Posts Tagged ‘california’

How to split up the US (Pete Search)

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

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[Editor's note: Topology analysis of the Facebook social network (how many people in one town are connected to another) overlayed on a curious map base in geographic and regrouped into regions like Greater Texas, Socalistan, and Mormonia. Not quite sure of how the author define's Pacfiica and the map suffers from poor red-green contrast but cool concept.]

Republished from Pete Search.

As I’ve been digging deeper into the data I’ve gathered on 210 million public Facebook profiles, I’ve been fascinated by some of the patterns that have emerged. My latest visualization shows the information by location, with connections drawn between places that share friends. For example, a lot of people in LA have friends in San Francisco, so there’s a line between them.

Looking at the network of US cities, it’s been remarkable to see how groups of them form clusters, with strong connections locally but few contacts outside the cluster. For example Columbus, OH and Charleston WV are nearby as the crow flies, but share few connections, with Columbus clearly part of the North, and Charleston tied to the South:

Columbus Charleston

Some of these clusters are intuitive, like the old south, but there’s some surprises too, like Missouri, Louisiana and Arkansas having closer ties  to Texas than Georgia. To make sense of the patterns I’m seeing, I’ve marked and labeled the clusters, and added some notes about the properties they have in common.

Continue reading at Pete Search . . .

50 States and 50 Metros (fake is the new real)

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

[Editor's note: Fascinating look at the cultural geography of the United States sorted by large cities and subtracted from the 50 states. For instance, considered as metros, New York city, Los Angeles, and Chicago are larger in population than the non-metropolitan portions of Texas, California, North Carolina, Florida, and Pa. The author has another good post on subway systems around the world all scaled to the same size. Thanks Jo!]

Republished from fake is the new real.
By Neil Freeman, artist and urban planner.

The fifty largest metro areas (in blue), disaggregated from their states (in orange). Each has been scaled and sorted according to population. The metro areas are US-Census defined CBSAs and MSAs.

Small sampling below. Click on image for all 100 shapes.

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Why California Is Still America’s Future (And That’s a Good Thing Too) (Time mag)

Monday, November 2nd, 2009

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[Editor's note: The cover story and map from this week's Time magazine features California made to look like a circuit board (image above).]

Republished form Time.

Despite Its Woes, California’s Dream Still Lives

California, you may have heard, is an apocalyptic mess of raging wildfires, soaring unemployment, mass foreclosures and political paralysis. It’s dysfunctional. It’s ungovernable. Its bond rating is barely above junk. It’s so broke, it had to hand out IOUs while its leaders debated how many prisoners to release and parks to close. Nevada aired ads mocking California’s business climate to lure its entrepreneurs. The media portray California as a noir fantasyland of overcrowded schools, perpetual droughts, celebrity breakdowns, illegal immigration, hellish congestion and general malaise, captured in headlines like “Meltdown on the Ocean” and “California’s Wipeout Economy” and “Will California Become America’s First Failed State?”

Actually, it won’t.

Ignore the California whinery. It’s still a dream state. In fact, the pioneering megastate that gave us microchips, freeways, blue jeans, tax revolts, extreme sports, energy efficiency, health clubs, Google searches, Craigslist, iPhones and the Hollywood vision of success is still the cutting edge of the American future — economically, environmentally, demographically, culturally and maybe politically. It’s the greenest and most diverse state, the most globalized in general and most Asia-oriented in particular at a time when the world is heading in all those directions. It’s also an unparalleled engine of innovation, the mecca of high tech, biotech and now clean tech. In 2008, California’s wipeout economy attracted more venture capital than the rest of the nation combined. Somehow its supposedly hostile business climate has nurtured Google, Apple, Hewlett-Packard, Facebook, Twitter, Disney, Cisco, Intel, eBay, YouTube, MySpace, the Gap and countless other companies that drive the way we live.

Continue to read at Time . . .

Prepping for NACIS, The World According to Ronald Reagan

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009

I’m crazy busy prepping for NACIS, wrapping up Natural Earth, and catching up on life. That being the case, I’m taking a little blog vacation. I’ll pick up posting here on the 14th of October.

In the meantime, in honor of the NACIS conference’s Sacramento location, here’s a mental map of The World According to Ronald Reagan:

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Find Water Polluters Near You (NY Times)

Monday, September 14th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Slick interactive database & mashup from the New York Times highlights facilities around the United States that fail to meet basic environmental standards. Complementary choropleth map by state takes care of regional trends. Kudos to Derek W. et al.]

Republished from The New York Times. Sept. 13, 2009.

Across the nation, the system that Congress created to protect the nation’s waters under the Clean Water Act of 1972 today often fails to prevent pollution. The New York Times has compiled data on more than 200,000 facilities that have permits to discharge pollutants and collected responses from states regarding compliance. Information about facilities contained in this database comes from two sources: the Environmental Protection Agency and the California State Water Resources Control Board. The database does not contain information submitted by the states. Full Story »

Search the database & explore the map at the New York Times . . .

Where 2.0 2010 Dates and Location Announced (O’Reilly)

Thursday, August 20th, 2009

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Republished from O’Reilly.

March 30 – April 1, 2010 at the San Jose, Marriott, CA.

The 2010 O’Reilly Where 2.0 Conference Call for Participation Is Now Open

Become Location Enabled at Where 2.0

Location awareness is everywhere now, baked into our desktops, iPhones, cameras–even our oil rigs–right from the start. We expect our tools to sense and interpret data to help us locate and visualize everything from a new restaurant to the source of a new millennium plague. Who is leading the charge to the next mapping frontier? How are companies large and small jumping in change the rules in mid-game? And where is the money?

O’Reilly Media is seeking proposals for sessions and workshops from the builders and innovators in the location industry. Are you a mobile maven creating rich information overlays? A GIS veteran mashing up temporal data with maps? An open source developer hacking up a cool visualization tool? A CIO using location information to revamp a public transit system?

If you’re passionate about enabling location awareness in our lives and our work, we want to hear from you. Submit a proposal to speak at Where 2.0 by October 13, 2009.

Topics we’ll be exploring at Where 2.0 2010 include:

  • Mobile Trends and Devices
  • Rich Analysis Tools
  • Augmented Reality
  • Temporal Information
  • Government 2.0
  • Machine Learning
  • Crisis Mapping and Disease Awareness
  • Local Search
  • Cartography
  • Geo Support in Web Application Frameworks
  • GeoStack and GeoBrowsers
  • Mapping APIs
  • GeoTargeting
  • Data Management
  • Local Search and Advertising
  • Protocols and Formats

Where 2.0 is one of the world’s foremost events dedicated to exploring the emerging technologies in the geospatial industry. At Where 2.0, we expose the tools pushing the boundaries of the location frontier, track the emergence of new business models and services, and examine new sources of data and the platforms for collecting them.

Happening March 30-April 1, 2010 at the San Jose Marriott in San Jose, California, Where 2.0 brings together the people, projects, and issues building the new technological foundations and creating value in the location industry. Join with other developers, technologists, CTOs, researchers, geographers, academics, business developers, and entrepreneurs to debate and discuss what’s viable now, and what’s lurking just below the radar. Learn more about Where 2.0.

Important Dates

The submission deadline for all proposals is October 13, 2009.
Early registration opens in December 2009.
Standard registration begins February 2010.

More information at O’Reilly . . .

All Aboard For NACIS Sacramento in October!

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

sacramentoThe program for the 2009 NACIS annual conference has been announced. The location this year is Sacramento, Calif., from Wednesday, October 7th to Saturday the 10th. I will be presenting Natural Earth Vector with Tom Patterson and crew at the Practical Cartography Day event before the main conference.

The North American Cartographic Information Society, founded in 1980, is an organization comprised of specialists from private, academic, and government organizations whose common interest lies in facilitating communication in the map information community.

Opening session speaker will be Michal Migurski, Stamen Design in San Francisco. Michal is Partner and Director of Technology Stamen, and maintains an active blog about mapping and design. Several Saturday field trips are available.

See the nation’s most spectacular scenery on the way to this year’s NACIS conference. Join Dennis McClendon and the rolling Geodweeb party train as it heads from Chicago to Sacramento. More info is available via the CartoTalk forum posting.

trainmap

Scientific Visualizations from Hillside Pictures, CA

Monday, August 3rd, 2009

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(above) Vegetation Removal: Removing vegetation from a LiDAR dataset reveals the highly detailed bare-earth topography.

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(above) Gabilan Mesa: Landscape renderings based on high resolution LiDAR data for Gabilan Mesa, an old erosional surface featuring gently sloping plateaus strongly aligned with each other along the eastern side of the Salinas Valley, CA.

[Editor's note: Scientific data visualizations and presentations using GIS data from Dorel Iordache, a northern California visual designer. Check out the videos. Thanks Sebastian!]

Republished from Hillside Pictures, Calif.

Hillside Pictures was born out of the desire to blend my lifelong passion for moving pictures and graphic design with my background in computer science and remote sensing. The results are complex visualizations of landscapes and natural environments with emphasis on both scientific accuracy and visual aesthetics. My work is grounded in broad technical expertise, highest attention to detail and years of work experience in the academic environment. Stepping outside the field of data visualization, I enjoy working on motion graphics and visual effects projects, including animated DVD menus, titles or intros.

Continue to Hillside Pictures artwork gallery . . .

Fallen Fruit: Mapping Edible Landscapes

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009

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[Editor's note: I was listening to the NPR show Splendid Table over the weekend and learned about a program in Los Angeles that maps out fruit trees in several neighborhoods and leads community outings to discover (and harvest) that edible landscape. I show a color map above but it easily reproduces in grayscale by using direct annotation (Fi for fig, etc) to augment the hue color differences. The project remind me of an early mapping project I did for my father locating fruit trees in our small orchard. John has a related post on psychogeography maps.]

Republished from Fallen Fruit. More maps.

A SPECTER is haunting our cities: barren landscapes with foliage and flowers, but nothing to eat. Fruit can grow almost anywhere,  and can be harvested by everyone. Our cities are planted with frivolous and ugly landscaping, sad shrubs and neglected trees, whereas they should burst with ripe produce. Great sums of money are spent on young trees, water and maintenance. While these trees are beautiful, they could be healthy, fruitful and beautiful.

WE ASK all of you to petition your cities and towns to support community gardens and only plant fruit-bearing trees in public parks. Let our streets be lined with apples and pears! Demand that all parking lots be landscaped with fruit trees which provide shade, clean the air and feed the people.

FALLEN FRUIT is a mapping and manifesto for all the free fruit we can find. Every day there is food somewhere going to waste. We encourage you to find it, tend and harvest it. If you own property, plant food on your perimeter. Share with the world and the world will share with you. Barter, don’t buy! Give things away! You have nothing to lose but your hunger!

View more maps . . .

Ocean Dots: The Island Encyclopedia

Tuesday, June 9th, 2009

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[Editor's note: I've enjoyed using this photo-based encyclopedia the last couple weeks working on the Natural Earth Vector island features, which includes many small specs of land out in the deep blue. Natural Earth Vector will be released at the 2009 NACIS map conference in Sacramento, Calif. Related posts: 1, 2, 3, and 4)]

oceandots.com is an image-based encyclopedia of the world’s islands and reefs, using a mix of satellite imagery and user-contributed images.

You can now upload you own island photographs to share with other visitors to the oceandots.com site. If you’d like to upload images, visit the image upload page.

Continue exploring at OceanDots . . .