Posts Tagged ‘art’

Wildlife made from collaged maps (boingboing)

Thursday, April 15th, 2010

elkb

[Editor’s note: Also check out the work by Shannon Rankin who takes maps and re-creates them into landscapes. Maya Lin has similar interests. Thanks @amproehl, @vicchi, and others.]

Republished from BoingBoing.

Artist Jason LaFerrera makes wildlife collages out of old maps. His first show is coming up in Richmond, VA, and he’s posted some samples of the material he’ll be showing, along with some limited run prints on Etsy.

Check out the artwork . . .

Helios Exhibit: Eadweard Muybridge in a Time of Change (Corcoran in DC)

Monday, April 12th, 2010

muybridge-1

[Editor's note: Famous for his "groundbreaking studies of animal and human locomotion, 19th-century photographer Eadweard Muybridge was also an innovative landscape artist and pioneer of documentary subjects." The exhibit looks at all aspects of the artist's work and is open at the Corcoran art gallery in Washington DC now thru July 18th. Cost is $10 per adult, open Weds - Sunday.]

Republished from the Corcoran.

Best known for his groundbreaking studies of animal and human locomotion, 19th-century photographer Eadweard Muybridge was also an innovative landscape artist and pioneer of documentary subjects. Helios: Eadweard Muybridge in a Time of Change is the first retrospective exhibition to examine all aspects of Muybridge’s art.

Structured in a series of thematic sections, the exhibition includes numerous vintage photographs, albums, stereographs, lantern slides, glass negatives and positives, camera equipment, patent models, Zoopraxiscope discs, proof prints, notes, books, and other ephemera. Over 300 objects created between 1858 and 1893 are brought together for the first time from numerous international collections. Muybridge’s only surviving Zoopraxiscope—an apparatus he designed in 1879 to project motion pictures—will also be on view.

Organized by Corcoran chief curator and head of research Philip Brookman, the exhibition will also travel to Tate Britain in London from September 8, 2010 through January 16, 2011, and to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from February 26 through June 7, 2011. A catalogue of the exhibition, with new essays by Brookman, Marta Braun, Andy Grundberg, Corey Keller, and Rebecca Solnit, will be published Steidl.

Plan your visit . . .

Save Darfur Map Poster

Monday, March 15th, 2010

save_darfur_poster

[Editor’s note: Plays off catch phrase: “Thought About Saving Darfur?” Saw this paper flier posted at a sandwich place near work in DC last week.]

Republished from SaveDarfur.org.

Montreal Pothole Art (Ficca & Luciano via Montreal Gazette)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

mypotholes

[Editor's note: "Montreal couple's photo exhibition – which includes a shot of a scuba diver ready to take the plunge – is a fun and fulfilling way of looking at our urban curse."]

Republished from the Montreal Gazette.

They’re as Montreal as smoked meat, street hockey and the two-cheek kiss. They sprout like mushrooms in the spring thaw. They wreck car suspensions, wreak havoc on cyclists and give our city a Third World veneer: potholes.

Spring had just sprung this year when Davide Luciano and Claudia Ficca were cruising through Outremont in their 1997 Jetta and they hit a big one, “really hard.” “Six hundred dollars later, we came up with the idea of using potholes in a positive light,” explained Toronto-born filmmaker Luciano, 31.

“We started thinking, ‘What’s useful about these craters, what good can we bring to our city?’ ” said Ficca, 27, a recent Concordia University graduate in Italian language and literature. As both are photographers, they began imagining scenarios for a series that might be called Theme and Variations on the Pothole. They recruited family and friends, and got started.

“They were game enough to put themselves out there, in the middle of the street, dress up like fools – and be laughed at by drivers,” Ficca said of their subjects. They started shooting a few weeks after replacing the rear suspension on the Jetta. The photo sessions were mainly done during the evening rush hour, when subjects and natural light were available.

Drivers stopped in amazement and passersby laughed, the couple said. Most understood that this was about having fun with our urban curse. “We rented or borrowed props, called our friends, and took it from there,” Luciano remarked. It was a team effort for the couple, who took turns shooting with a Nikon D 80.

The first shot was of clothes being washed in a pothole. The next was a diver set to plunge. Then came a scuba diver, with flippers, ready for “the deep.”

A gardener was shot planting flowers in potholes. And Luciano posed as a “wine maker” squashing grapes barefoot in a nice hole.

Each photo is named for the street on which it was shot, and the series will be on exhibit Wednesday night.

View photos . . .

The Map as Art: Contemporary Artist Explore Cartographically (Katharine Harmon)

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

[Editor’s note: I picked up this fascinating read while in San Francisco earlier this month and devoured the artwork and critical essays by Gayle Clemans on the flight back to DC. Features pieces by Maya Lin and Paula Scher previously mentioned here. Thanks Jag!]

Artists & designers using the map medium for experimental art & innovation http://su.pr/2sijN4

Republished from BrainPickings.

What tattoo art has to do with fashion, vintage atlases and Nazi concentration camps.

We’ve always been fascinated by maps — through various elements of design, from typography to color theory to data visualization, they brilliantly condense and capture complex notions about space, scale, topography, politics and more. But where things get most interesting is that elusive intersection of the traditional and the experimental, where artists explore the map medium as a conceptual tool of abstract representation. And that’s exactly what The Map of the Art, a fantastic Morning News piece by Katharine Harmon, examines.

Corriette Schoenaerts, ‘Europe,’ 2005

Schoenaerts, a conceptual photographer living in Amsterdam, constructs countries and continents out of clothing.

Qin Ga, ‘Site 22: Mao Zedong Temple,’ 2005

In 2002, China’s Long March Project embarked upon a ‘Walking Visual Display’ along the route of the 1934-1936 historic 6000-mile Long March, and Beijing-based artist Qin kept tracked the group’s route in a tattooed map on his back. Three years later, Qin continued the trek where the original marchers had left off, accompanied by a camera crew and a tattoo artist, who continually updated the map on Qin’s back.

Continue reading at BrainPickings . . .

Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes (Corcoran in Washington, DC)

Friday, June 12th, 2009

[Editor's note: If you travel to DC this summer, check out this installation from renowned contemporary artist and architect Maya Lin of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial fame. There is a fee to enter the private museum.]

Republished from the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

Run dates: March 14, 2009 — July 12, 2009

This spring, the Corcoran Gallery of Art will present Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes—a dramatic installation of major new works by this renowned contemporary artist and architect.   On view from March 14 through July 12, the exhibition addresses contemporary ideas about landscape and geologic phenomena.  Lin’s second nationally-traveling exhibition in 10 years, Systematic Landscapes explores how people perceive and experience the landscape in a time of heightened technological influence and environmental awareness.

Lin (b. 1959) came to prominence in 1981 with her design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. and has since achieved a high degree of recognition for a body of work that includes monuments, buildings, earthworks, sculpture and installations.  Traversing Lin’s constructed landscapes in this exhibition—moving around, under, and through them—we encounter a world that has been mapped, digitized, analyzed, and then reintroduced by Lin as actual, physical structures.  Her work blends a typology of natural forms, from rivers to mountains to seas, with a visual language of scientific analysis represented by grids, models, and maps.  In doing so, Lin merges an understanding of the ideal and the real, encouraging an encounter with conceptual, sculptural and architectural modeling.

Systematic Landscapes is centered on a trio of large-scale sculptural installations: 2×4 Landscape (2006), Water Line (2006) and Blue Lake Pass (2006).  Each sculpture offers a different means for viewers to engage with and comprehend a schematic representation of landscape forms.  In these projects, Lin examines how people’s modern relationships to the land are extended, condensed, distorted and interpreted through new computer technologies.  She translates a series of dramatic landscape environments selected for their inspiring beauty and connection to life-supporting habitats into spatial environments where viewers can engage with them in an art gallery setting.

(more…)

Mental Map: How China Sees the World (Economist)

Monday, March 30th, 2009

[Editor's note: "Illustration by Jon Berkeley with apologies to Steinberg and The New Yorker". Map illustration shows China's world view / mental map with Tiananmen Square central, the US in the distance, and Europe but a spec on the horizon. This mental map is a good example of a network topology based projection.]

Republished from the March 21st, 2009 print edition of The Economist.

And how the world should see China

IT IS an ill wind that blows no one any good. For many in China even the buffeting by the gale that has hit the global economy has a bracing message. The rise of China over the past three decades has been astonishing. But it has lacked the one feature it needed fully to satisfy the ultranationalist fringe: an accompanying decline of the West. Now capitalism is in a funk in its heartlands. Europe and Japan, embroiled in the deepest post-war recession, are barely worth consideration as rivals. America, the superpower, has passed its peak. Although in public China’s leaders eschew triumphalism, there is a sense in Beijing that the reassertion of the Middle Kingdom’s global ascendancy is at hand (see article).

China’s prime minister, Wen Jiabao, no longer sticks to the script that China is a humble player in world affairs that wants to focus on its own economic development. He talks of China as a “great power” and worries about America’s profligate spending endangering his $1 trillion nest egg there. Incautious remarks by the new American treasury secretary about China manipulating its currency were dismissed as ridiculous; a duly penitent Hillary Clinton was welcomed in Beijing, but as an equal. This month saw an apparent attempt to engineer a low-level naval confrontation with an American spy ship in the South China Sea. Yet at least the Americans get noticed. Europe, that speck on the horizon, is ignored: an EU summit was cancelled and France is still blacklisted because Nicolas Sarkozy dared to meet the Dalai Lama.

Continue reading at The Economist . . .

Human Clock

Thursday, March 19th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Discovered the Human Clock site when I took my friend to the Apple Store and the genius bar dude used it to test her Airport wireless connection. User submitted photos and found art from around the word that include numbers that spell out the current time. Images updated every minute, with several variations for each. Quite amusing! Sample images below.]

View the Human Clock!

Illustrator Plugin: Live Pen

Monday, March 16th, 2009

[Editor's note: This plugin looks useful to illustrators wanting a more free form calligraphic touch for their artwork. Plugin allows variable width strokes along existing artwork objects in Adobe Illustrator. PC-only at present. If you've used it, please leave a comment on this post. Screenshots below detail work flow.]

Republished from Zero-one.
Visit their site to get demo version of plugin.

Typography and calligraphy rediscovery!

Simple plug-in help you get rich typography and calligraphy in a few click. Now available for Adobe Illustrator CS, CS2 and CS3. [Editor's note: will prob. work in CS4, too.]

Live Pen features include:

  • Digital natural drawing
  • Moving Pen Anchor
  • Simple adding or deleting Pen Anchor
  • Pens library
  • Minimal anchor after expanding
  • Smooth integration

Create your first calligraphy stroke with Live Pen

World-New Features

Digital Natural Drawing

Moving Pen Anchor

Simple Adding or Deleting Pen Anchor

Pens Library

Ed Prado Museum Tour … Now on Google Earth (Duke CIT)

Tuesday, March 10th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Google has started to add museum collections to Google Earth. The Prada in Madrid includes a self portrait by Albrecht Dürer, Las Meninas, the dark Goyas, and the Fusilamientos del Tres de Mayo. Video includes section on how Google took the photos. Thanks KL!]

Republished from the Duke
Original January 14th, 2009 by Randy Riddle.

Google has added the El Prado museum to Google Earth, allowing you to not only see the buildings, but to do a “virtual tour” of 14 paintings in the collections, viewing them in incredible detail – each painting is captured and presented in 14 billion pixels.

Below is a short video and you can also read a blog post at Gizmodo about the project.