Posts Tagged ‘kristin’

Found Map: Immigrant Roots, Immigrant Rights

Monday, August 10th, 2009

immigrant_roots_immigrant_rights

I saw this advocacy poster in the Adams Morgan area of Washington, DC this weekend. I love the metaphore and graphic technique, the United States a tree, the world it’s roots grouped by continent (another view). Not sure what organization put the poster together, perhaps the Arlington, Va. based NCIC?

iPhone app: Subway Suffle for Color Blind (Kelso)

Friday, March 27th, 2009

Kudos to the developer of Subway Suffle, my new favorite iPhone game, for including a “Better for color blind” mode in their game! This mode shifts the greens to a darker value making them easier to distinguish from the brighter red (see my blog post on this topic). Simple and elegant application preference solution that makes both audiences happy. Thanks Frank and Kristin!

Screenshots of game play below (normal vision mode):

Go to the iTunes store to buy or demo . . .

Grain Edit Graphics Design Blog

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

[Editor's note: Fun site to get inspiration. Thanks KL!]

Grain Edit is a blog focused on classic design work from the 1950s-1970s and contemporary designers that draw inspiration from that time period. Site content includes interviews, articles, designers’ libraries as well as examples of rare design annuals, type specimens, Ephemera, posters and vintage kids books from our bookshelves. Brought to us by: Dave Cuzner – Founder and Senior Editor, Ethan Davis- Editor, Grace Danico – Editor. Grain Edit is based in Oakland, California.

Go to the Grain Edit blog . . .

Ed Prado Museum Tour … Now on Google Earth (Duke CIT)

Tuesday, March 10th, 2009

[Editor's note: Google has started to add museum collections to Google Earth. The Prada in Madrid includes a self portrait by Albrecht Dürer, Las Meninas, the dark Goyas, and the Fusilamientos del Tres de Mayo. Video includes section on how Google took the photos. Thanks KL!]

Republished from the Duke
Original January 14th, 2009 by Randy Riddle.

Google has added the El Prado museum to Google Earth, allowing you to not only see the buildings, but to do a “virtual tour” of 14 paintings in the collections, viewing them in incredible detail – each painting is captured and presented in 14 billion pixels.

Below is a short video and you can also read a blog post at Gizmodo about the project.

Public Art in Google Street View (Good Mag)

Tuesday, November 11th, 2008

The Most Exciting Street in the World

[Editor's note: The Flash player version of Google Maps Street View below has full 360° movement like an image panorama, cool! Thanks Lynda and Kristin.]

Republished from Good Magazine. Posted by: Andrew Price on November 10, 2008.

Google’s Street View feature has captured private moments before, but “Street with a View” is the first example of public art we’ve seen that was designed specifically to be documented by Google’s roving cameras, and viewed online through Street View.

For “Street with a View,” artists Robin Hewlett and Ben Kinsley enlisted the help of a full cast of artists and performers to set up a series of tableaux—including a parade, a sword fight, a rooftop escape, and a perplexing giant chicken—along Sampsonia Way in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They then invited Google to drive through the scene and immortalize it in its Street View feature.

Take a stroll down fantastic Sampsonia Way via Street View here. There’s also the movie below, documenting the making of “Street with a View.”

The effect of combining Street View’s objective, documentary nature with these illusory, staged events is very Michel-Gondry-esque. We wonder how long it would have taken for people to stumble upon Sampsonia Way in Street View if the whole project had been kept secret. (Via PSFK)

On May 3rd 2008, artists Robin Hewlett and Ben Kinsley invited the Google Inc. Street View team and residents of Pittsburgh’s Northside to collaborate on a series of tableaux along Sampsonia Way. Neighbors, and other participants from around the city, staged scenes ranging from a parade and a marathon, to a garage band practice, a seventeenth century sword fight, a heroic rescue and much more…

Street View technicians captured 360-degree photographs of the street with the scenes in action and integrated the images into the Street View mapping platform. This first-ever artistic intervention in Google Street View made its debut on the web in November of 2008.