Posts Tagged ‘Interactive’

Nolli map of Rome, Interactive version of 1748 masterpiece

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

screen-shot-2010-07-05-at-44744-pm

[Editor's: I was reminded of Nolli's work by Michal Migurski this weekend. Fresh off the heals of his award winning interactive version of the 2001 Atlas of Oregon, Erik Steiner presents the original Nolli map in a Flash-based interface to toggle annotation layers and zoom into the engraving. Extensive scholarly background is also provided on the site. Eric is now the lab director of the Spatial History Lab at Stanford University.]

Republished from University of Oregon.

The 1748 Map of Rome, by Giambattista Nolli is widely regarded by scholars as one of the most important historical documents of the city ever created and serves to geo-reference a vast body of information to better understand the Eternal City and its key role in shaping Western Civilization. The Nolli Map Web Site introduces students to Rome and the structure of its urban form; it illustrates the evolution of the city over time; and it reveals diverse factors that determined its development.

Giambattista Nolli (1701-1756) was an architect and surveyor who lived in Rome and devoted his life to documenting the architectural and urban foundations of the city. The fruit of his labor, La Pianta Grande di Roma (“the great plan of Rome”) is one of the most revealing and artistically designed urban plans of all time. The Nolli map is an ichnographic plan map of the city, as opposed to a bird’s eye perspective, which was the dominant cartographic representation style prevalent before his work. Not only was Nolli one of the first people to construct an ichnographic map of Rome, his unique perspective has been copied ever since.

The map depicts the city in astonishing detail. Nolli accomplished this by using scientific surveying techniques, careful base drawings, and minutely prepared engravings. The map’s graphic representations include a precise architectural scale, as well as a prominent compass rose, which notes both magnetic and astronomical north. The Nolli map is the first accurate map of Rome since antiquity and captures the city at the height of its cultural and artistic achievements. The historic center of Rome has changed little over the last 250 years; therefore, the Nolli map remains one of the best sources for understanding the contemporary city.

The intention of this website is to reveal both the historical significance of the map and the principles of urban form that may influence city design in the future. During the last half of the 20th century, architects and urban designers have shown a renewed interest in what the Nolli map has to offer, leading to new urban theories and a model for the study of all cities.

Interact with the map at UofO . . .

On the Map: Five Major North Korean Prison Camps (Wash Post)

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive map from The Washington Post examines political prison camps were opponents or fallen favorites of the regime in Pyongyang are forced to do slave labour. Great use of Google Earth to generate the 3d scene, combined with Natural Scene Designer. Kudos to Kat and Laris for a great presentation.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

North Korea has operated political prison camps for more than 50 years, twice as long as the Gulag in the former Soviet Union. People suspected of opposing the government are forced to do slave labor in the camps, which hold an estimated 200,000 prisoners. Great use of Google Earth to generate the 3d scene, combined with Natural Scene Designer. North Korea’s government says the camps don’t exist, but high-resolution satellite images show otherwise.

Interact with the original at Washington Post . . .

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Using Data Visualization as a Reporting Tool Can Reveal Story’s Shape (Poynter)

Friday, June 26th, 2009

[Editor's note: My colleague Sarah Cohen at The Washington Post was recently interviewed by Poynter about creating data visualizations to help readers understand and reporters research complicated stories. Sarah is on her way to a big new gig at Duke University.]

Republished from Poynter.
By Steve Myers at 6:12 AM on Apr. 14, 2009

Readers have come to rely on interactive presentations to understand complicated stories, using them to zoom in on periods of time and highlight areas of interest. Yet to investigate these stories, reporters often create what amounts to handcrafted investigative art: flow charts with circles and arrows, maps shaded with highlighters and stuck with pins.

More and more, though, some reporters are using data visualization tools to find the story hidden in the data. Those tools help them discover patterns and focus their reporting on particular places and times. Many of the presentations, which can have rough interfaces or less-than-sleek design, are never published.

At the recent National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting (NICAR) conference, Sarah Cohen, database editor for The Washington Post‘s investigative team — and recently named professor of computational journalism at Duke University — showed how reporters can use interactive graphics for their exploratory reporting. [PDF]

Cohen described this approach to me via e-mail. Here’s an edited version of our exchange.

Steve Myers: How would creating a digital, visual representation of data help a reporter? What does it tell you that you wouldn’t be able to find otherwise?

Sarah Cohen
Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen: The same way that visualizations and graphics help readers cut through a lot of clutter and display dense information in an efficient way. The most common things that early visualizations help with are place and time — two of the most important elements in reporting a complex story. Those two things are really hard to see in text. They’re really, really hard to see in combination. So the graphics can show you where to go to find your subjects or where to go to find the most typical subjects. They can also show you when the story you are trying to find peaked. Put them together, and you can start finding the very best examples for your story.

That’s pretty general, so let me give you a couple of examples. During a story on disaster payments in the farm subsidy system, we wanted to make sure that we went to places that had received the payments year after year after year. Using a database, we could find farms that had received multiple payments pretty easily. But looking at repeated images of density maps that I made of the payments, it was really obvious where to go — specific areas of North Dakota and Kansas.

Crop payments
Sarah Cohen/Poynter illustration
Cohen used density maps to figure out what areas of the country had received disaster payments year after year.


In another example, we were working last year on a story on practices used by landlords to empty their buildings, partly in order to avoid strict laws on condo conversions (visualizations: research version, published version. We knew one neighborhood of the city was Ground Zero — an area called Columbia Heights, in Northwest D.C. But making an interactive map with a slider that showed the timing, we could see that it was moving into other areas of the city, especially in Southeast. We could also quickly see that the most affluent areas of the city had none of them.

Continue reading at Poynter . . .

INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC: The Post 200 Database (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, May 13th, 2009

gr2009051202461

[Editor's note: Uses the Flare visualization API in Flash ActionScript 3 to display data about the Post 200 companies in a treemap format. A vexing and il-documented API, but powerful. We considered showing the data with a graduated circle map but the company locations were too clustered for that to be effective.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
13 May 2009. By Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso and Terri Rupar – The Washington Post

Use our interactive graphic to explore data — including revenue and employment — for the top companies in the Washington area.

Boxes represent individual companies grouped together by sector, size based on data.

View the interactive version at The Washington Post . . .

post200interactive

Banks Need at Least $65 Billion in Capital (Wall Street Journal)

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive from the Wall Street Journal delves into the top 19 banks in the US and the Treasury Department's recent "stress test". The user can analyze across 5 different metrics for the same company in one view. Thanks Christina!]

Republished from the Wall Street Journal.
Related article: Banks Need at Least $65 Billion in Capital
MAY 7, 2009

Stress: Comparing the 19 Banks That Were Tested

Details so far on the government’s analysis of financial health. Click on a bank to compare it to others.

View the interactive version at the Wall Street Journal . . .

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Produced by Andrew Garcia Phillips and Stephen Grocer, The Wall Street Journal.

ESRI’s ArcGIS Server Provides Foundation for Maryland’s MD iMap (ESRI)

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

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[Editor's note: One of the more useful + powerful sites to leverage new Flash / Flex mashup capabilities of new ArcGIS 9.3 release. The site is designed both for state residents and government policy makers. Thanks Mary Kate!]

Republished from ESRI and State of Maryland. Original Feb. 11, 2009.

Authoritative Statewide Basemap and Performance Measurement Tool Serves Government and Citizens

Redlands, California—Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley recently launched the ArcGIS Server software-based MD iMap, an authoritative online basemap of Maryland that allows government and citizens to assess state, local, and municipal performance. As the portal into the state’s enterprise geographic information system (GIS), MD iMap also provides data to governments throughout the state including seamless, geocoded statewide centerlines and six-inch imagery. MD iMap embodies O’Malley’s vision of “one Maryland, one map.”

“In Maryland, GIS is vital to setting goals, tracking performance, and creating transparency,” said O’Malley. “We have been using GIS for years to increase government accountability and efficiency and to enhance transparency. With one comprehensive and interactive map for Maryland, our citizens will have access to unprecedented information online. From land conservation to public safety, the possibilities are endless when government becomes transparent and accountable to the citizens it serves.”

GreenPrint is the first GIS-based performance measurement application that is accessible via MD iMap. It is a planning tool designed to help government staff, conservation organizations, and individual citizens make good decisions about land conservation and growth. The state’s other performance measurement applications, including StateStat and BayStat, will be added soon.

To support government staff in Maryland, a secure agency login on the MD iMap Web site home page connects users to Maryland GIS Online, which is built with ArcGIS Online. On that site, staff can download data and Web services from other government entities in the state. In addition to significantly enhancing data sharing and coordination, the portal is innovative in its delivery of real-time, up-to-date statistics in one sleek, user-friendly interface.

“Governor O’Malley’s vision of one Maryland, one map, speaks to the best in government including accountability, unity, and service to citizens. It is also an outstanding example of a public and private partnership driving government forward,” said ESRI president Jack Dangermond.

Interact with the original at MDiMap . . .

Interactive San Francisco Airport Map (Kelso)

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

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[Editor's note: I happened on this interactive map from the San Francisco airport when I flew thru SFO this past weekend as I bid adieu to my California vacation. There is an airport overview and maps of each terminal. Gates, stores, food options, restrooms, and other features are located. Each feature is interactive with a tooltip and small description, including open hours for businesses, and full description in the bottom left corner. Category searches are available in the top left corner and the map will highlight with the appropriate location(s).]

Interact with the original at FlySFO . . .

sfairportsephora

Detail of map above shows result of a food and beverage category querry for the restraunt name.

Interactive: Obama’s Appointments (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

[Editor's note: I did the Flash ActionScript 3 programming behind Head Count: Tracking Obama's Appointments. This ambitious, collaborative database-driven project tracks the Obama administration’s senior political appointments and will be kept up-to-date with the latest happenings. A look at some of the interactive features you can find at washingtonpost.com/headcount.]

Interactive graphic and database by Sarah Cohen, Karen Yourish, Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, Ryan O’Neil, Paul Volpe, Sarah Sampsel and Laura Stanton.

This project draws on concepts from these two blog posts in particular: It Ain’t Easy To Get A Newspaper To Provide Useful Data (TechDirt) and The New Journalism: Goosing the Gray Lady (NY Times).

Republished from The Washington Post

Heads Pop Up and Heads Roll: Let’s Keep Track.
By Al Kamen; Wednesday, March 18, 2009; Page A11

Today we launch Head Count, The Washington Post’s interactive database to help you keep a sharp eye on the people President Obama is appointing to the nearly 500 top positions in the federal government that require Senate confirmation. The new feature will not only tell you who they are but also help you count all the demographic beans — age, sex, ethnicity, education (elite schools or not), home states and so on.

At http://www.washingtonpost.com/headcount, you can search agency by agency to determine which jobs are still open, should your private-sector job be looking a little shaky these days. You can also search by individual to determine how many officials in this “change” administration are merely retreads from the Clinton days.

And Head Count will give some clues to help answer everyone’s perennial question: How did that fool get that great job? It will also tell you who paid good, hard money or bundled huge sums for Obama/Biden, who worked on the campaign, who had the coveted Harvard Law connection, hailed from Chicago or was a pal of Michelle Obama, Tom Daschle or Ted Kennedy.

The appointments that are tracked by Head Count do not include judges, ambassadors, U.S. attorneys or U.S. marshals. We’ll monitor those separately. Nor does the database include the many important officials who are not confirmed by the Senate. We’ll be tweaking the database as we go, adding new categories, such as veterans, and making other additions.

Loop Fans can help! If you’ve got information we could use or suggestions about how to improve the site, please submit comments and updates at the link provided on the Head Count Web site.

NOMINATING PARTY

The White House personnel logjam — also known as the Great Daschle Debacle — appears to have been broken. Team Obama’s nominations operation began at a record pace. But IRS problems sparked Health and Human Services nominee Tom Daschle‘s withdrawal on Feb. 3, leading to a general revetting of nominees that stalled everything.

The numbers are startling. Obama, by the end of his first week in office, had announced 47 nominees for senior-most jobs. He’d officially nominated 37 of them, according to data compiled by New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service Presidential Transition Project. (That number includes some holdovers.)

But in the month after Daschle’s withdrawal, the White House announced only 10 candidates for Senate-confirmed positions and formally nominated only six people.

In the next three weeks, however, the pace ramped up sharply, with 42 nominees named. Official nominations have been slower — only 27 during that time. But there were 15 last week, and we’re told there are plenty in the pipeline. As of yesterday, there were 39 Senate-confirmed individuals on the job. (That includes seven holdovers.)

The push now is to get as many nominees up to the Senate — and get confirmation for the three dozen or so already up there — before the Senate slithers out of town on April 3.

View the interactive at The Washington Post . . .

Interactive Map: The Shaping of America (Atlantic Mag)

Friday, March 6th, 2009

[Editor's note: Interactive Google Maps mashup based in Flex (Flash) animating maps of 3 themes showing the US cities and how they stand to benefit or loose from the current economic crises. From the Atlantic, "Urban theorist Richard Florida explains how the current meltdown will forever change our geography." Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the Atlantic magazine.
Text by Richard Florida. Interactive by Charlie Szymanski.
March 2009 edition.

“No place in the United States is likely to escape a long and deep recession. Nonetheless, as the crisis continues to spread outward from New York, through industrial centers like Detroit, and into the Sun Belt, it will undoubtedly settle much more heavily on some places than on others. Some cities and regions will eventually spring back stronger than before. Others may never come back at all. As the crisis deepens, it will permanently and profoundly alter the country’s economic landscape. I believe it marks the end of a chapter in American economic history, and indeed, the end of a whole way of life.”

Continue reading full article at The Atlantic magazine . . .

View original interactive version. Two more views from the interactive.

Tag Cloud: Twitter Chatter During the Super Bowl (NY Times)

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

[Editor's note: The Times produced a fantastic interactive time-based tag-cloud-on-a-map showing twitter chatter across the US keyed to major events in the Super Bowl game between the Steelers and Cardinals. Several thematic channels are available. Kudos to Matthew Bloch and Shan Carter. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from The New York Times.
Orig pub date: Feb. 2, 2009.

As the Steelers and Cardinals battled on the field, Twitter users across the nation pecked out a steady stream of “tweets.” The map shows the location and frequency of commonly used words in Super Bowl related messages.

Interact with the original Flash version at New York Times . . .