Posts Tagged ‘google’

Google Maps Elevation Web Services (Google)

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

screen-shot-2010-03-24-at-104824-pm

[Editor’s note: A free, sans-API key solution from the web mapping giant for showing elevation (point or along custom path) for Google Maps Mashups either in the v3 API directly or separately as a stand-alone web service. And it returns JSON :) Thanks @lagerratrobe!]

Republished from Google.

The Google Elevation web service provides you a simple interface to query locations on the earth for elevation data. Additionally, you may request sampled elevation data along paths, allowing you to calculate elevation changes along routes.

The Elevation service provides elevation data for all locations on the surface of the earth, including depth locations on the ocean floor (which return negative values). In those cases where Google does not possess exact elevation measurements at the precise location you request, the service will interpolate and return an averaged value using the four nearest locations.

With the Elevation service, you can develop hiking and biking applications, mobile positioning applications, or low resolution surveying applications.

Check the documentation out over at Google . . .

Google Public Data Explorer (information aesthetics)

Monday, March 15th, 2010

google_data_explorer

[Editor's note: Summary of data visualization web apps with focus on the new Google Public Data Explorer which has a good mix of charting and mapping. Interesting Google has approached the visualization space with their Flash API. Some offer private data but most take a shared-data (public) storage system.]

Republished from Information Aesthetics.

Google Public Data Explorer [google.com] is yet the latest entry in the ongoing race to democratize data access and its representation for lay people. Similar to Many Eyes, Swivel, Tableau Public and many others, Google Public aims to make large datasets easy to explore, visualize and communicate. As a unique feature, the charts and maps are able to animate over time, so that any meaningful time-varying data changes become easier to understand. The goal is for students, journalists, policy makers and everyone else to play with the tool to create visualizations of public data, link to them, or embed them in their own webpages. Embedded charts are also updated automatically, so they always show the latest available data.

Continue reading at Information Aesthetics . . .

Meet Map Practical, a new carto blog

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

Kevin McManigal (also of Adventure Cycling) is teaching intro to cartography in Montana and has a new blog focused on getting into mapping. First posts focus on Google My Maps, Vector versus Raster, and Purpose and Audience.

Welcome to Map Practical, where the cartography gets done. These are the cartographic trenches, the domain of greasy hands, busted knuckles, and sore mouse fingers. This is the home of techniques, tutorials, and tricks of all things map. Here’s how we do it; your job is to make it look good!

Are you a cartographer or studying to be one? How many tricks have you found that slipped your memory and had to be re-learned? How many hours have you spent on Google looking for that long lost tutorial? Thinking back on my first mapping class, there were so many things that I figured out by trial and error, blindly groping for the right keywords in “Help.” There has to be a better way!

So, here I am teaching cartography now and thought, “What if all those tips could be in one convenient place?” Well here it is, Map Practical! This will be an ongoing process; a tip a week, a link here, a comment there, and a video tutorial when I find the time. After a semester or two it should be a good resource.

Please contribute, and it will only get better.

Thanks, Kevin

Check out Map Practical . . .

Google Massively Automates Tropical Deforestation Detection (HughStimson.org)

Friday, December 18th, 2009

[Editor's note: Perhaps Wired magazine's Google evil-meter just tipped a bit less negative? In all seriousness, this sounds like a great project!]

Republished from HughStimson.org. Dec. 11, 2009.

Land cover change analysis has been an active area of research in the remote sensing community for many years. The idea is to make computational protocols and algorithms that take a couple of digital images collected by satellites or airplanes, turn them into land­cover maps, layer them on top of each other, and pick out the places where the land cover type has changed. The best protocols are the most precise, the fastest, and which can chew on multiple images recorded under different conditions. One of the favorite applications of land cover change analysis has been deforestation detection. A particularly popular target for deforestation analysis is the tropical rain forests, which are being chain sawed down at rates which are almost as difficult to comprehend as it is to judge exactly how bad the effects of their removal will be on biological diversity, planetary ecosystem functioning and climate stability.

Google has now gotten itself into the environmental remote sensing game, but in a Google-esque way: massively, ubiquitously, computationally intensively, plausibly benignly, and with probable long-term financial benefits. They are now running a program to vacuum up satellite imagery and apply land cover change detection optomized for spotting deforestation, and for the time being targeted at the Amazon basin. The public doesn’t currently get access to the results, but presumably that access will be rolled out once Google et al are confident in the system. I have to hand it to Google: they are technically careful, but politically aggressive. Amazon deforestation is (or should still be) a very political topic.

Continue reading at HughStimson.org . . .

Affordable Housing Mashup (Envisioning Development)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

wholiveshere

[Editor's note: Google mashup with fun charting trying to make sense out of simple yet complicated subject.]

Republished from EnvisioningDevelopment.net.

“Affordable Housing.” The phrase seems plain enough, but it doesn’t always mean what people think it does! It actually has a technical government definition that can determine what gets built and who lives there. Use these tools to answer the all-important question: “Affordable to whom?

What Is Affordable Housing? from the Center for Urban Pedagogy on Vimeo.

A stop-action animation on the technical definitions of affordable housing — by Rosten Woo and John Mangin of CUP, animator/designer Jeff Lai, and Glen Cummings of MTWTF. Narrated by Lisa Burriss. Sound by Rosten Woo.

Google details Maps Navigation for Android, iPhone (Electronista)

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

[Editor's note: As this YouTube video shows, Google's self-branded map navigation app for their Android series of phones includes some first-for-free features like natural voice search, turn-by-turn using a street view overlay, and instant rerouting. First for the 'droids, next for the iPhones.]

Republished from electronista.

Google today provided added details of the turn-by-turn mapping service found on the Motorola Droid. Google Maps Navigation adds many of the features that would normally exist in a dedicated GPS unit, such as a bird’s-eye view and spoken directions, but takes advantage of Google’s existing Maps features. Traffic is free in those areas where Google provides service, and Street View can show directions overlaid on top of in-location photos.

Search is naturally rolled into Navigation and lets drivers use voice or typed commands to navigate to a location by search criteria rather than a specific address. Long-distance travelers can launch a search in mid-drive and find just the points of interest close to the already planned route.

Google Maps Navigation ships first on the Droid as a beta but will be available for all Android 2.0 devices. The company also says it’s cooperating with Apple to bring the feature to the iPhone through its built-in Maps tool but hasn’t given a timetable for when it expects the feature to be ready.

The unveiling is a potential coup for Google. Although RIM’s BlackBerry line and most GPS-aware Nokia phones include company-made turn-by-turn apps, these either have limited functionality or require a paid subscription to work properly. Google Maps requires an active Internet connection to download map data but is otherwise free to use where most stand-alone apps, including for the iPhone, often carry a significant initial fee and often charge extra for future map updates.

Thanks for ur Clicks, Goodbye Google Adsense

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

The top display ad on Kelso’s Corner is history. After 8 months I’ve finally made the minimum $100 to cash out of Google’s AdSense Ponzi scheme. They can keep the odd change. Thanks everyone!

Mountains Out of Molehills (Info is Beautiful)

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

[Editor's note: Captioned "a timeline of global media scares" this illustration from Information is Beautiful charts Y2K, SARS, and Swine Flu using the Google News Timeline resource.]

Republished from Information is Beautiful.

mountains_molehills

If You Click on the Google Ad More, I’ll Remove It Quicker

Monday, September 14th, 2009

If the last couple months of advertising via Google AdSense and Amazon Affiliates has taught me anything, it’s that I made $0 with Amazon and around $20 / month with Google (on around 25,000 page views each month). Not exactly stellar. Especially considering Google doesn’t pay out till your account reaches $100. Interesting to think that Google might actually be making it’s billions by an accounting trick or two where they get to earn interest on my account credit balance for months (potentially years for some). Multiple by a couple million websites and it’s no wonder they are making out like bandits. The real money in the ad-supported business model seems revolve around actual high-value ad placement which usually requires an ad account rep. Something I’m not about to spring for, nor do I have extra time to act as. So help me remove the stupid banner ads by clicking on them (just once per reader, please). When my Google account reads $100, I’ll cash it out and remove the top image ad. Or you could buy me a beer via the “Donate” button ;)

MarkerClusterer in an All New Flavor – ActionScript! (GoogleGeoDev)

Friday, August 14th, 2009

[Editor’s note: An AS3 Flash / Flex library for auto-clustering near map location markers into groups symbols. This speeds map rendering and groups points all within the same neighborhood, avoiding “red dot fever” marker overload. An AS3 implementation of existing JavaScript extension. Still needs to account for geographic region clustering (not just within a grid). Thanks Laris!]

Republished from Google Geo Developer Blog.
Monday, July 27, 200. 

My name is XIAO Juguang – just call me Juguang. I am a freelance software developer based in Beijing, China. Technically speaking, I’m double sided. On one side, I specialize in knowledge management and business modeling, traditionally using LAMP and now experimenting with offerings like Google App Engine. On the other side, I love visualization in time and space, with charts, trees, graphs, and maps, always using the power of ActionScript/Flex, with the help of open-source projects like Degrafa, Axiis, and Birdeye, and of course, APIs like the Google Maps API for Flash.

A few month ago, Xiaoxi Wu (also from China!) created the MarkerClusterer library for the Google Maps JavaScript API v2 and released it in their open source utility library. This library did automatic clustering of markers placed on a map, so that a large amount of markers wouldn’t overcrowd the map or overwhelm the user. This is a great technique for having a better performing map (see this talk for more tips on improving map performance), and the Flash map community immediately rushed to port the code to ActionScript. Developer Sean Toru posted the first port, a version that was only Flash-compatible, Ian Watkins modified that port to use Flex packages, and then I refactored the code to be more ActionScript-friendly and released it into the open-source library. It’s great when random strangers can collaborate together on a common code goal. :)

To see how the AS3 MarkerClusterer works, try out the demo (shown above). As you zoom and pan the map, you can witness how the markers are clustered and re-clustered. To learn how to use MarkerClusterer on your own map, view the source code of the demo. To use the library, check out the source code and import it into your project.

The current algorithm is quite simple, just clustering markers in a grid and using static images for the cluster markers. Future extensions could include support for regional clustering or using arbitrary DisplayObjects for the cluster markers. If you’re interested in extending the library, join the project.