Posts Tagged ‘david alpert’

Washington’s Systemic Streets (GGDC, Track29)

Thursday, August 13th, 2009

[Editor's note: Since moving to Washington, DC, neigh on 7 years ago, I have been fascinated by the system of street names used in the nation's capital. There's your normal east-west, north-south grid sectioned into cardinal quadrants in the NW, NE, SW, and SE directions, and then all the state streets, often large Avenues, named after the 50 first-order administrative units that form these United States. The above map shows where these are (some are tiny!), and the entire post, from GreaterGreaterWashington and 29Tracks, has more maps and dialog including a tidbit about the 1st thru 3rd rings being based on number of syllables and the 4th ring based on plants. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from GreaterGreaterWashington and Track Twenty-Nine.
Aug 7, 2009. By Matt Johnson.

Visitors and residents of Washington, DC know, to one degree or another, about the city’s street naming conventions. Most tourists know that we have lettered and numbered streets. And to some degree, they know there is a system, but it doesn’t stop them asking us directions. But most out-of-towners and even many residents don’t understand the full ingenuity of the District’s naming system.

Washington is partially a planned city. The area north of the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers and south of Florida Avenue (originally Boundary Street) is known as the L’Enfant City. This area of Washington was the original city of Washington, laid out by Pierre L’Enfant and Andrew Ellicott. It is comprised of a rectilinear grid with a set of transverse diagonal avenues superimposed. Avenues frequently intersect in circles or squares, and the diagonals create many triangular or bow tie-shaped parks.

Washington is the seat of government of a nation. Believing that the structure of the government should inform the structure of the city, L’Enfant centered the nascent city on the Capitol, home of the Legislative (and at the time, the Judicial) branch of the government, the one the framers held in highest esteem. From this great building radiate the axes of Washington. North and South Capitol Streets form the north-south axis; East Capitol Street and the National Mall form the east-west axis. These axes divide the quadrants.

The axes also provide the basis for the naming and numbering systems. Lettered streets increase alphabetically as they increase in distance both north and south of the Mall and East Capitol Street. Numbered streets increase in number as they increase in distance both east and west of North and South Capitol Streets.

Continue reading at Greater Greater Washington . . .

California’s Proposed High-Speed Train System

Tuesday, May 27th, 2008

cal train logoThe official site of California’s proposed 800-mile high-speed train system has posted a Flash-based interactive map with videos visualizations and Trip Stats indicating the total distance between legs and how much the trip would take, cost, and how much greenhouse gas (CO2) would be saved (see screenshot below, interact with the Flash map here and the Google Maps version here).

Travel on the high-speed rail link would be significantly faster than by car from southern California to northern (3 hour trip at speeds up to 220 miles per hour) and reduce crowding in the states airports.

This November’s ballot will include a $9.9 billion bond for the initial construction phase ($40 billion total). Building out freeways and airport capacity would cost up to $82 billion. The rail system is expected to run at a profit and not require operating subsidies. It is also expected to jump-start smart urban growth around each of the new rail stations.

Thanks to David Alpert at GreaterGreaterWashington.org.

Continue reading at the Cal Rail site . . .

cal train map

Transit on Thursday

Thursday, May 1st, 2008

nytimes dc taxi picThe New York Time’s Ariel Sabar has an article on today’s switch-over to time-distance meters for Washington DC cabs: Adopting Meters, Washington Ends Taxi Zone System. The first few graphs:

Over the objections of cabdrivers, the District of Columbia is set on Thursday to scrap its seven-decade-old method of calculating taxi fares. Conventional time-and-distance meters will replace a system based on geographic zones.

The District was the only major American city to base fares on how many zones a cab crossed. Many riders, particularly out-of-town visitors, found the system of 23 zones confusing. Critics said it was too easy for unscrupulous drivers to overcharge.

‘The riding public asked for a more transparent fare system, and the mayor responded,’ Leon J. Swain Jr., chairman of the Taxicab Commission, said in a phone interview. Continue reading . . . 

Back up in New York the Times also covers a revision to the subway map made by Massimo Vignelli for the May edition of Men’s Vogue.

ny metro map comparions

Returning to DC, the WMATA subway and bus authority considered expanding our own system after the Feds breathed new steam into the planned Silver Line from Falls Church to Dulles International Airport and beyond to Loudoun County, the fastest growing country in the US recent years.

dc metro 2030 view