Posts Tagged ‘Election’

TimeSpace: Election map-based news viewer (The Washington Post)

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

[Editor's note: I made it back from China just in time to vote this morning at my neighborhood polling place. Coming home to the USA, I am reminded how lucky I am to live in a free, election-driven democracy. Use it or loose it. Please vote today!]

Explore the election with this new tool from The Washington Post.

Interact with original here at washingtonpost.com.

TimeSpace Beta is a map and timeline that allows users to navigate through hundreds of photos, video, articles, tweets, posts and audio related to the national election from around the country. Use the timeline to find out exactly what, when and where a story took place. Click the ? icon in the upper right for help.

Some item locations are approximate. | Sources: AP, Reuters, Newsweek, Twitter, and The Washington Post | TimeSpace Beta verson 0.3 | Feedback and known bugs/issues | Credits: Dan Berko, Chris Buddie, Jesse Foltz and Steven King

Campaign Donors: FundRace 2008 (Huffington Post)

Monday, October 27th, 2008

[Editor’s note: This mashup from Eyebeam and the Huffington Post maps campaign contributions for the 2008 presidential race down to the house level. Find out who your neighbors are giving $ to! All descriptions below from the Huffington Post site. There is a time lag between when a contribution is made, reported, and published on this site.]


View interactive version at Huffington Post.com . . .

Welcome to FundRace 2008.

Want to know if a celebrity is playing both sides of the fence? Whether that new guy you’re seeing is actually a Republican or just dresses like one? If your boss maxed out at that fundraiser or got comped? Whether your neighbor’s political involvement stops at that hideous lawn sign?

FundRace makes it easy to search by name or address to see which presidential candidates your friends, family, co-workers, and neighbors are contributing to. Or you can see if your favorite celebrity is putting their money where their mouth is.

FundRace gives you the technology to do what politicians and journalists have been doing for years: find out where the money’s coming from, see who it’s going to, and solve the mystery of why that crazy ex-roommate of yours is now the Ambassador to Turks and Caicos.

The Ad Wars (NY Times)

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008

[Editor's note: Graduated circles are automatically sized in Flash interactive from The New York Times. I believe the circle locations are auto plotted, too, but already transformed to projected XY coordinates, not from Lat-Longs. I like the National and Cable graduated symbols in the Gulf of Mexico.]

About $300 million has been spent from April 3 to Oct. 13, 2008 to broadcast over 200 ads, according to statistics compiled by Campaign Media Analysis Group, which tracks political advertising expenditures.

View original interactive version at NYTimes.com . . .

Source: Campaign Media Analysis Group, a division of TNS Media Intelligence

The Words They Used (NY Times)

Monday, September 29th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Continuing my blogging catch-up, this graphic from the NY Times on Sept. 4th integrates graduated circles with tag clouds (word clouds) that also include frequency numbers. This approach takes up more space, but I think makes it more readable. Below the main “cloud” is a breakdown by speaker with columns with tags and another set of mini graduated circles in rows. Important to note: this is rate per 25,000 words spoken, not the actual frequencies.

Seeing this graphic again and thinking of the first Presidential debate between Obama and McCain last week, I am reminded that these tag clouds are only appropriate when the content sample is large / long enough to allow themes to manifest and that categories can be just as appropriate as individual key words.]

The words that speakers used at the two political conventions show the themes that the parties have highlighted. Republican speakers have talked about reform and character far more frequently than the Democrats. And Republicans were more likely to talk about businesses and taxes, while Democrats were more likely to mention jobs or the economy.

View original at full size at nytimes.com . . .

Graphic by MATTHEW ERICSON/The New York Times.

And Now, a Word on the Convention Sponsors (Kelso)

Wednesday, August 27th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Below is the interactive I just published in the Washington Post examining the sponsors of this week’s Democratic and next week’s Republican conventions. Does money influence politics? Use this tool to explore further. Features thematic map with proportional circles showing number of contributions and dollar value of contributions by state and a data table listing of those companies and if they tend to give more to Democrats or Republicans. Reads data in from XML file and programatically draws the proportional circles. Republished from the Washington Post.]

Corporations, unions and wealthy donors are allowed to pour unlimited cash into the host committees that finance presidential conventions in exchange for goodies such as private receptions with legislators and VIP access to special events. Most of the corporate sponsors revealed so far for Denver and St. Paul (the host committees do not have to disclose donors or how much they raise until 60 days after the convention) are veterans of Washington’s money-for-influence game.

Use the interactive below to see how they have contributed more than $180 million to federal campaigns since 2005.

SOURCES: Campaign Finance Institute, Center for Responsive Politics

CREDIT: Interactive by Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso and Karen Yourish – The Washington Post. – August 27, 2008

Potential Sites for Slots in Maryland (Kelso)

Wednesday, August 27th, 2008

[Editor’s note: I published a series of interactive Google mashups last month in The Washington Post showing where in Maryland the proposed slots machine sites would be located if a November ballot initiative passes. The maps also feature a poll and comment section on each site. Here’s the mashup for Anne Arundel County (view original, hacked version below). The opening page for the series is here.]

GRAPHIC: By Laura Cochran, washingtonpost.com, and Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, The Washington Post

Who Are You Calling Old? (WSJ)

Tuesday, August 26th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Fabulous charting of notable past presidents and their age entering office, age at death, and time in office. Includes Teddy Roosevelt, Kennedy, Clinton, Buchanan, Harrison, Reagan, and potential Obama and McCain. Reprinted from the Wall Street Journal. View full resolution version.]

 

Labels Change as Americans Live Longer, But Age Still Plays a Role in Election

By JUNE KRONHOLZ
August 26, 2008; Page A15

In 1996, Bob Dole, the Republican Party’s presidential nominee, battled criticism that, at 73 years old, he was too old to be president. Now 85, Mr. Dole is working “pretty much every day” at a Washington law firm, says the firm’s spokesman.

Age is certain to be an issue in this election, too. Republican Sen. John McCain, who turns 72 this week, would be the oldest man elected president should he win. Democratic Sen. Barack Obama, at 47, would be the fourth-youngest.

But in a country that is rapidly aging while staying healthy longer, what does old age mean, and how much should it matter?

The average U.S. life expectancy is now age 78, up 30 years since 1900 and up 10 years since 1950, according to the Census Bureau. Geriatricians now talk of those younger than 80 as the “young old,” and of those younger than 65 as the “near old.

U.S. businesses still seem wary of older people. The Corporate Library, a business-research firm, says that seven of the largest 500 public companies, including News Corp. — owner of Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal — have chief executives who are 72 or older. Some corporate recruiters warn about the memories, energy levels and technological savvy of older executives.

By that standard, businessman Warren Buffet, one-quarter of U.S. senators and four Supreme Court justices are over the over-72 hill.

In corporate America, “there’s a code word — how much ‘runway’ does a guy have” left in his career, said Hal Reiter, chairman of Herbert Mines Associates, which recruits executives for the retail industry. An executive in his 60s probably has five to seven years left on his runway, Mr. Reiter said.

Some who study aging say such fears are misplaced. A 45-year-old and a 75-year-old “absolutely” have the same mental capacity, and energy is a function of health rather than aging, said Neil Resnick, chief of geriatric medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.

“Aging has such a small impact on how we function that it is of minimal importance” compared with experience, personality and the advisers a president or chief executive surrounds himself with, Dr. Resnick added.

Geriatricians say most people begin losing organ function — which means they start aging — somewhere between 18 and 30. After that, the heart, kidneys and other organs lose about 1% of their function each year. The world record for a 75-year-old marathon runner is about 50% longer than the world record for a runner who is 50 years younger.

But organs have from four to six times more capacity than most people need. That excess capacity is why we can run marathons or endure other extraordinary mental or physical challenges.

Brain function declines at the same rate as other organs, and especially affects how fast older people can retrieve information — the explanation for that maddening “senior moment.”

Our genes influence how much and how fast we decline: They account for about 30% of longevity and perhaps half of age-related changes in the brain, said John Rowe, a physician and former Aetna Inc. chairman who now heads a MacArthur Foundation research program on aging.

But life experience and accumulated wisdom can help offset normal brain decline and compensate for slowed retrieval time. “The great benefit of aging is ‘been there, done that and learned from it,’ ” said David Reuben, head of geriatric medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles. Mathematicians do their best work in their 20s; orchestra conductors and diplomats peak in their 60s or 70s, he added.

Continue reading at Wall Street Journal . . .

Pick Your President contest (Wash Post)

Wednesday, August 20th, 2008

[Editor's note: The Washington Post rolled out a new contest this week in preparation for the Democrat and Republican conventions and the big event come November 3rd. It uses a Flash based map of the 50 states to let the user choose which candidate McCain, Obama, or Other/undecided the state will vote for and how the votes will tally in the, as I interject, outmoded electoral college. Once set, the user can submit the map and prizes will be allocated after the election.]

Republished from the Washington Post:

Create your political map and predict the electoral outcome! Think you know politics? Here’s your chance to prove it. Pick which candidate will get to 270 electoral votes and you could win the most competitive contest outside the presidential race. Full Contest Rules and Prizes.

Enter the contest. Sample map below.

Geography Histogram of Election Topics (NY Times)

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008

The New York Times featured this delectable toy (tool) on their home page for a few hours on Tuesday. The compact Flash interactive shows a dynamic histogram stacking the average opinion of voters on Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton per state on a series of election focused topics. The states are represented with little squares that stack into histogram bars.

If a state falls somewhere between 20 and 29% then it it will stack in the “20s” column with other states that fall in that column. The election topics are accessed by a listing below the histogram or the user can flip thru them with next and previous buttons.

The horizontal and then vertical easing of the state histogram boxes on change of topic is a beautiful dance. Props to Shan Carter and Amanda Cox. Thanks Christina!

Finally, The Democrats Have a Candidate

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008

The New York Times celebrates with this graphic showing Barack Obama’s continued surge in super delegates compared to Hillary Clinton thru the last primarys tonight. Props to Farhana Hossain and Archie Tse.

On Day of Last Primary, Obama’s Superdelegate Surge

Database of all superdelegates and their candidate preferences.

ny times final super delegate count