Posts Tagged ‘infographics’

27+ Beautiful Examples of Infographics (dzineblog)

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

[Editor’s note: I especially like a couple after the jump, Where are all the fish? and Bulgarian Labour Force. Check em out! Thanks Matheau!]

Republished from DzineBlog.

Infographics refers to visual representations of information, data or knowledge. These graphics are used where complex information needs to be explained quickly and clearly, such as in signs, maps, journalism, technical writing, and education. They are also used extensively as tools by computer scientists, mathematicians, and statisticians to ease the process of developing and communicating conceptual information.

Infographics allows you to see the and understand the concept in a more interesting and useful manner, Here I’ve listed 27+ beautiful infographic design, that will help and inspire you to design a complex data in to a simple attractive design.

1.) The Largest Bankruptcies in History

2.) Housing & Poverty

3.) Crisis Of Credit 1

4.) Crisis Of Credit 2

5.) The Great Pacific Garbage

Continue reading at DzineBlog . . .

Visual Language and Data Analysis (Visual Business Intelligence)

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

head-first-data-analysis visual-language-for-designers

[Editor’s note: Two new books, one from Connie Malamed titled “Visual Language for Designers: Principles for Creating Graphics that People Understand” and the other called “Head First Data Analysis” by Michael Milton are endorsed by Stephen Few on his Visual Business Intelligence blog. Check em out.]

Republished from Stephen Few ‘s Visual Business Intelligence blog.

If you’ve been reading this blog regularly for awhile, you know that I occasionally bemoan the sad state of most information graphics (infographics). Most of the folks who produce infographics lack guidelines based on solid research. In their attempt to inform, describe, or instruct, most of the infographics that I’ve seen fail-many miserably. I’m thrilled to announce, however, that a new book is now available that takes a great step toward providing the guidelines that are needed for the production of effective infographics.

Continue reading about Visual Language or Data Analysis at Visual Business Intelligence . . .

Looking for Legal Graphics for Exhibit at Michigan State (Infographics Alumni)

Friday, August 28th, 2009

Karl Gude is putting together a gallery exhibit of graphics on any sort of legal topic (especially graphics created by law firms for evidence presentation) for his Michigan State University College of Law. Besides the analog show, he’ll post the final selections and those that didn’t make the cut on a Flickr page. Due this coming Wednesday, 2 September 2009. Send them to nathaniel@kelsocartography.com and I’ll forward on to Karl.

Understanding Infographics (Chrys Wu)

Thursday, March 19th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Chrys Wu takes care of Web 2.0 type aggregation and promotion at The Washington Post. She has a blog and recent posts have focused on Infographics. I highlight several below. Nutgraph: Don’t think about one platform first. Think about all platforms available simultaneously. Also: “Infographics is not art, it is a conveyance of information.”]

Understanding Infographics, First Pass

As promised in a previous post on learning information graphics (sometimes shortened to “infographics”), I’m posting my raw notes from Day 1 of an information graphics workshop taught last month by Alberto Cairo and Xaquin G.V., two leading practitioners.

Alberto Cairo teaches an infographics seminar by Medialab Prado on FlickrAbove, Alberto Cairo teaches a data visualization seminar at Medialab-Prado in Madrid in 2007.

Read full notes from class . . .

Some of Chrys’ favorite information graphics and visualization blogs:

Alberto Cairo Has a Monster Reading List

Day One of the Beyond Bootcamp information graphics workshop taught by Alberto Cairo and Xaquin G.V. has been much less scary than I’d first thought.

Cairo’s lecture has been a model of organized thought and progressive structure, which should come as no surprise to anyone, given the nature of his work.

What’s also obvious is that the man reads a heck of a lot. For every concept and example, he’s tossed off a different book title.

Here’s what he’s recommended to us so far, in no particular order: