Posts Tagged ‘Charting’

How Different Groups Spend Their Day (NY Times)

Monday, December 28th, 2009

[Editor's note: I missed this interactive from The New York Times over the summer. "Sleeping, eating, working, and watching TV takes up about two-thirds of the average day." Delve into the chart by isolating either by activity or by groupings of survey participants. Roll over the chart with your mouse to discover the percentage numbers by time.]

Republished from the New York Times. July 31, 2009.

The American Time Use Survey asks thousands of American residents to recall every minute of a day. Here is how people over age 15 spent their time in 2008. Related article
Interact with the original at the New York Times . . .
(Screenshot below) By By SHAN CARTER, AMANDA COX, KEVIN QUEALY and AMY SCHOENFELD.
nyt_time_use_charting

Affordable Housing Mashup (Envisioning Development)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

wholiveshere

[Editor's note: Google mashup with fun charting trying to make sense out of simple yet complicated subject.]

Republished from EnvisioningDevelopment.net.

“Affordable Housing.” The phrase seems plain enough, but it doesn’t always mean what people think it does! It actually has a technical government definition that can determine what gets built and who lives there. Use these tools to answer the all-important question: “Affordable to whom?

What Is Affordable Housing? from the Center for Urban Pedagogy on Vimeo.

A stop-action animation on the technical definitions of affordable housing — by Rosten Woo and John Mangin of CUP, animator/designer Jeff Lai, and Glen Cummings of MTWTF. Narrated by Lisa Burriss. Sound by Rosten Woo.

How Treasury spent its bailout funds (Wash Post)

Monday, December 7th, 2009

tarp_112809

[Editor's note: Todd's flow map of TARP spending. It's a charting beautify. I'm catching up on a couple week's of posts while Natural Earth was in its final stretch.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Saturday 28 Nov., 2009.

The Troubled Assets Relief Program, or TARP, was designed to stabilize the financial system as well as aid homeowners and small businesses in the wake of the credit crisis. The Treasury Department has until the end of the year to renew the controversial program. Of the $700 billion that was authorized, $560.7 billion was planned for various programs. About $71 billion has been returned from financial firms and about another $10 billion has been paid in interest and dividends.

SOURCES: Treasury Department, reporting by The Washington Post

DAVID CHO, TODD LINDEMAN AND APRIL UMMINGER/THE WASHINGTON POST

INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC: The Post 200 Database (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, May 13th, 2009

gr2009051202461

[Editor’s note: Uses the Flare visualization API in Flash ActionScript 3 to display data about the Post 200 companies in a treemap format. A vexing and il-documented API, but powerful. We considered showing the data with a graduated circle map but the company locations were too clustered for that to be effective.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
13 May 2009. By Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso and Terri Rupar – The Washington Post

Use our interactive graphic to explore data — including revenue and employment — for the top companies in the Washington area.

Boxes represent individual companies grouped together by sector, size based on data.

View the interactive version at The Washington Post . . .

post200interactive

Nightingale’s roses in ActionScript 3 (indiemaps)

Tuesday, November 11th, 2008

[Editor's note: Zach Johnson demonstrates how to create animated coxcomb charts in Flash/Flex AS3.]

Republished from IndieMaps.org.

[Zach has] long been a sucker for the polar area/coxcomb/rose charts popularized by Florence Nightingale. These multivariate charts can show ordered or unordered categorical data. As noted in an Economist piece on influential information graphics,

As with today’s pie charts, the area of each wedge is proportional to the figure it stands for, but it is the radius of each slice (the distance from the common centre to the outer edge) rather than the angle that is altered to achieve this.

I wanted to produce some just for kicks, so looked around for a script in AS3. No dice. OK, any language? Didn’t see anything. So I sat on the idea for a while and then finally thought up the technique that made producing them in AS3 quite easy. With the resultant classes, producing graphics like the following small multiples of U.S. soldier deaths in Iraq is a snap. The classes are written in AS3, so can be used with Flash, Flex, or mxmlc. All the example screenshots below are PNGs captured from SWFs produced with only AS3 (extended Sprites). To see the code (which includes a lot of ugly annotation), click ‘view source‘ below any image. All source code is included in the ZIP distribution linked below.

(more…)

Geography Histogram of Election Topics (NY Times)

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008

The New York Times featured this delectable toy (tool) on their home page for a few hours on Tuesday. The compact Flash interactive shows a dynamic histogram stacking the average opinion of voters on Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton per state on a series of election focused topics. The states are represented with little squares that stack into histogram bars.

If a state falls somewhere between 20 and 29% then it it will stack in the “20s” column with other states that fall in that column. The election topics are accessed by a listing below the histogram or the user can flip thru them with next and previous buttons.

The horizontal and then vertical easing of the state histogram boxes on change of topic is a beautiful dance. Props to Shan Carter and Amanda Cox. Thanks Christina!

Social Networks’ Sway May Be Underestimated (Washington Post)

Thursday, May 29th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Graphic shows not physical geography but a topological network of social friendships and how smokers used to be at the center of social networks but are now more isolated. If someone becomes a smoker than it cascades thru the social network, but if someone quits smoking, it can have a similar effect by influencing others in the crowd to quit. The program used to make the graphic is called Pajek. Thanks Patterson!]

smokers quiting social network wash post

Reprinted from The Washington Post. By Rob Stein, Staff Writer. Monday, May 26, 2008.

Facebook, MySpace and other Web sites have unleashed a potent new phenomenon of social networking in cyberspace. But at the same time, a growing body of evidence is suggesting that traditional social networks play a surprisingly powerful and underrecognized role in influencing how people behave.

The latest research comes from Nicholas A. Christakis, a medical sociologist at the Harvard Medical School, and James H. Fowler, a political scientist at the University of California at San Diego. The pair reported last summer that obesity appeared to spread from one person to another through social networks, almost like a virus or a fad.

In a follow-up to that provocative research, the team has produced similar findings about another major health issue: smoking. In a study published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, the team found that a person’s decision to kick the habit is strongly affected by whether other people in their social network quit — even people they do not know. And, surprisingly, entire networks of smokers appear to quit virtually simultaneously.

Taken together, these studies and others are fueling a growing recognition that many behaviors are swayed by social networks in ways that have not been fully understood. And it may be possible, the researchers say, to harness the power of these networks for many purposes, such as encouraging safe sex, getting more people to exercise or even fighting crime.

“What all these studies do is force us to start to kind of rethink our mental model of how we behave,” said Duncan Watts, a Columbia University sociologist. “Public policy in general treats people as if they are sort of atomized individuals and puts policies in place to try to get them to stop smoking, eat right, start exercising or make better decisions about retirement, et cetera. What we see in this research is that we are missing a lot of what is happening if we think only that way.”

For both of their studies, Christakis and Fowler took advantage of detailed records kept between 1971 and 2003 about 5,124 people who participated in the landmark Framingham Heart Study. Because many of the subjects had ties to the Boston suburb of Framingham, Mass., many of the participants were connected somehow — through spouses, neighbors, friends, co-workers — enabling the researchers to study a network that totaled 12,067 people.

When researchers analyzed the patterns of those who managed to quit smoking over the 32-year period, they found that the decision appeared to be highly influenced by whether someone close to them stopped. A person whose spouse quit was 67 percent more likely to kick the habit. If a friend gave it up, a person was 36 percent more likely to do so. If a sibling quit, the chances increased by 25 percent.

A co-worker had an influence — 34 percent — only if the smoker worked at a small firm. The effects were stronger among the more educated and among those who were casual or moderate smokers. Neighbors did not appear to influence each other, but friends did even if they lived far away.

“You appear to have to have a close relationship with the person for it to be influential,” Fowler said.

But the influence of a single person quitting nevertheless appeared to cascade through three degrees of separation, boosting the chance of quitting by nearly a third for people two degrees removed from one another.

“It could be your co-worker’s spouse’s friend or your brother’s spouse’s co-worker or a friend of a friend of a friend. The point is, your behavior depends on people you don’t even know,” Christakis said. “Your actions are partially affected by the actions of people who are beyond your social horizon” — but in the broader network.

In addition, the researchers found that the size of smokers’ own networks did not change over time, even though the overall number of smokers plummeted, from 45 percent to 21 percent of the population during that time. The researchers realized that what happened was that entire networks of smokers would quit almost simultaneously.

Continue reading . . .

Data Visualisation Blogs You Might Not Know About

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008

This list is lifted straight from Tom Carden’s blog earlier this month (visit his post). Thanks Peter!

 

Primary Jam — Wall Street Journal Graphic

Tuesday, January 1st, 2008

With Iowa voting later this week, the 2008 presidential primary election season will be open and in full swing (really, not just taunting like the last 102 weeks). Conventional wisdom says the first states can make or break a candidate’s chances of actually landing their party’s nomination to the White House’s office.

This Wall Street Journal graphic diagrams how certain caucuses have moved forward (or fallen behind) on the calendar as states jockey to have the most impact on the nominating process. States are represented by circles which are graduated in size on the timelines to represent that state’s electoral votes and by an alphabetical listing (by two digit postal code) at top. Both the graduated circles and the postal code buttons are interactive revealing more information on mouseOver. Restrained animation is provided when navigating the graphic as some circles change color or size up to full volume. A link back to the article that originally spawned the graphic is provided (well, section front).

Nitpicks: the mouseOver effects on the graduated circles should have been above or below the circle, not left or right. This would allow the next few caucuses to be viewed in sequence. The present method obscures this information. Fonts size is small on my screen, almost to the point of illegibility. I would have liked to see the state names spelled out fully in the mouseOver boxes. The postal code abbreviations used in the keyboard buttons above the graphic (the index) are effective, but the full names should be provided here too. The representation of Super Tuesday is effective but the large circle shape is slightly deflated in 2000.

Primary Jam — Wall Street Journal Graphic

NY Times – Naming Names (Presidential Campaign 2008)

Tuesday, December 18th, 2007

ny times naming names campaign presidential 2008

This NY Times graphic shows how often the presidential candidates reference each other (Naming Names). There is some mouseOver Flash effects as each candidate’s name is highlighted. What interests me is the link lines between candidates. The “paired location” links were generated out of a gnome visualization program called Circos. From their website:

Circos uses a circular composition of ideograms to mitigate the fact that some data, like combinations of intra- and inter-chromosomal relationships are very difficult to organize when the underlying ideograms are arranged as lines. In many cases, it is impossible to keep the relationship lines from crossing other structures and this deteriorates the effectiveness of the graphic.

Graphic brought to you by Jonathan Corum and Farhana Hossain. Disclosure: Farhana and I once worked together at The Washington Post.