Posts Tagged ‘economy’

POTUS Tracker: Analyzing Obama’s Schedule (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, August 24th, 2009

[Editor's note: I'm proud to present POTUS Tracker: Analyzing Obama's schedule, a new tool from The Washington Post that keeps tabs on President Obama, whom he's meeting with (over 3,000 people so far), and what they're discussing (with 17 issue categories and 13 event type codes). It is the second in our Obama Accountability series. The first, Head Count: Tracking Obama's Appointments, has enjoyed a million visits since launch in April 2009. Data for this project available in RSS and JSON data dump.

I did the Flash interactive (using the Flare visualization package for the opening treemap isue view) and coordinated the project with Karen Yourish. Madonna Lebling and Ryan O'Neil are the genius behind the schedule information and online data presentation. POTUS Tracker was featured on CNN's State of the Nation (YouTube video) on Sunday, 23 August. With the project out of the way, I can turn my attention back to Natural Earth Vector.]

(Screenshot below) Interact with POTUS Tracker at The Washington Post . . .

potus_tracker_screenshot

CREDIT: Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, Madonna Lebling, Karen Yourish, Ryan O’Neil, Wilson Andrews, Jacqueline Kazil, Todd Lindeman, Lucy Shackelford, Paul Volpe

INTERACTIVE MAP: Impacted U.S. GM Plants (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive from Tuesday shows plants set to close under G.M.'s restructuring plan in the context of all of G.M.'s manufacturing facilities. Checkboxes allow different types of facilities to be filtered and zoom presets make it easier to zoom into clusters of markers. A reset button allows the display to return to it's original state. A table below the map contains some of the same information.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Under GM’s restructuring plan, the automakers’s manufacturing facilities will be reduced to 33 by 2012. Three distribution centers will also be eliminated.

Click on map icons for plant name, location, number of employees and more. Screenshot below.

Interact with original version at The Washington Post . . .

gm_plant_closures_map

Mapping Foreclosures in the New York Region (NY Times)

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

[Editor's note: The interactive Google Maps mashup in Flash AS3 from the New  York times shows vector overlay of choropleth mapping by census tract and at the street level via dot distribution. As the user zooms in, the dots are revealed, as is a street map. At all levels the census tract summary statistics are available with a mouse over. Zooms are preset for some areas, and the user can type in their own address to zoom to that area. Multiple years add time dimension. Spatial brushing on the map is accomplished by outlining the geography's stroke, not changing the fill color. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the New York Times. May 15, 2009

A New York Times analysis found that foreclosure rates in the region were highest in areas with high minority populations. Zoom in to see foreclosures at the street level. Screenshot below.

Interact with the original at New York Times . . .

nytimes_foreclosures_map_3

nytimes_foreclosures_map_2

nytimes_foreclosures_map_1

Flow Mapping (Box Shaped World)

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

uk-interdependenceminard

[Editor's note: Flow maps have always ranked high on my radar but constructing them has always been tedious. This post and academic paper link detail how they can be automated with programatically, including edge routing (not directly from A to B, but with bends to not overlap other connections).]

Republished from Box Shaped World.

Getting a head start on a new project that is more cartographic. It will involve mapping migration/flows from Australia to the Northern Territory (probably smaller geographic units than states). I like making maps, and so I’m excited to do some cartography beyond standard ArcGIS layouts. There are different possibilities on how to map this. Initially, I think I will use something like this that creates a more trunk/branch flow map instead of the typical straight line between places (Tobler’s Flowmapper). The project lead doesn’t like this style too much, but thought the trunk/branch style might work. We might pursue other mapping techniques, which would be cool to try and apply different map techniques to this area…

Continue reading at Box Shaped World . . .

Republished from Stanford Graphics paper.

Cartographers have long used flow maps to show the movement of objects from one location to another, such as the number of people in a migration, the amount of goods being traded, or the number of packets in a network. The advantage of flow maps is that they reduce visual clutter by merging edges. Most flow maps are drawn by hand and there are few computer algorithms available. We present a method for generating flow maps using hierarchical clustering given a set of nodes, positions, and flow data between the nodes. Our techniques are inspired by graph layout algorithms that minimize edge crossings and distort node positions while maintaining their relative position to one another. We demonstrate our technique by producing flow maps for network traffic, census data, and trade data.

Continue reading past abstract, includes source code . . .

A Visual Guide to the Federal Reserve (Mint)

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

[Editor's note: Fun visual narrative guide to the Federal Reserve system and it's roll in the U.S. economy.]

Republished from Mint.com and WallStats.com.

The Federal Reserve steers the American economy and yet it remains a system that is shrouded in mystery. Few understand the logic behind its policy decisions, decisions that have a profound effect on the US economy. And over the years it has operated seemingly independently of the more democratically elected arms of the US government. Its public stance, generally lacking in transparency has fueled conspiracy theories. Some even suggest its formation lead directly to the Great Depression.

So just what is the Federal Reserve? Why was it formed in the first place? And how does its monetary policy affect the lives of everyday US citizens? Here we do our part to demystify the Federal Reserve.

visualguidetothefederalreserve

What’s the state of the economy? (Russell Investments)

Friday, May 22nd, 2009

[Editor's note: Very nice Flashed-based interactive showing 7 indicators, their extreme historic ranges, typical ranges, and current value/rate and trend. Thanks Sarah!]

Republished from Russell Investments.

To help you talk to your clients, we’ve identified a few key economic and market indicators to help assess the current economic health and trend.

Interact with the original at Russel Investments . . .

stateofeconomyrussel

Banks Need at Least $65 Billion in Capital (Wall Street Journal)

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive from the Wall Street Journal delves into the top 19 banks in the US and the Treasury Department's recent "stress test". The user can analyze across 5 different metrics for the same company in one view. Thanks Christina!]

Republished from the Wall Street Journal.
Related article: Banks Need at Least $65 Billion in Capital
MAY 7, 2009

Stress: Comparing the 19 Banks That Were Tested

Details so far on the government’s analysis of financial health. Click on a bank to compare it to others.

View the interactive version at the Wall Street Journal . . .

wsj_bankstresstest

Produced by Andrew Garcia Phillips and Stephen Grocer, The Wall Street Journal.

Jump Starting the Global Economy (Wash Post)

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009

globaleconver_040209

[Editor's note: Find the trends, group them together, and use that hierarchy (topology) as an access metaphor. And remember geography doesn't always need to mean map.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
Original publication date: March 29th, 2009.
By Karen Yourish And Todd Lindeman — The Washington Post.

The total amount of the stimulus packages approved by the G-20 countries amounts to $1.6 trillion. More than half of that comes from the United States.

Other maps and graphics that use grouping:

Why Is Her Paycheck Smaller? (NY Times)

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive from the New York Times details the wage gab between male and female workers in different economic sectors. It starts out with an overview by occupation for 2008 and shows that while the gap has closed over time, it still exists. Users can see the specific gap by job by mousing over the data points. Occupation categories can be narrowed and include some limited narrative story telling annotating and explaining wage gaps for select professions. It would be nice to see this graphic in two views: absolute gap and normalized by experience (just as some maps are normalized by per capita), one of the identified factors the gap is now attributed to.]

Republished from The New York Times.
March 1, 2009. By Hannah Fairfield and Graham Roberts.

View the interactive version at NYTimes.
Screenshots below.

Nearly every occupation has the gap — the seemingly unbridgeable chasm between the size of the paycheck brought home by a woman and the larger one earned by a man doing the same job. Economists cite a few reasons: discrimination as well as personal choices within occupations are two major factors, and part of the gap can be attributed to men having more years of experience and logging more hours.

(below) Initial screen showing all categories.  Note mouseOver showing details for data point.

(below) Showing just Entertainment, education, and law jobs. Note callout for professors.

(below) Showing management, business and financial jobs. Note callout for chief executives.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Census Bureau

Interactive Map: The Shaping of America (Atlantic Mag)

Friday, March 6th, 2009

[Editor's note: Interactive Google Maps mashup based in Flex (Flash) animating maps of 3 themes showing the US cities and how they stand to benefit or loose from the current economic crises. From the Atlantic, "Urban theorist Richard Florida explains how the current meltdown will forever change our geography." Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the Atlantic magazine.
Text by Richard Florida. Interactive by Charlie Szymanski.
March 2009 edition.

“No place in the United States is likely to escape a long and deep recession. Nonetheless, as the crisis continues to spread outward from New York, through industrial centers like Detroit, and into the Sun Belt, it will undoubtedly settle much more heavily on some places than on others. Some cities and regions will eventually spring back stronger than before. Others may never come back at all. As the crisis deepens, it will permanently and profoundly alter the country’s economic landscape. I believe it marks the end of a chapter in American economic history, and indeed, the end of a whole way of life.”

Continue reading full article at The Atlantic magazine . . .

View original interactive version. Two more views from the interactive.