Posts Tagged ‘arcmap’

How Can You Tell What Map Scales Are Shown For Online Maps? (ESRI)

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

scales_table

[Editor's note: I'm working on a group base map project that will be released in October that is for mapping at the 1:10,000,000 (1:10m) scale and smaller (regional continental to global at small print dimensions). I want this data to be easily used with online mapping services, but converting Google map tile set "levels" to natural scale equivelants isn't obvious. I remembered seeing this table at last year's NACIS conference in Missoula, Montana. Charlie Frye was kind enough to remind me where to find it on the ESRI site.]

Republished from ESRI Mapping Center.

As you zoom in (or out) of the online maps you see on Virtual Earth (VE) or Google Maps (GM), you are actually seeing a series of different maps with slightly different information displayed at each zoom level. Zoom level is indicated and controlled in an online map by the vertical zoom slider, like the one shown at the left in the image here. Whenever the zoom level is changed, a different map is shown.

Of course, these maps are well designed so that viewers are largely unaware that they are seeing these different maps. The foundation for good design of an “online map” hinges on understanding how to design for each of the zoom level represented in the entire online map. Colors, fonts, number of and types of features, etc. are all seriously considered when each of the maps is created for each of the zoom levels.

When authoring this kind of online map with ArcGIS, a map document containing group layers, one for each zoom level, is a good approach. (The Working with layers and scale ranges blog entry provides a good overview of how to organize a map document this way.) Each zoom level in the online map is represented by your work at a specific map scale in the ArcMap document. The hard part is to figure out which zoom level matches to which map scale. There are twenty zoom levels for Virtual Earth or Google Maps. The corresponding map scales that you would design and create your maps at if you wanted them to mash up on VE or GM are:

Continue reading at ESRI Mapping Center . . .

TRAINING: Building Rich Internet Applications with ArcGIS API for Flex (ESRI)

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Take advantage of free training from GIS-leader ESRI. Thanks Mary Kate!]

Republished from ESRI.

When: Thursday, January 29, 2009
Three broadcast noted in three local time zones

  • 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., or 3:00 p.m. (PST)
  • Noon, 2:00 p.m., or 6:00 p.m. (EST)
  • 5:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m., or 11:00 p.m. (UTC/GMT)

Do you want to use the new ArcGIS API for Flex to build fast and visually rich Web mapping applications? We will show you how during Building Rich Internet Applications with ArcGIS API for Flex, the next ESRI live training seminar. You will learn the concepts of rich Internet applications (RIAs) and what tools are needed to start building Web mapping applications with ArcGIS API for Flex that you can deploy on the Internet or to the desktop.

During the seminar, you also will learn about:

  • The capabilities of the Adobe Flex framework and the ArcGIS API for Flex features and functionality
  • How to use existing Flex components with ArcGIS API for Flex
  • What to consider when authoring and deploying applications in a Web server
  • Other educational resources available about Flex applications and how to obtain the information

Viewing the Seminar

A broadband Internet connection and an ESRI Global Account (free) are needed to watch the seminar. An ESRI Global Account is complimentary and only takes a few minutes to create. A few weeks after the live presentation, a recorded version of the seminar will be archived and available for viewing.

For more information, visit ESRI Training and Education.

New Web 2.0 APIs Make GIS Access and Integration Capability Available to Everyone (ESRI ArcNews)

Thursday, November 13th, 2008

[Editor's note: 2 of 2 articles of note from the Fall 2008 ESRI ArcNews magazine. This about new ArcGIS web 2.0 API services for JavaScript and Flex / Actionscript / MXML allow Google Maps style mashups. Includes informative podcast.]

Republished from ESRI ArcNews.

ArcGIS Server 9.3 Radically Simplifies Users’ Experience

click to enlarge An executive dashboard mashup created with ArcGIS Server that provides city staff the ability to monitor the status of capital improvements, 311 calls, and police patrols.

With the release of ArcGIS 9.3, ESRI provides a new set of application programming interfaces (APIs) that extend the range of what developers can do with mashups. These APIs give mashup developers more opportunities to rapidly build lightweight, focused applications on top of ArcGIS Server using JavaScript, Flex, Silverlight, and many other scripting languages. As a result, organizations can begin deploying an entirely new pattern of mashups, which involves combining internal and external data sources to create an application that solves a particular problem. These mashups more closely match the types of relationships, workflows, and administration developers need to support on a daily basis.

GIS-powered mashups empower users to solve real problems by incorporating the business knowledge and resource investments made by the organization and putting it in the hands of the decision makers and analysts who need to rely on trusted information. For example, a city government might build a mashup that focuses on vacant properties or brownfields to support community planning and economic development. In this case, parcel data might be combined with tools to analyze the development potential of a property based on different scenarios. The tools would appear as a simple button or drop-down menu of choices but, when executed, would access internally hosted information, such as zoning, crime, and infrastructure, and perform server-side analytics on the GIS server. The user would be presented with a hot spot or graduated-color map highlighting the areas that best met the selected criteria. This type of mashup could be used at the front counter or on the desk of an economic development specialist to help engage business and industry owners interested in moving their operation to the community. It would provide access to authoritative data not readily available on the Internet.

click to enlarge ArcGIS Server offers a rich set of tools to build lightweight Web applications.

Until recently, mashups have been thought of as Web applications that aggregate data feeds from multiple Web services into a simple and often social or consumer-oriented Web application. Mapping mashups show the locations of points of interest generated from available services and GeoRSS feeds that contain spatial information, such as addresses or coordinates. Now, organizations are adopting the concept that mashups can be useful for conducting business and providing critical functionality to their users and business partners either over the Web or through internal distribution. Enterprise systems, like customer relationship management (CRM) or asset management systems, can be coupled with ArcGIS Server services to provide business and government managers and analysts with unique access to their authoritative knowledge bases. This means that an enterprise mashup must efficiently and seamlessly blend the GIS platform with the organization’s underlying systems architecture.

ArcGIS Server gives organizations the ability to manage and deploy Web services for mapping, data management, and geospatial analytics. These ArcGIS Server Web services allow organizations to leverage their internal GIS resources, as well as services hosted on other GIS servers, and put them to work in enterprise mashups. Because ArcGIS Server is built on industry and Web standards to support service-oriented architectures (SOAs) and hundreds of data formats, organizations are provided with an integration platform for creating and managing enterprise mashups.

In-depth description of the JavaScript and Flex APIs and podcast links on the next page…

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ArcGIS Online Services—The Foundation of Web GIS (ESRI)

Thursday, November 13th, 2008

[Editor's note: 1 of 2 articles of note from the Fall 2008 ESRI ArcNews magazine. This about new ArcGIS online services, eg personal "Google maps" style mashups, and pricing.]

Republished from ESRI ArcNews.

Highlights

  • ArcGIS Online premium services are now available.
  • Leverage ArcGIS Online services and ArcGIS APIs in mashups.
  • Use ArcGIS Online content locally via ArcGIS Data Appliance and DataDoors for ArcGIS.

In the past few years, the Web has greatly facilitated the dissemination and sharing of GIS capabilities, leading to the new term Web GIS. This reflects the growing use of the Web as a platform that supports authoring geoprocessing models and maps, then publishing them as services that can be easily consumed by a variety of client applications. Ad hoc consumption of multiple data sources and distributed services makes it easier to find and use geographic information, as well as share it with other GIS professionals, customers, constituents, and the public.

click to enlarge Users can add their own GIS layers to Virtual Earth basemaps.

As an emerging dominant platform for both social and business-driven interaction, Web GIS merges (or mashes up) authoritative content with user-generated content to deliver location-based information and applications to a broader audience. Consumers can view a map showing the locations of gas stations with the lowest prices or analyze the impact a wildfire might have on their home and property. Emergency response officials can use that same wildfire map and add their own data on top of it to analyze how to plan and respond to a worst-case scenario, including routing personnel and equipment and devising evacuation routes for the populations at risk. Local governments can now provide information to their constituents in a more timely and cost-effective manner via the Web, allowing them, for example, to browse homeownership information or parcel records online or inform residents about upcoming street maintenance projects that will impact neighborhood traffic. Common to all these examples is the need for ready-to-use, current, and accurate basemap data that sometimes has to be available on short notice and onto which proprietary data can be easily overlaid, or mashed up, in order to provide information in a useful and meaningful context.

ArcGIS Online Services, powered by ArcGIS Server, can be crawled, indexed, searched, and used to share information and provide analytic capabilities to a broader audience over the Web or a network in the most effective manner. Developers who want to serve live, dynamic mapping applications over the Web can easily implement ArcGIS Online. For example, a viewer application, such as the one featured in the ArcGIS Online Services Resource Center (resources.esri.com/arcgisonlineservices) can be built quickly using the ArcGIS APIs for JavaScript. Users can also add additional content, such as photos or video and sound files.

In-depth description of the online map services, resolutions, coverage and podcasts on the next page…

click to enlarge

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Using SVG to Create Interactive Maps on the Apple iPhone (James Fee)

Monday, October 27th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Republished from James Fee’s GIS Blog on Sept. 18th 2008. Hopefully Apple and Adobe will figure out their differences.]

So you can’t have Silverlight, Java or Flash to develop interactive mapping on the iPhone and have to “resort” to using JavaScript. Well maybe not, could SVG be the way forward to creating mapping websites on the iPhone?  My 2G iPhone seems to support SVG fairly well, but many SVG sites aren’t optimized for the iPhone.  Take ESRI’s abandoned (?) SVG Viewer:

ESRIs ArcWeb SVG Viewer

ESRI’s ArcWeb SVG Viewer

It loads and you can turn on and off the “widgets” with ease.  But navigating it was impossible.  I know zero about developing with SVG so I suppose someone else will have to comment on if it is possible to create iPhone compatible navigation for SVG apps.  Heck if ESRI were to make a ArcGIS Server SVG API compatible for the iPhone, every ArcGIS Server implementation would be viewable on the iPhone.

ArcGIS 9.3 Now Exports Geo PDF Maps (ESRI)

Monday, October 20th, 2008

Adobe® Acrobat® and Adobe Reader® version 9 support a new version of PDF that allows for encoding of map coordinate system and georeference information inside the PDF file.

[Update 2010 August 13: To make this work in ArcMap 9.3 you need to apply the ArcGIS (Desktop, Engine, Server) 9.3 Map Export Patch. That installs two DLLs that allow the Export Map Georeference Information checkbox. Without that, you’re maps might have layers, but no coordinate system.]

This news release was in the summer 2008 issue (read) of the Arc user magazine but it came up last week at NACIS. Why is this better than other PDF solutions like TerraGo? It is completely free to both the cartographer and map reader and requires basic Adobe Acrobat (no plugins to download). ESRI and Adobe collaborated for a year on these PDF geospatial capabilities enhancements.

It works on both Mac and PC while other solutions are PC only. It is not full featured, though feature attributes and coordinates are accessible in Acrobat. But nifty tidbit: with Acrobat Pro you can import supplementary geo data into an existing geo PDF, even if it is in a different projection, and it will overlay onto the map. Might turn out to be a quick and dirty reprojection trick for those without ArcMap.

Most information below directly from ESRI promotional material.

ArcGIS 9.3 has new and improved functionality for exporting maps to Adobe PDF including map layers and location information for end users with Adobe Acrobat 9 or Reader 9 software. These enhancements are available as a freely downloadable patch for ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Server, and ArcGIS Engine. This patch enables ArcGIS Desktop, Engine, and Server applications to export georeferenced PDF files.

When a georeferenced PDF is opened in a compatible viewer, such as Adobe Reader 9, the user can access geospatial functions like coordinate readout and find XY.  This patch enables ArcGIS Desktop, Engine, and Server applications to export georeferenced PDF files.

Check out this video demonstration from ESRI TV:

Getting Illustrator Map Symbols into ArcMap (ESRI)

Sunday, October 19th, 2008

A friend recently asked me if it was possible to get the same custom map symbols he is using in the Adobe Illustrator design package into his ESRI ArcMap project. I recommended saving them out as EMF (Windows Meta File format) which are readable in ArcMap. Newer version of Adobe Illustrator save this format on both the Mac and PC (early Mac versions didn’t).

ESRI has two official workflow recommendations in their Mapping Center “Ask a Cartographer” section, both which involve EMF export. Kudos to Charlie and Aileen at ESRI for making the Mapping Center helpful:

1. Convert EPS symbols into a ESRI style (view at ESRI.com)

Q: I have symbols that are right now in EPS format and I would like to create a style with them. What is the best way to proceed ?

Mapping Center Answer:

There are two potential workflows:

  1. If the EPS files are multi-color use a graphics software package to export them to .EMF files that you can make picture marker symbols from.  I’t important to set the artboard for each EPS file to match the extent of the graphics in order to get a good result.  This will work for single color EPS artwork as well.

2. Getting Illustrator-made symbols into ArcMap (view at ESRI.com)

Q: I would like to take symbols/icons that I created in Illustrator then export them into ArcMap for use in map production. If this question is already answered, could you direct me to that resource?

Mapping Center Answer:

You should export each of your Illy symbols/icons to a .EMF file and those can be used to create Picture Marker Symbols in ArcMap.  Our help topic on Creating Marker Symbols explains how to create picture markers from EMF files; it’s the next to the last procedure in that topic.

  • In many cases we copy EPS artwork into a font editing software package and create a TrueType font.  We do that because we’ve developed the in-house expertise to do so and that had a bit of a learning curve.  However, if you want to create representation marker symbols you can dispense with the refined aspects of that workflow because it is possible to create representation markers from font-based markers, but not with EMF files.  Once the artwork is converted to a representation marker it is easier to edit any remaining qualities of the graphic in the representation marker editor.
  • ESRI ArcMap Web Mashup Services (Recap)

    Wednesday, July 9th, 2008

    The Spring edition of ArcNews recaps some important ESRI announcements about version 9.3′s ability to create mashups on par with Google Maps that were announced at the 2008 ESRI Developer Summit. More than 1,200 developers representing 69 organizations in 49 countries attended the conference. Images and summaries below from ESRI. [ ] enclose my comments.

    esri 2008 conf 1

    “The ArcGIS 9.3 platform places a much greater emphasis on the Web,” said [Scott] Morehouse [director of Software Development at ESRI]. “The technology platform for GIS has evolved over the years. Initially, the focus was on leveraging minicomputers and workstations with an emphasis on high-performance computing and end-user interactivity. Then, the focus shifted to the database with an emphasis on information modeling and transactional data management. Now, the focus is on the Web. We have been working to put the Web at the center of everything that we’re doing with the ArcGIS system.”

    JavaScript and REST APIs

    The new APIs were showcased at the Plenary Session and in technical sessions presented by the ArcGIS engineers who developed them. In the REST API session, there were demonstrations of how to use JavaScript, Python, Ruby, and Yahoo! Pipes to access backend REST services powered and published by ArcGIS Server. All resources and operations exposed by the REST API are accessible through a URL.

    In the ArcGIS JavaScript APIs session, there were demonstrations on how mashups can be built using JavaScript with REST that add map layers and tasks from ArcGIS Server to Google Maps and Microsoft Virtual Earth. The JavaScript API comes in three flavors: ArcGIS JavaScript API, ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for Microsoft Virtual Earth, and ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for Google Maps. [A Flash based API is also planned].

    ArcGIS Server 9.3 Offers New and Enhanced Support for OGC Standards

    At 9.3, ArcGIS Server provides enhanced support for the three leading Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web standards: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS), and Web Coverage Service (WCS). In addition, with the recent announcement from OGC that Keyhole Markup Language (KML) 2.2 is now an official OGC standard, ArcGIS Server at 9.3 will comply with the OGC KML specification by allowing users to publish their geographic data as KML 2.2. Read more.

    esri 2008 conf 3

    New Features in ArcGIS Engine 9.3 Coming Soon

    ArcGIS Engine developers can also now use the integrated Eclipse 3.3 plug-in to inspect the state of ArcObjects. In addition, ArcGIS Engine 9.3 supports the Java Development Kit version 6 on the latest platforms. Read more.