Posts Tagged ‘cartography’

Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline (Daniel Rosenberg + Anthony Grafton)

Friday, May 7th, 2010

9781568987637

[Editor’s note: I’ve had a couple weeks with this gorgeously illustrated book. The text if readable and informative, but best of all the authors reproduce the example artwork in the flow of their text allowing easy cross-examination (even if it means digging out your magnifying glass). Buy via Powells (they only have 3 left in stock!).]

Republished from Princeton Architectural Press.

What does history look like? How do you draw time?

From the most ancient images to the contemporary, the line has served as the central figure in the representation of time. The linear metaphor is ubiquitous in everyday visual representations of time—in almanacs, calendars, charts, and graphs of all sorts. Even our everyday speech is filled with talk of time having a “before” and an “after” or being “long” and “short.” The timeline is such a familiar part of our mental furniture that it is sometimes hard to remember that we invented it in the first place. And yet, in its modern form, the timeline is not even 250 years old. The story of what came before has never been fully told, until now.

Cartographies of Time is the first comprehensive history of graphic representations of time in Europe and the United States from 1450 to the present. Authors Daniel Rosenberg and Anthony Grafton have crafted a lively history featuring fanciful characters and unexpected twists and turns. From medieval manuscripts to websites, Cartographies of Time features a wide variety of timelines that in their own unique ways—curving, crossing, branching—defy conventional thinking about the form. A fifty-four-foot-long timeline from 1753 is mounted on a scroll and encased in a protective box. Another timeline uses the different parts of the human body to show the genealogies of Jesus Christ and the rulers of Saxony. Ladders created by missionaries in eighteenth-century Oregon illustrate Bible stories in a vertical format to convert Native Americans. Also included is the April 1912 Marconi North Atlantic Communication chart, which tracked ships, including the Titanic, at points in time rather than by their geographic location, alongside little-known works by famous figures, including a historical chronology by the mapmaker Gerardus Mercator and a chronological board game patented by Mark Twain. Presented in a lavishly illustrated edition, Cartographies of Time is a revelation to anyone interested in the role visual forms have played in our evolving conception of history.

Daniel Rosenberg is associate professor of history at the University of Oregon. He has published widely on history, theory, and art, and his work appears frequently in Cabinet magazine, where he is editor-at-large. With Susan Harding, he is editor of Histories of the Future.

Anthony Grafton is the Henry Putnam University Professor at Princeton University. He is the author of numerous books on European history and also writes on a wide variety of topics for the New Republic, American Scholar, the New York Review of Books, and the New Yorker.

Read more at Princeton Architectural Press . . .

Cartography Design Annual #2 is Now Available

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

cartography_design_annual2_promo

[Editor’s note: Looking for map design inspiration? This second volume, now available from Lulu for $39.95 is brought to us by Nick Springer and a forward by Tom Patterson. Look for two Washington Post maps, one by yours truly.]

Republished from CartographyDesignAnnual.com.
By Nick Springer on December 11th, 2009

Showcasing the Art of Map Making

The Cartography Design Annual is a collection of maps from some of the top cartographers in the world capturing the beauty of mapping. Compiled and edited by Nick Springer, the Cartography Design Annual collects a select group of maps published in the calendar year 2008. The maps cover a broad spectrum of cartographic styles: 3D birds-eye views, travel maps, historic-style maps, mountain maps, and many more. The Annual is published by Springer Cartographics LLC, with support from NACIS (the North American Cartographic Information Society). The book, in beautiful full-color with an overview and detail view of each map, is both a showcase for cartographers and a interesting collection for anyone who loves maps.

The first Cartography Design Annual was received with great praise and excitement from the cartographic community and so the series continues with this second edition. With a foreword by Tom Patterson of the U.S. National Park Service in the second edition, the release Cartography Design Annual series is becoming an anticipated event for cartographers.

The book contains 30 maps from cartographers in the United States, Canada, Sweden, Norway, and Poland. This is book #2 in what will be an annual series.

The editor, Nick Springer is also the founder of Cartotalk.com, the most popular online community for cartographers worldwide. “The first edition of the Cartography Design Annual was a bit of an experiment, but all of the great feedback I received form cartographers proved that there is a need for this kind of showcase.” said Mr. Springer. “I hope this year’s edition will gain even broader exposure outside the world of cartographers.”

Mr. Springer is the Founder and President of Springer Cartographics LLC in Crosswicks, NJ and has worked for Microsoft Corporation as a Product Designer creating mapping applications and also designs software for GPS navigation systems. He studied Geography and Cartography at Syracuse University.

Buy the book from Lulu . . .

Avenza Systems Releases MAPublisher 8.1 + LabelPro

Friday, June 19th, 2009

mapublisher-header

[Editor's note: The latest update of the Illustrator plugin includes a collision-free rule based label engine, but it will cost you an extra license fee.]

Republished from Avenza.

MAPublisher 8.1 for Illustrator is powerful map production software for creating cartographic-quality maps from GIS data. Developed as a suite of plug-ins for Adobe Illustrator, MAPublisher leverages the superior graphics capabilities of this graphics design software for working with GIS data and producing high-quality maps with efficiency.

New Features of MAPublisher 8.1 for Adobe Illustrator

  • Support for the new MAPublisher LabelPro collision-free rule-based labeling system (additional license required)
  • Improved MAP Web Author Tool for automatic creation of interactive Flash maps
  • New MAPublisher Preferences options for customization of various features and functions
  • Split Layer function to move data to new layers based on attributes and expressions
  • Enhanced Expression Builder allows import of expressions from Selection Filters
  • Enhanced Plot Centroids function now has the option to copy attributes from the source area
  • New Export Attribute function for exporting the attributes table to a delimited text file
  • Enhanced Register Image function can now create a new MAP View from any referenced image
  • New Specify Anchors functionality allows world values to be entered in any co-ordinate system
  • Improved MAP View and MAP Stylesheets panels with new functionality
  • Various other user interface improvements and performance enhancements to improve usability

Continue reading about 8.1 upgrade at Avenza . . .

Features of MAPublisher LabelPro

MAPublisher® LabelPro™ offers advanced labelling capabilities beyond those available in the standard MAPublisher Feature Text Label and the MAP Tagger Tool, including a sophisticated and user-friendly rule-based and collision-free placement engine.

The MAP LabelPro engine contains sophisticated algorithms based on EZ Label technology from MapText Inc. It solves many of the most common map labelling problems such as complex conflict resolution across multiple layers, the ability to specify data as obstacles and the ability to create complex labelling conventions using user defined rules.

MAPublisher LabelPro uses map attributes, rules and styles for labelling which provides a great level of sophistication and control. Map layers may be assigned an order of priority for labelling and set as label obstacles. Labels can be placed on any defined text layers, unplaceable layers can be ignored or placed. Placement rules and styles can be saved to a file and imported or shared over a network.

Users can use the following rules and placement options to place the text on their maps.

Continue reading about LabelPro at Avenza . . .

IndieProjector for KML and Shapefiles (IndieMapper)

Monday, June 1st, 2009

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indieprojector3

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[Editor's note: The brilliant folks at AxisMaps have done it again with this free online tool for reprojecting KML and shapefiles.]

Republished from Axis Maps / IndieMapper.

Indieprojector is a free web service that re-projects digital map files and converts them to SVG for use in vector graphics editing software. Map projections are an essential part of map making but we found the existing tools to be too expensive, inflexible or complicated. Indieprojector is the smarter, easier, more elegant way to reproject and convert geographic data. It’s a preview of our indiemapper technology that will bring map-making into the 21st century using web-services and a realtime visual approach to cartographic design.

Read more and watch demo screencast . . .

Go directly to IndieProjector to reproject your KML and shapefiles . . .

Third-party Plug-ins for Illustrator (Adobe)

Monday, March 16th, 2009

My list of plugins useful for cartographer’s and Freehand-hands has been featured in Adobe’s list of 3rd party plugin developers. Plugins are cross-listed in the following categories (or view by developer):

Conference Announcement: 1st ICA Symposium “True-3D in Cartography”

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

Please note that the deadline for abstract submission for the 1st International ICA/DGfK Symposium “True-3D in Cartography” which will be held at Dreikönigskirche Conference Centre, Dresden, 24-28  August 2009, has been extended until 31 March 2009.

Below you find the list of envisaged topics:

  • Anaglyph Displays
  • Animated True 3D
  • CAVEs
  • Chromo-Stereoscopy
  • CNC Relief-Milling
  • Earth Relief Globes
  • E-Paper and True 3D
  • Hand-Made Geomodels
  • Analogue Holography
  • Digital Holography
  • Hyperglobes
  • Lenticular Foil Technology
  • Polarisation Technology
  • Relief-Molding Technology
  • Solid State Geomodels
  • Shutter Glass Technology
  • Stereo-Lithography
  • Virtual Environments
  • 3D Printing etc.

Please, find more information at the conference web site: http://kartographie.geo.tu-dresden.de/true3Dincartography09/

For any other specific information concerning the conference you can contact steffi.sharma@tu-dresden.de.
Feel free to forward this message to all colleagues who might be interested in this ICA meeting.

Looking forward to seeing you in Dresden in August 2009.

Manfred Buchroithner

Manfred Buchroithner

Also check out these two blog posts to get a feel for the type of content and people who attend this type of conference:

Meet Toni Mair — Terrain Artist Extraordinaire

2008 Mountain Cartography Confernce in Switzerland Approaches

Online maps ‘wiping out history’ (BBC)

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008

[Editor’s note: Perhaps a bit alarmist but does point to the changing role of maps from conveyances of static sets of edited knowledge into a digital tabla rasa that displays the “where” of an individual user’s search results. Cultural landmarks that used to be included on maps for spatial orientation and perhaps a bit of boosterism are being left off the initial view. Users now have to know a feature exists before it is shown to them or ask for a certain overlay layer. But perhaps this is a reflection, too, on a society where the mainstream has been turned into 1000 separate channels? Or a jaded appreciation of information overload instead leaves us with a dirth of map information. Perhaps cartographic editors are good, after all. Thanks Curt!]

Reprinted from the BBC.

Internet mapping is wiping the rich geography and history of Britain off the map, the president of the British Cartographic Society has said.

Mary Spence said internet maps such as Google and Multimap were good for driving but left out crucial data people need to understand a landscape.

Mrs Spence was speaking at the Institute of British Geographers conference in London.

Google said traditional landmarks were still mapped but must be searched for.

Ms Spence said landmarks such as churches, ancient woodlands and stately homes were in danger of being forgotten because many internet maps fail to include them.

Ordnance Survey map of central London. BBC licence number 100019855, 2008.

Traditional maps feature landmarks such as museums and art galleries

She said: “Corporate cartographers are demolishing thousands of years of history – not to mention Britain’s remarkable geography – at a stroke by not including them on maps which millions of us now use every day.

“We’re in real danger of losing what makes maps so unique, giving us a feel for a place even if we’ve never been there.”

Projects such as Open Street Map, through which thousands of Britons have contributed their local knowledge to map pubs, landmarks and even post boxes online, are the first step in the fight back against “corporate blankwash”, she added.

Missing landmarks

By way of example, Ms Spence said that if someone walked around the South Kensington area of London, they would encounter landmarks such as the Science Museum, Royal Albert Hall and the Natural History Museum, which could not be found on Google Maps.

Elsewhere, Worcester Cathedral and Tewkesbury Abbey are not on their respective Google Maps.

Mary Spence and Adrian Miles discuss internet mapping

“But it’s not just Google – it’s Nokia, Microsoft, maps on satellite navigation tools. It’s diluting the quality of the graphic image that we call a map.”

Ms Spence believes that the consequence will be long-term damage to future generations of map readers, because this skill is not being taught in schools and people are simply handling “geographical data”.

But Ed Parsons, geospatial technologist at Google, said the way in which people used maps was changing.

He said: “Internet maps can now be personalised, allowing people to include landmarks and information that is of interest to them.

“Anyone can create their own maps or use experiences to collaborate with others in charting their local knowledge.

“These traditional landmarks are still on the map but people need to search for them. Interactive maps will display precisely the information people want, when they want it.

“You couldn’t possibly have everything already pinpointed.”

Update Your Maps: Nigeria cedes Bakassi to Cameroon (BBC)

Thursday, August 14th, 2008

Nigeria has handed over the potentially oil-rich Bakassi peninsula to Cameroon, bringing an end to a long-standing dispute over the territory.

Reprinted from the BBC. Thursday, 14 August 2008.) Thanks Patterson!

The handover ceremony was moved from the peninsula’s main town to Calabar in Nigeria amid security concerns.

Over the past year about 50 people have been killed in clashes.

The majority of the local population considers itself Nigerian, but an international court ruled in favour of Cameroon in 2002.

The BBC’s Abdullahi Kaura in Calabar says there are unconfirmed reports that militants have attacked a boat travelling to Abana, the main town on the Bakassi peninsula.

 

Unresolved pain at Bakassi handover

Nigerian security sources said between three and seven people were killed when militants ambushed the boat as it made its way from Cameroon.

Correspondents say security had been beefed up ahead of the ceremony.

On the Cameroonian side, there have been celebrations as people moved back into the peninsula.

In recent years, at least 100,000 people have moved from the peninsula to Nigeria, local leaders say.

The International Court of Justice ruling was based on an early 19th century colonial agreement between Britain and Germany.

Nigeria challenged the ruling, but finally agreed to relinquish the territory two years ago.

“The gains made in adhering to the rule of law may outweigh the painful losses of ancestral homes,” said the head of the Nigerian delegation at the ceremony, Attorney General Mike Aondoakaa.

Part of the territory was handed over to Cameroon two years ago.

Revellers

A spokesman for Nigerian President Umaru Yar’Adua said the process was “painful… for everyone including the president”, but added that Nigeria had made “a commitment to the international community and we have a responsibility to keep it”.

 

Map

Cameroon said the final handover would mark “the end of a crisis”.

On the beaches of the northern part of the island there were parties and celebrations as Cameroonians prepared to go into the last section to be turned over to them.

“We are going straight to the place, and we’re going to be happy,” one reveller told the BBC’s Randy Joe Sa’ah in Bakassi.

But in Nigeria there is still bitterness about the deal.

“The government has abandoned its duties,” said Kayode Fasitere, the lawyer acting for some displaced from Bakassi who sought to have the handover delayed.

The transfer of Bakassi had been described by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon as “a model for negotiated settlements of border disputes”.

A group of Bakassi leaders have been seeking compensation from the Nigerian government.

About 90% of the area’s population, estimated at up to 300,000, is made up of Nigerian fishermen.

About 30,000 of the residents have moved out to an area in Cross Rivers State set aside for them, but it has no access to the sea, campaigners say.

Bakassi has a rich fishing culture and people say the handover has destroyed their way of life.

The Bakassi peninsula juts out into the Gulf of Guinea close to the Niger Delta.

Its offshore waters are thought to contain substantial oil fields – untapped because of the border dispute – which Nigeria and Cameroon will now work together to explore.

How Tag Clouds Work (indiemaps.com)

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008

Zach Johnson has a good post about how Tag Clouds work from a cartographic perspective on his indiemaps.com blog. While we have been trained to scale objects based on their area, he concludes tag clouds might be best scaled by size (height) alone.

I have done some Illustrator scipting that take into account the ink area and the raw results are unsatisfactory and must be scaled again by the width of the tag character count to still make visual sense. All this work does not significantly change how the tag cloud is read (indeed, it may make it harder) and must be done in a graphics environment like Illustrator or Flash (not simple HTML).

Read Zach’s full post here…

zack johnson tag cloud

Great interactive Caribbean travel map

Sunday, November 4th, 2007

I’m very impressed with this NY Times map that ran last weekend:
http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/10/28/travel/28curacao.html
(follow the “click to explore venues” link in their left sidebar)

Caribbean Map – New York Times

On the surface, this map is a Flash-based interactive graphic that makes use of Google maps thru a “mashup” (inside of Flash) enabling the cartographer to use Google for the detailed street and satellite maps to plot features (like travel points of interest) onto. This information is often more detailed than the databases we have and can quickly be deployed. The downside is the “look” is Google and after awhile, every mashup seems to look alike.

But this NY Times example uses custom map icons and mouseOver effects to good use to distinguish itself. And you can’t even tell it’s a mashup at first view. It starts with a regional Caribbean map (custom NY Times cartography) and then zooms into the specific country before fading to the Google mashup.

This map is also well integrated into it’s host page. In-line with each point of interest description in the HTML is a link back to the map. When the user clicks on the “MAP” link, the photo on the top of the page changes to the interactive map, zooms in, and displays that feature, even if the map wasn’t displayed at first.

Excellent interactive!