Posts Tagged ‘curt’

Colorado Road Conditions Mashup (CDOT)

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

screen-shot-2010-03-24-at-103539-pm

[Editor’s note: Check out the snowy road conditions in Colorado with this mashup that includes current road open/close as well as surface status (icy, blowing snow, etc). One of the best I’ve seen. Traffic cameras are overlayed with auto clustering of nearby markers. Includes a searchable list and good legend below the map. Hard to scroll wheal up and down on the page due to the map and list view. And resizing makes it hard to get the legend on the same viewable window area as the map. Thanks Curt!]

Continue onto Colorado Road Conditions . . .

The World Map of Small Towns (VladStudio)

Monday, January 25th, 2010

[Editor’s note: VladStudio has some great map-themed desktop images. This new project was inspired from airplane moving maps but instead of showing the big metros emphasizes tiny settlements and Vlad dedicates it to Antoine de Saint Exupéry. Thanks Curt!]

Get this iPhone and desktop optimized wallpaper from VladStudio . . .

vladstudio_world_map_small_towns_800x480

This Map Zooms In As You Unfold (Wired)

Sunday, January 24th, 2010

[Editor's note: Seen over at Gizmodo. Thanks Curt!]

Pinch to zoom? Nah. Try unfold to zoom. The Map2, a “zoomable map on paper,” is a clever invention that packs more detailed maps underneath its folds.

Continue reading at Wired . . .

Chinese censoreship “map”

Friday, January 15th, 2010

[Editor's note: China's government censoreship and web practices have been in the news this week after Google threatened to pull out of the country. This map / tag cloud / art piece highlights forbidden topics and websites inside China. Thanks Curt!]

Republished from Gizmodo.

Manhattan Mapped Without a Horizon (Gizmodo)

Thursday, May 7th, 2009

uptownmap

[Editor’s note: A novel map projection based more on a fish-eye lens topology of near and far from both uptown and downtown perspectives. Thanks Melissa and Curt!]

Republished from Gizmodo.
By Mark Wilson, Tue May 5 2009.

It’s rare that we get excited over maps, but this idea by graphic designers Jack Schulze and Matt Webb would be great for GPSs, combining 3D, first person and overhead views into one übermap.

The art project, called Here & There, bends the world into horizon-less, roller coaster loop topography, which allows the viewer to see their position from the first person perspective (complete with those 3D buildings that usually just get in the way) alongside the route/terrain to come.

For now, the designers’ work is available in limited edition prints only that go for $65 (per a set of two). But we can still dream that someone like Google, Apple or Garmin might come around and drop a big pile of money on the small agency before automating this visualization for real time navigation. [Here & There and Background Info via FastCompany]

Website maps surnames worldwide (BBC)

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008

A website which maps global surnames has been launched to help people find the origins of their name and how far it may have spread.

[Editor’s note: Originally published August 30th but the site was hit so hard I did not promote at the time. Thanks Curt and Laris!]

Visit the site at: http://www.publicprofiler.org/worldnames/

The Public Profiler site plots eight million last names using data from electoral rolls and phone directories.

The site covers 300 million people in 26 countries, showing the origins of names and where families have moved to.

David Beckham, for example, has an English name, but there are more Beckhams in the US than Britain.

But the region of the world with the highest concentration of people called Beckham was even further from the footballer’s east London origins – in the New Zealand province of Northland.

The site – www.publicprofiler.org/worldnames – also reveals which of the five million forenames are most closely associated with different surnames and lists the top regions and cities for each surname.

A name is now not just a statement of who you are but where you are
Professor Paul Longley

It was developed by a team of geographers from University College London.

Professor Paul Longley, one of the researchers, said: “The information is not just historical but geographical.

“We can link names to places – a name is now not just a statement of who you are but where you are.”

Most surnames originated in specific places in the world and remain most frequent in those areas, but have often spread to other countries because of migration, the research showed.

Searches for Britain’s three multi-gold medallists at the recent Olympics and the leaders of the three main political parties revealed some mixed results.

• Swimmer Rebecca Adlington’s surname is most prevalent in New Zealand

• Cyclist Chris Hoy’s surname is Irish but more common in Denmark

• Cyclist Bradley Wiggins’s surname is most popular in the US

• Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s surname tops the list in Australia

• Conservative leader David Cameron’s surname is most prevalent in New Zealand

• Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg’s surname is still most common in Britain

Prof Longley said that the site was currently struggling to cope with demand.

“We are being deluged with requests and we ask people to be patient. There is obviously a lot of interest in family names and family history globally,” he said.

Here are some example maps of my surname (Kelso):

Jeans World Map (Vlad Studio)

Monday, September 29th, 2008

Looking for a busy desktop picture / wallpaper to impress the coworkers? Try this map art from Vlad Studio featuring a denim fabric and selected country boundaries stitched in. Many sizes and resolutions for a variety of displays including dual monitors. Thanks Curt!

Download from Vlad Studio . . .

Interface design and the iPhone (Tufte)

Sunday, June 29th, 2008

From edwardtufte.com. View original. Thanks Curt!

The iPhone platform elegantly solves the design problem of small screens by greatly
intensifying the information resolution of each displayed page. Small screens, as on
traditional cell phones, show very little information per screen, which in turn leads
to deep hierarchies of stacked-up thin information–too often leaving users with
“Where am I?” puzzles. Better to have users looking over material adjacent in space
rather than stacked in time.

To do so requires increasing the information resolution of the screen by the hardware
(higher resolution screens) and by screen design (eliminating screen-hogging
computer administrative debris, and distributing information adjacent in space).

This video shows some of the resolution-enhancing methods of the iPhone, along
with a few places for improvements in resolution.

(This is a 56mb file; it might take a while to load.
The video is essential to the essay as is the still-land material below.)

… View video … (opens new window with original Tufte post)

In 1994-1995 I [Tufte] designed (while consulting for IBM) screen mock-ups for navigating
through the National Gallery via information kiosks. (The National Gallery had the
good sense not to adopt the proposal.) For several years these screen designs were
handouts in the one-day course in my discussion of interface design, and were then
published in my book Visual Explanations (1997).

The design ideas here include high-resolution touch-screens; minimizing computer
admin debris; spatial distribution of information rather than temporal stacking;
complete integration of text, images, and live video; a flat non-hierarchical
interface; and replacing spacious icons with tight words. The metaphor for the
interface is the information. Thus the iPhone got it mostly right.

Here are pages 146-150 from Visual Explanations (1997):

Continue reading at Tufte.com . . .

Presidential Watch – Map of the Political Blogosphere

Wednesday, June 25th, 2008

I’m on a topology kick so today’s “map” shows the links between 533 different websites and blogs focused on the 2008 presidential race (view site here). Produced by Linkfluence, this social graph theory based tool has both “map” and “trend” views. Each site is a node or “place” in the topology and anytime the sites reference each other or a candidate thru time a line or “edge” is drawn between the nodes.  I find it ironic that the “liberal” media is actually quite centrist when compared to the liberal and conservative sides of the topology. 

Where is the debate happening ? What are the hot topics on the agenda ? Who’s making the news ? Who are the online community leaders ? Here are very simple and comprehensive ways you can answer these questions. … Identify the true opinion hubs and shapers in the debate. (Presidential Watch 08).  

Here is the WashingtonPost.com view: 

blog links post.com

Here is a liberal view from DailyKos.com:

blog view daily kos

Here is a conservative view from MichelleMalkin.com

blog links michelle malkin

Biggest Drawing in the World (Erik Nordenankar)

Tuesday, May 27th, 2008

biggest GPS drawing

Reprinted from biggestdrawingintheworld.com. Thanks to Steph and Curt!

I think this is a hoax, but cool none-the-less…

With the help of a GPS device and DHL, [Erik Nordenankar] has drawn a self portrait on our planet. [His] pen was a briefcase containing the GPS device, being sent around the world. The paths the briefcase took around the globe became the strokes of the drawing.

The 17th of March 2008, [Erik] sent away a briefcase containing a GPS device with the express transportation company DHL. I gave them exact travel instructions, where to go, and in what order. 55 days later the briefcase returned to Stockholm. The GPS automatically recorded the briefcase’s journey around the world. The information was downloaded to [his] computer and gave [Erik his] drawing. Due to the GPS drawing technique and the magnitude of the drawing, the self portrait had to made in only one stroke. That giant stroke passed thru 6 continents and 62 countries, thus becoming 110,664 km long.


After the jump: photos of the GPS briefcase, the itinerary, DHL receipts, and several youtube videos.

Continue reading . . .