Posts Tagged ‘choropleth’

ColorBrewer in ArcMap, updated to version 2.0 (via Weary Ramblings)

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

cb2

[Editor's note: Struggling to pick colors in ArcMap or need to ensure your design meets federal accessibility standards for vision impairment? ColorBrewer.org has been updated to version 2.0 and now a ArcMap plugin brings some functionality right into your GIS. It's not clear to me if the "Terrain overlay" option for previewing the colors takes into account the muted nature / secondary HSV mixing of the colors, I don't recommend using that part just yet.]

Republished from National Cancer Institute.
Seen at Weary Ramblings.

ColorTool is a plugin for ArcMap™ (part of the ESRI ArcGIS Desktop suite) that helps users create choropleth maps using ColorBrewer color ramps.

The program runs from a button in the toolbar and opens a form that guides the user in choosing a classification scheme. For more information on the color options, visit ColorBrewer.org. ColorTool supports Quantile, Equal Interval, Natural Breaks (Jenks), and Unique Value classification types.

Download the ColorTool plugin . . .

Along with the plugin, the main ColorBrewer site has been upgraded to version 2.0

Republished from Free Geography Tools.

ColorBrewer is an online Flash app designed to help select appropriate data coloring schemes for maps, including sequential (choropleths), diverging (data with break points), and qualitative (discrete categorical data). I’ve covered version 1.0 before, and now ColorBrewer 2.0 is out. Not a huge number of functional differences, but some useful additions (and one disappointing subtraction):

  • More parameters are selected by drop-down boxes instead of buttons; bit faster this way
  • All controls are on the left side, making them easier to find
  • You can now choose between a colored background and a terrain background
  • Color transparency can now be set between 0 and 100%
  • More choices for background, road, city and border colors
  • You can now screen color schemes by appropriateness for color blindness, photocopying and print. In version 1.0, you only had icons showing which uses were appropriate, and these are still available in the “Score Card” tab at lower right
  • More options for color scheme export directly from the program, including an Excel file of all available color schemes, export in Adobe Swatch Exchange format (ASE), and in-program text hex color codes for copying and pasting into graphics programs.
  • No more map zoom; I miss this option.

Who Supports Health Care Reform (NY Times)

Friday, January 29th, 2010

[Editor’s note: Op-Art from the New York Times showing who (which states) supports and opposes health care reform grouped by age and income. Data from 2004, so not current but still informative. Thanks Martin!]

Republished from the New York Times. Nov. 18, 2009.

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A Peek Into Netflix Queues (NY Times)

Monday, January 11th, 2010

[Editor's note: Props to Matthew and Amanda at the New York Times for this Google Maps mashup by zip code (choropleth) of common Netflix rentals in selected U.S. metros. Easy to use interface based on Flash API still allows advanced options for sorting and mouseOver of "neighborhood" zipcodes  returns movie watching profile. Far more interesting than dry census stats ;)]

Republished from the New York Times.

Examine Netflix rental patterns, neighborhood by neighborhood, in a dozen cities. Some titles with distinct patterns are Mad Men, Obsessed and Last Chance Harvey.

Interact with the original at the New York Times . . . (Screenshot below.)

nytimes_netflixmap

By Matthew Bloch, Amanda Cox, Jo Craven McGinty and Kevin Quealy/The New York Times

Unemployment rate by county (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, December 7th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Kudos to Kat Downs for wiring up this interactive, zoomable map of the United States showing unemployment rate by county. There’s a slider to see data back in time. I did the base map using my map generalization skills honed on Natural Earth. Using data that is appropriately generalized for the display scale cuts down on file size and reduces lag before data display.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Dec. 3, 2009

unemploymentmap
SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics; GRAPHIC: Kat Downs, Mary Kate Cannistra and Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso – The Washington Post, December 3, 2009

Announcing IndieMapper (Axis Maps)

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009

[Editor’s note: The same folks at Axis Maps who brought us Finder! and Maker! from GeoCommons (blog post) announce IndieMapper, a new tool for cartographers by cartographers to make awesome maps. When released (summer 2009?), this online, Flash-based solution will fill a nitch between full bore GIS systems and manual compilation in Illustrator. I hope they’ll add an “embed this map” option for people who want to publish their maps straight to the web for their 2.0 release. Screenshots below.]

Republished from the Axis Maps IndieMapper blog.
Add yourself to their email list to get the 411 on the first release.

Note: David Heyman of Axis Maps was at SXSW Interactive 2009 this weekend in the NeoCartography: Mapping Design and Usability Evolved session.

Welcome to indiemapper.com! We’re very excited that you’ve taken the time to learn about our project. Put your email address in the subscription box below so we can tell you about indiemapper developments and most importantly… the launch!

A little about indiemapper:

  1. It’s big. We’re not satisfied with the current tools available for making maps. They’re too expensive and their cartographic functionality doesn’t always give us everything we need. We’re building indiemapper to replace those tools. It takes in shapefiles and spits out a vector file to Illustrator, just like GIS. It supports multiple projections, just like GIS. Labeling, map layout, data classification, just like GIS. If you need it to make a map, it’s in there.
  2. It’s focused. The problem with the existing tools for making maps is that they aren’t designed exclusively for making maps. You’re only using about 10% of the software to make your map (but paying for all 100%). We built indiemapper for only one purpose: making maps.
  3. It’s visual. If I want to reclassify my data, why do I need to go into the map properties dialog box, select the symbology tab, click on the data classification button that opens up a new window, move the tabs around in that new window, click OK in the new window, click OK in the first window I opened and then wait for my map to redraw to see if the classification looks good? With indiemapper, every update is live and every control is easily accessible. No more hunting. No more waiting.
  4. It’s online. Updates are available as soon as they’re released. No more waiting for service packs or paying for upgrades. And Mac users: Get ready… we are 100% platform independent. Use it on a Mac, use it on Windows, even try out Linux (you might like it!)

I could go on and on, and I will, right here on this blog. Check back here for a discussion on functionality, coding, design, cartography, all things indiemapper. We’ll be releasing some free tools along the way that we’ll want to tell you about too. Most importantly, we want your feedback so let us have it!

Top features:
  • Fast, visual editing.
  • Nothing more than 2 clicks away.
  • Rolling release with constant updates.
  • Choropleth mapping.
  • Dot density mapping.
  • Proportional symbol mapping.
  • Cartograms.
  • Unlimited undos.
  • Colors from ColorBrewer.
  • Type from TypeBrewer.
  • Basemaps from Natural Earth.
  • Map layout for print and screen.
  • Load data from shapefile and KML formats.
  • Export to vector SVG.
  • Export to JPG.
Screenshots:
PROJECTIONS:
  • Visual selection process
  • Re-project vector data on-the-fly
  • Filter by projections that preserve area / shape / direction
  • Learn more about projection best practices
  • Create custom standard lines / centering
DATA LAYERS:
  • Manage multiple thematic data layers
  • Create new layers on-the-fly from attributes of existing datasets
  • Control editability / visibility
  • Instantly access style / label options for each data layer
CHOROPLETH MAPS
  • Create both classed and unclassed choropleth maps
  • Select from built-in automatic classification routines or set your own breaks
  • Visually set manual class breaks using interactive live-updating histogram
  • Automatically select built-in ColorBrewer color ramps
  • Create your own custom color ramps
  • Every change is updated on the map instantly

Self-Colored Map Graphics (Free Geography Tools)

Friday, March 13th, 2009

[Editor's note: Mike bugged me back in January to cover his free tool to easily color a world map by country and download the resulting PNG image file. I notice that the Free Geography Tools blog has covered the same. Check it out below. Would be nice if the world map were projected (like Winkle Tripel).]

Republished from Free Geography Tools.
Originally published Feb. 5, 2009.

A while back, I covered a web app that lets you color in countries on a world map, then download the resulting graphic. Since then, it’s added more features, including the ability to add text, lines and labels. Mike Piaget writes to tell me of a similar app he’s created, the Customizable Map Of The World. Not as many options as the other app, but easier to use:

2-4-2009-1.48.12 PM

Click on a color next to the country name, then click “Update Map Colors” to color the country on the map; here, I’ve colored all world countries that start with the letter “A”. There’s only six colors available for country colors (including the default), plus one for water, but you can modify those colors with the appropriate hex code at upper right. To save a copy of the map to your computer, right-click on the image and choose the “Save Picture As ..” option (or the equivalent in your browser):

chart

Unfortunately, you’re limited to the single on-screen size; however, there are closeup maps available for the subregions Africa, Europe, Asia, the Middle East and South America (links at the bottom of the web app page).

Continue to Aneki to use the tool . . .

Interactive Map: Immigration Explorer (NY Times)

Thursday, March 12th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Part of their Remade in America series, this interactive map from the New York Times shows where select foreign-born groups have settled across the United States for the last 100 years. Find trends by ethnic group, zoom into individual states, query data values by county, and view historic data. Interactive leverages mapping toolset developed the last year at the Times for their impressive presidential election coverage. Thanks Geoff!]

Republished from The New York Times.
March 10, 2009. No credit given. 

Screenshots below. Interact with the Flash version at New York Times . . .

Related content: Times Topic |  Opinion blog | Diversity in the Classroom 

(below) All groups as percent of population (choropleth by area) 

(below) All groups as number of residents (graduated circles) 

(below) Default “All Countries” view can be changed to focus on a specific country of origin.  

 

(below) Focused on people born in China. 

Continue to interact with the Flash version at New York Times . . .

Sources: Social Explorer, www.socialexplorer.com; Minnesota Population Center; U.S. Census Bureau