Posts Tagged ‘cartogram’

Animated Cartograms via Show®USA and Show®World (MappingWorlds)

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

[Editor’s note: These new DC-based websites display a wealth of information about the fifty U.S. states and around the world. Maps are presented both as simple choropleth (color by area) and animated non-continuous area cartograms of the type promoted by Zach Johnson over at IndieMapping. Click on the map above to see it animated to the cartogram view. Thanks Rick!

Quibbles: I wish the US map was projected into a conic like Albers and the World maps were projected, too. Some of the maps deserve a per capita view to best show their thematic data. That would be more telling than a simple cartogram. Or a cartogram that was based on per capita measure would be even better.]

Republished from SHOW®USA from MappingWorlds.com
Originally published: 4 Feb. 2009.

From Spanish speakers to bales of cotton produced to number of UFO sightings, SHOW®USA (show.mappingworlds.com) displays each state’s numbers in animated, easy-to-understand maps that resize the state to the data rather than geographical area. The results are cartograms that bring the numbers to life–and reveal a few surprises.

“Look at our Tornado Deaths map, for instance,” says the site’s creator, Desmond Spruijt. “The most people killed last year by tornadoes were in Florida. It makes you wonder why it wasn’t in the Midwest, where our Tornadoes map shows the most storms. It turns out states like Oklahoma have better warning systems and more storm shelters, not to mention fewer people. The visual presentation makes you think about the data, to understand it better.”

Spruijt is founder of MappingWorlds, a company that helps government, non-profit, and business clients worldwide create innovative maps and cartograms. SHOW®USA is the sister site of SHOW®WORLD, which presents maps with data on the countries of the world in the same way.

SHOW®USA and SHOW®WORLD are free for public use, with no registration or personal information collected. Users can download the numbers behind the maps, which come from dozens of sources like the U.S. Census Bureau, capture and use an image of a map with animation, hyperlink to any map, and post comments about each one–all at no charge.

“To us, maps are more than pictures, they are communication and education tools,” says Spruijt. “We want people to use the SHOW®USA maps in slide shows or research papers, in the classroom–wherever our maps can make simple numbers come alive–and also to start conversations about them on our site. SHOW®USA and SHOW®WORLD also show off the kind of innovative maps we create for our clients at MappingWorlds.”

Spruijt founded MappingWorlds in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 2004. The company’s clients include the United Nations, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund.

The maps available on SHOW®USA touch on nearly every aspect of the land and people of America. Some of the current maps include: Hispanics, rural population, people with disabilities, drunk driving deaths, U.S. military deaths in Iraq, people without health insurance, strawberry production, natural gas reserves, casinos, federal farm support received, electoral college votes, food stamp recipients, gay marriages, murders, hate crimes, immigrants, charitable contributions, foreclosures, roller coasters, number of presidents born in each state, and Bigfoot sightings. With 141 maps so far, the site is still adding data and plans to have several hundred maps on display.

For those without Flash, JPG versions of the embedded SWF above:

Climate Change: The Carbon Atlas (Guardian)

Friday, December 19th, 2008

[Editor’s note: China has surpassed the USA as the #1 worst fossil fuels polluter in the world, according to the Guardian. They have updated their Carbon Atlas with new numbers and an interactive version, shown below (still has Dorling cartograms!). I earlier blogged about last year’s print version here. Data is from Energy Information Administration. Seen at designnotes.info. I like the little animated hand on the graphic showing that it can be interacted with.]

Republished from the Guardian.Christine Oliver, Tuesday 9 December 2008.

New figures confirm that China has overtaken the US as the largest emitter of CO2. This interactive emissions map shows how the rest of the world compares. Global C02 emissions totaled 29,195m tonnes in 2006 – up 2.4% on 2005.

Read more in the associated article at Guardian.

Parsing the Bailout (Wash Post + NY Times)

Monday, December 1st, 2008

[Editor’s note: Two visual approaches to graphing out the Federal Government’s expanding effort to “invest” in the economy during the financial crises and prevent another “Great Depression”. One from the Washington Post uses a tree map (1 | 2 | 3) approach to show all the individual parts of the bailout in relative size to each other in 1 single block. The New York Times offering uses an illustrated narrative form where each part is still scaled relative to the others but it is shown in isolation with explanation text. The two graphics are not directly comparable as they use different grouping categories. Please note the Post graphic was 3/4 of a page while I think the Times graphic was smaller.

The NY Times used a similar tree mapping approach in their recent All of Inflation’s Little Parts interactive. I’m quite taken with this approach! It reminds me of cartograms but focusing on the data topology instead of being held captive by the “shape” of countries. Countries are to most people nominal lists and when physical geography (arrangement, proximity, etc) does not influence pattern, I think this is a better approach.]

Graphics below republished from Washington Post and New York Times (story | graphic), both from 26 November 2008. Top graphic (graduated circle “bubbles”) is NY Times.

Washington Post
By Todd Lindeman and Brenna Maloney.
View larger (or click on graphic).

New York Times
By staff artist.
View larger (or click on graphic).

Country Codes of the World Map / Cartogram

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

[Editor’s note: think of Dorling Cartograms but as tag clouds. Republished from ByteLevel.com. Thanks Aly!]

Country Codes of the World

A whole new way of looking at the world

At the end of every URL and email address is a top-level domain (TLD). Although .com is the world’s most popular TLD, it is far from alone. There are more than 260 TLDs in use around the world, most of which are country code top-level domains (ccTLDs). The Country Codes of the World map includes 245 country codes, which encompasses all United Nations countries as well as numerous islands and territories. Each two-digit code is aligned over the country it represents and is color coded with the legend below for quick and easy reference.

High-quality print, suitable for framing

The map measures 24 inches by 36 inches and is printed on high-quality, 80 lb. uncoated cover stock with a one-inch margin to accommodate most frames.

Each ccTLD is sized relative to the population of the country or territory, with the exception of China and India, which were restrained by 30% to fit the layout. At the other end of the spectrum, the smallest type size used reflects those countries with fewer than 10 million residents.

This map is an excellent resource for managers of global Web sites and global marketing executives. And because there are no country borders, this map has been proven by teachers to be a valuable tool for teaching world geography.


Bulk orders. Media requests.
One company recently ordered more than a hundred copies for its global Web teams — and saved money by ordering in bulk. If you would like a price quote, please contact John Yunker.

We’re also happy to send sample copies to qualified members of the media.

Map conceived and designed by John Yunker

This map is a registered trademark of Byte Level Research, LLC. All rights reserved.

What Your Global Neighbors Are Buying (NY Times)

Wednesday, September 10th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Interactive cartogram visualization that animates between 5 categories. Consistent thematic scale throughout (color and sizing) allows quick comparison of one category to another, country to country. Very slick. Thanks Christina!]

Republished from the New York Times, September 4, 2008.

How people spend their discretionary income – the cash that goes to clothing, electronics, recreation, household goods, alcohol – depends a lot on where they live. People in Greece spend almost 13 times more money on clothing as they do on electronics. People living in Japan spend more on recreation than they do on clothing, electronics and household goods combined. Americans spend a lot of money on everything. Related Article

Shrunk down version below. View full size.

By Hannah Fairfield, Elaine He and Kevin Quealy/The New York Times.

A Map of Olympic Medals (NY Times)

Tuesday, August 5th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Supremely awesome animated and interactive Dorling cartogram based timeline showing which countries won how many Olympic medals going back to the beginning in 1896. The geography view is the cartogram. The Rank view is sized bubbles (circles) sorted by medals. Countries are color coded by continent. MouseOver has medal breakdown for the country that year. Click on a country and the full athlete details comes up below the map. Would be nice if the athlete breakdown travels along with the year slider and had an option to minimize. Thanks Laris!]

View interactive on the New York Times site . . .

Circles are sized by the number of medals each country won in past summer Olympic Games. Click on a country to display a list of its medal winners.

Graphic by: Lee Byron, Amanda Cox and Matthew Ericson/The New York Times

Related content on my blog about cartograms:

ny times dorling olympics

olympics rank

Changing Face of American Catholics (NY Times)

Wednesday, April 16th, 2008

Pope Benedict XVI arrived in Washington, DC this week. The Washington Post has been covering how his travels will affect the commute (view) and where to sit (view) in the Nationals ballpark for the 50k strong prayer meeting. The New York Times shows the larger US perspective across the last 40 years using hand-tooled cartograms and many stats (view). Move the year slider back and forth to scrub the interactive timeline.

ny times changing face of catholics

The World According to Newspapers (Cartograms)

Thursday, March 27th, 2008

(From onlinejournalismblog.com via Aly’s More than this blog)

The cartograms below show the world through the eyes of editors-in-chief, in 2007. Countries swell as they receive more media attention; others shrink as we forget them. (Flash version, more stills)

news cartogram australia

news cartogram paris

new cartogram economist

news cartogram new york times
The World in 2007 According to the New York Times, New York

These maps allow you to grasp several media trends at a glance. First, traditional newspapers are highly selective in their coverage of world news. Looking at the three British dailies, editors favour countries that are bigger and more populous, but also closer to home and better developed. They also give more room to the countries of origin of British immigrants, especially if they are white (look at the size of Australia and New-Zealand). Hardly surprising, but still disheartening, especially when you consider that the only brand that does not advocate objectivity, The Economist, covers the world more equally.

Second, we see that web-only outlets do not offer such a different view of the world. That makes sense, considering the narrowing of the news agenda on the web that was described in the Project for Excellence in Journalism’s latest report. Their lack of resources forces them to contract their scope. Smaller issues are better covered by the blogosphere, which seems unbeatable at providing niche news.

Continue reading on onlinejournalismblog.com . . .

Bugaboo Daytrips – Fanciful Cartogram and Stroller Maps

Monday, March 10th, 2008

bugaboo daytrips logoThe same folks behind the StatAttack t-shirts have another neat project for Bugaboo showcasing the many “daytrips” for stroller pushing moms and pops traveling round the globe. The daytrips come with illustrated maps by various international artists. The folks at Stollen Inc. took those maps and trips and turned them into an interactive experience built on a fanciful cartogram background. Thanks Laris.

Go explore their map…