  • Include the header MapKit/MapKit.h

Continue reading at ObjectGraph.blog . . .

Density Mapping in Google Maps with HeatMapAPI (GeoChalkboard)

Monday, April 27th, 2009

[Editor's note: Heat maps are a useful way to qualitatively represent densely clustered point locations on a map. This post from GeoChalkboard walks thru how to create using the Google Maps API and the HeatMap API.]

Republished from GeoChalkboard, there on March 11, 2009.

In the GIS world heat maps are a graphical representation of point data on a map through the use of colors that indicate the density of some variable such as crime incidents or traffic accidents.  Heat maps let users quickly visualize the density of locations. Being able to understand the density of point locations makes it much easier to see patterns in your data, especially when using colors. In this post we’re going to examine the HeatMapAPI, a JavaScript API for creating heat maps in Google Maps.


(Above) 2009 Starbucks Store Closures

Introduction
HeatMapAPI can be used over the Internet or as a .NET DLL that runs in a local environment and allows you to integrate heat map images into Google Maps or other GIS systems.  In this post we’re going to use HeatMapAPI to visualize the density of recent Starbucks store closures.  In a recent statement, Starbucks announced the closure of 600+ stores in the United States due to economic conditions.

Continue reading at GeoChalkboard . . .

Flickr Geotagged Photos as Cartogram Map

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

flickerdistribution

[Editor's note: As more cameras and users tag their photos on upload into the Flickr pool, we can visualize where users are contributing via the above cartogram and below as 3d globe map. The cartogram source isn't attributed, but I like how it breaks out high and medium contribution areas in blue and pink, and then shows largly unpopulated areas (but still popular to photograph in the Amazon's case) in green, and then ocean areas in grey. Or thats my take on it ;) Thanks Lynda!]

Republished from Flickr user Straup and RevDanCatt.

Play movie at original site, screenshot below.

flickrprocessing
So, here it is, 24 hours worth of geotagged photos (64,410) from last Monday, March 23rd. Our numbers say that around 30% are normally private, giving us a total of around 92,000 geotagged photos for that day, which is just over 1 photo geotagged per second.

All the data was pulled down (using Processing, of all things) via the API, and probably took around 12 minutes (when it’s behaving itself) as I was being a) gentle with the servers b) was getting it as JSON which takes a while for Processing to parse each page (more information here: blog.blprnt.com/blog/blprnt/processing-json-the-new-york-…. And then written to a flat file.

Continue reading and view video at Flickr . . .

Interactive: Obama’s Appointments (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

[Editor's note: I did the Flash ActionScript 3 programming behind Head Count: Tracking Obama's Appointments. This ambitious, collaborative database-driven project tracks the Obama administration’s senior political appointments and will be kept up-to-date with the latest happenings. A look at some of the interactive features you can find at washingtonpost.com/headcount.]

Interactive graphic and database by Sarah Cohen, Karen Yourish, Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, Ryan O’Neil, Paul Volpe, Sarah Sampsel and Laura Stanton.

This project draws on concepts from these two blog posts in particular: It Ain’t Easy To Get A Newspaper To Provide Useful Data (TechDirt) and The New Journalism: Goosing the Gray Lady (NY Times).

Republished from The Washington Post

Heads Pop Up and Heads Roll: Let’s Keep Track.
By Al Kamen; Wednesday, March 18, 2009; Page A11

Today we launch Head Count, The Washington Post’s interactive database to help you keep a sharp eye on the people President Obama is appointing to the nearly 500 top positions in the federal government that require Senate confirmation. The new feature will not only tell you who they are but also help you count all the demographic beans — age, sex, ethnicity, education (elite schools or not), home states and so on.

At http://www.washingtonpost.com/headcount, you can search agency by agency to determine which jobs are still open, should your private-sector job be looking a little shaky these days. You can also search by individual to determine how many officials in this “change” administration are merely retreads from the Clinton days.

And Head Count will give some clues to help answer everyone’s perennial question: How did that fool get that great job? It will also tell you who paid good, hard money or bundled huge sums for Obama/Biden, who worked on the campaign, who had the coveted Harvard Law connection, hailed from Chicago or was a pal of Michelle Obama, Tom Daschle or Ted Kennedy.

The appointments that are tracked by Head Count do not include judges, ambassadors, U.S. attorneys or U.S. marshals. We’ll monitor those separately. Nor does the database include the many important officials who are not confirmed by the Senate. We’ll be tweaking the database as we go, adding new categories, such as veterans, and making other additions.

Loop Fans can help! If you’ve got information we could use or suggestions about how to improve the site, please submit comments and updates at the link provided on the Head Count Web site.

NOMINATING PARTY

The White House personnel logjam — also known as the Great Daschle Debacle — appears to have been broken. Team Obama’s nominations operation began at a record pace. But IRS problems sparked Health and Human Services nominee Tom Daschle‘s withdrawal on Feb. 3, leading to a general revetting of nominees that stalled everything.

The numbers are startling. Obama, by the end of his first week in office, had announced 47 nominees for senior-most jobs. He’d officially nominated 37 of them, according to data compiled by New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service Presidential Transition Project. (That number includes some holdovers.)

But in the month after Daschle’s withdrawal, the White House announced only 10 candidates for Senate-confirmed positions and formally nominated only six people.

In the next three weeks, however, the pace ramped up sharply, with 42 nominees named. Official nominations have been slower — only 27 during that time. But there were 15 last week, and we’re told there are plenty in the pipeline. As of yesterday, there were 39 Senate-confirmed individuals on the job. (That includes seven holdovers.)

The push now is to get as many nominees up to the Senate — and get confirmation for the three dozen or so already up there — before the Senate slithers out of town on April 3.

View the interactive at The Washington Post . . .

JOB: Developer Evangelist at CloudMade (SF Bay)

Monday, February 16th, 2009

[Editor's note: If you're in the market for a mapping GIScience programmer, developers relations type job in the San Francisco Bay area, check out this job listing via LinkedIn posting. They just released some mapping APIs that are worth checking out. This position would promote the APIs and refine them. Thanks Kirstin!]

Location: Menlo Park, California (San Francisco Bay Area)
URL: http://cloudmade.com
Type: Full-time
Experience: Mid-Senior level
Functions: Product Management, Business Development, Marketing
Posted: February 16, 2009

Job Description
Do you have what it takes to build a passionate developer community from the ground up? Does your life revolve around technology? Do you have a passion for mapping and location technologies? If you have big
ideas along with the courage and dedication to follow them through, we’d like to talk to you. We’re hiring a Developer Evangelist who will join us in building a community of developers who will create the next
generation of mapping tools and services.

The position requires enthusiasm, dedication and a genuine desire to change the world for ever. In return we offer a competitive salary, an environment in which you will grow professionally – and the chance to be part of something really big.

The Developer Evangelist will be responsible for promoting and evangelizing CloudMade’s platform – which includes a range of APIs, libraries and SDKs. You will be joining an early stage start-up and will be working for the head of Product Management. As the position grows and as you develop you will play an important role in expanding our Developer Outreach program working both 1:1 with key developers, 1:Few with key influential individuals and 1:Many with the whole community of developers.

Skills

  • Build a strong and fast growing developer community around CloudMade’s platform
  • Establish processes for the CloudMade developer outreach program, setting targets for recruiting developers, developing, tracking and refining outreach activities
  • Evangelizing CloudMade’s tools to developer communities in the US and EU.
  • Engaging with target groups of developers in multiple locations, discovering their “needs and wants” and communicating their requests to CloudMade Product Management
  • Working with the CloudMade team to create outreach material that clearly communicates the opportunities and advantages of our tools
  • Actively seeking opportunities to engage with a wide range of developers – from small companies to start-ups to medium sized and large operations
  • Developing sample applications and code that demonstrate the depth and breadth of the CloudMade platform
  • Tirelessly promoting and evangelizing CloudMade’s mission to create a world class location based application development platform


Company Description

CloudMade is a fast paced start-up that is changing the way people use maps and location. Our tools allow developers to build powerful location based applications on top of a rich, crowd-sourced global mapping database. We launched our first sets of tools and APIs in February 2009 and now we’re looking for passionate, committed people to evangelize CloudMade’s message into developer communities around
the world.

Additional Information

Applicants with recommendations are preferred.
Referrals through network preferred.

Continue to LinkedIn posting . . .

TRAINING: Building Rich Internet Applications with ArcGIS API for Flex (ESRI)

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009

[Editor's note: Take advantage of free training from GIS-leader ESRI. Thanks Mary Kate!]

Republished from ESRI.

When: Thursday, January 29, 2009
Three broadcast noted in three local time zones

  • 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., or 3:00 p.m. (PST)
  • Noon, 2:00 p.m., or 6:00 p.m. (EST)
  • 5:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m., or 11:00 p.m. (UTC/GMT)

Do you want to use the new ArcGIS API for Flex to build fast and visually rich Web mapping applications? We will show you how during Building Rich Internet Applications with ArcGIS API for Flex, the next ESRI live training seminar. You will learn the concepts of rich Internet applications (RIAs) and what tools are needed to start building Web mapping applications with ArcGIS API for Flex that you can deploy on the Internet or to the desktop.

During the seminar, you also will learn about:

  • The capabilities of the Adobe Flex framework and the ArcGIS API for Flex features and functionality
  • How to use existing Flex components with ArcGIS API for Flex
  • What to consider when authoring and deploying applications in a Web server
  • Other educational resources available about Flex applications and how to obtain the information

Viewing the Seminar

A broadband Internet connection and an ESRI Global Account (free) are needed to watch the seminar. An ESRI Global Account is complimentary and only takes a few minutes to create. A few weeks after the live presentation, a recorded version of the seminar will be archived and available for viewing.

For more information, visit ESRI Training and Education.

INTERACTIVE MAP: Explore D.C.’s Charter Schools (Kelso via Wash Post)

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

[Editor's note: I created this Flash-based Google Mashup to accompany an investigative piece (1 | 2 | 3) about the Washington, D.C. Public Charter School system in Sunday's Washington Post newspaper. Map markers can be turned on and off with check boxes or by using data range sliders to drill in on which schools are performing how well. Clicking on map markers brings up a little info window with some facts and figures about that school, and links to full database entry and comment areas. While publishing this interactive in Flash format may hinder viewing by some viewers, it sure is nice not having to program around HTML rendering funk!]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Use the map below to learn about every charter school in The District. The default view displays all 55 schools for which test score data is available; you can also map the schools with no data, as well as sites offering early childhood and adult education and GED programs. To narrow your search, click the buttons to hide or display school types, or move the sliders directly to the left of the map to display schools by test performance. A full list of all charter schools is also available.

Interact with the original. Downsized screenshot below.

SOURCES: The District of Columbia, individual schools and Washington Post research and analysis.

INTERACTIVE CREDITS: Nathaniel Vaughn-Kelso – The Washington Post, Sarah Sampsel – washingtonpost.com.