Posts Tagged ‘la’

Top GPS Searches and Places (Telenav)

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

[Editor's note: Interesting results from one of the in-car GPS companies. Food, businesses, states, and cities. Pizza, Walmart top the lists. Washington DC makes the top 10 list for metro cities. LA and DC rank tops for rerouting around traffic (those metros top for worst traffic in the US, so no surprise there).]

Republished from TeleNav.

Pizza, Los Angeles, and Walmart Any ideas what the three words have in common? Think about it and we’ll come back to it.

Life is busy. Very busy. Whether you have to rush to pick the kids up after soccer practice or zip to your next meeting, we know getting where you have to go with the least amount of hassle is important to you. And that’s where we come in.

They’re all at the top of a list.

  • The most preferred food of the TeleNav user on the move? You guessed it – pizza. This is based on search data from December 2009. Also on the list Chinese food, hamburgers, American food, and Mexican food. No word on whether New York or Chicago-style is preferred.

Continue reading at TeleNav . . .

Home Prices in Selected Cities, Through October 2009 (NY Times)

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

[Editor's note: Year-over price difference in 30 cities across the United States as an interactive chart.]

Republished from the New York Times.

Interact with the original . . . (Screenshot below)

nyt_home_values_chart

. Source: S&P/Case-Shiller

It Ain’t Easy To Get A Newspaper To Provide Useful Data (TechDirt)

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

[Editor's note: Interesting take on getting old media to get data friendly and generous: seeing the "value of data in addition to straight reporting, and the concept of openness compared to being a gatekeeper." Thanks Katharine!]

Republished from TechDirt. From the not-their-thing dept.

We’ve discussed in the past the idea that newspapers today need to get beyond reporting the news and also move towards opening up their data such that others can make that data useful. Newspapers have access to all sorts of interesting and useful data — but traditionally, they’ve hoarded it and only used it as a resource for editors and reporters in creating stories. However, by opening up that data to others, it could make those news organizations much more valuable. We’re seeing some movement in that direction, and recently noted that the NY Times had come out with an API for the campaign finance data it had. 

However, one thing that seems clear is that very few newspapers have the resources necessary to do this on a regular basis. The NY Times (and, to some extent, the Washington Post) seems to be willing to invest in this area, but for many newspapers, the entire concept seems foreign. Writing for OJR, Eric Ulken from the LA Times discusses how much effort it took to get the necessary resources just to build a homicide map to go along with a blogthat planned to chronicle every homicide in the LA area. If Ulken’s experience is any indication, it seems pretty clear that very, very few traditional news organizations are going to be able to pull this off. They’re just not set up to do such things. 

It seems increasingly clear that these types of innovations are more likely to come from newer news organizations who actually recognize the value of data in addition to straight reporting, and the concept of openness compared to being a gatekeeper.