Posts Tagged ‘Mashup’

“A super sophisticated mashup”: The semantic web’s promise and peril (Nieman Lab)

Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010

[Editor's note: Journalism, and the web in general, is finally catching up to GIScience and the transition from static paper maps to rich, digital maps that included data attributes (rather than graphically encoded attributes) and, more importantly, linking attributes. From Nieman Report's latest issue focusing on digital journalism.]

Republished from Nieman Journalism Lab.
By Andrew Finlayson
. June 17

In the movie Terminator, humanity started down the path to destruction when a supercomputer called Skynet started to become smarter on its own. I was reminded of that possibility during my research about the semantic web.

Never heard of the semantic web? I don’t blame you. Much of it is still in the lab, the plaything of academics and computer scientists. To hear some of them debate it, the semantic web will evolve, like Skynet, into an all powerful thing that can help us understand our world or create various crises when it starts to develop a form of connected intelligence.

Intrigued? I was. Particularly when I asked computer scientists about how this concept could change journalism in the next five years. The true believers say the semantic web could help journalists report complex ever-changing stories and reach new audiences. The critics doubt the semantic web will be anything but a high-tech fantasy. But even some of the doubters are willing to speculate that computers using pieces of the semantic Web will increasingly report much of the news in the not too distant future.

Continue reading at Nieman Reports . . .

Google Maps Elevation Web Services (Google)

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

screen-shot-2010-03-24-at-104824-pm

[Editor's note: A free, sans-API key solution from the web mapping giant for showing elevation (point or along custom path) for Google Maps Mashups either in the v3 API directly or separately as a stand-alone web service. And it returns JSON :) Thanks @lagerratrobe!]

Republished from Google.

The Google Elevation web service provides you a simple interface to query locations on the earth for elevation data. Additionally, you may request sampled elevation data along paths, allowing you to calculate elevation changes along routes.

The Elevation service provides elevation data for all locations on the surface of the earth, including depth locations on the ocean floor (which return negative values). In those cases where Google does not possess exact elevation measurements at the precise location you request, the service will interpolate and return an averaged value using the four nearest locations.

With the Elevation service, you can develop hiking and biking applications, mobile positioning applications, or low resolution surveying applications.

Check the documentation out over at Google . . .

ESRI 2010 Mashup Challenge

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

This one’s open to everyone. Cash prizes up to $10,000. Due March 5th. Thanks Dan!

Create an innovative mashup using ArcGIS Online and Web Mapping APIs for the chance to win one of four cash prizes. Awards will be based on originality, creativity, and analytic process.

Getting Started

  1. Build a mashup using ArcGIS Online and ESRI Web Mapping APIs.
  2. Shoot a video of your application and post it on YouTube.
  3. Submit your mashup. Deadline: March 5, 2010

Read more at ESRI . . .

A Peek Into Netflix Queues (NY Times)

Monday, January 11th, 2010

[Editor's note: Props to Matthew and Amanda at the New York Times for this Google Maps mashup by zip code (choropleth) of common Netflix rentals in selected U.S. metros. Easy to use interface based on Flash API still allows advanced options for sorting and mouseOver of "neighborhood" zipcodes  returns movie watching profile. Far more interesting than dry census stats ;)]

Republished from the New York Times.

Examine Netflix rental patterns, neighborhood by neighborhood, in a dozen cities. Some titles with distinct patterns are Mad Men, Obsessed and Last Chance Harvey.

Interact with the original at the New York Times . . . (Screenshot below.)

nytimes_netflixmap

By Matthew Bloch, Amanda Cox, Jo Craven McGinty and Kevin Quealy/The New York Times

Affordable Housing Mashup (Envisioning Development)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

wholiveshere

[Editor's note: Google mashup with fun charting trying to make sense out of simple yet complicated subject.]

Republished from EnvisioningDevelopment.net.

“Affordable Housing.” The phrase seems plain enough, but it doesn’t always mean what people think it does! It actually has a technical government definition that can determine what gets built and who lives there. Use these tools to answer the all-important question: “Affordable to whom?

What Is Affordable Housing? from the Center for Urban Pedagogy on Vimeo.

A stop-action animation on the technical definitions of affordable housing — by Rosten Woo and John Mangin of CUP, animator/designer Jeff Lai, and Glen Cummings of MTWTF. Narrated by Lisa Burriss. Sound by Rosten Woo.

Where is the Berlin Wall now? (BBC)

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009

[Editor's note: Twenty years ago this week the Berlin Wall came down (history from the Guardian) and with it the Cold War unraveled. I don't remember the Challengar exploding but I do remember watching the slabs fall on the late night news broadcast. Check out the wall in Vegas in this photo mashup from the BBC showing where pieces of the wall have ended up. Also read story in today's Washington Post about a school in Maryland which recreated the wall for a day.]

Republished from the BBC.

When the Berlin Wall fell down in November 1989, parts of it were chipped off and taken away by locals and tourists. Some people took segments as souvenirs and some pieces were given to institutions around the world.

Use this interactive map to see how far the wall has spread around the globe, and where large sections of it are on public display. If you have a piece of the wall, tell us using the form below.

(Screenshot below)

Interact with the original at the BBC . . .

bbc_berlin_wall_map_mashup

Find Water Polluters Near You (NY Times)

Monday, September 14th, 2009

nyt_polutors

[Editor's note: Slick interactive database & mashup from the New York Times highlights facilities around the United States that fail to meet basic environmental standards. Complementary choropleth map by state takes care of regional trends. Kudos to Derek W. et al.]

Republished from The New York Times. Sept. 13, 2009.

Across the nation, the system that Congress created to protect the nation’s waters under the Clean Water Act of 1972 today often fails to prevent pollution. The New York Times has compiled data on more than 200,000 facilities that have permits to discharge pollutants and collected responses from states regarding compliance. Information about facilities contained in this database comes from two sources: the Environmental Protection Agency and the California State Water Resources Control Board. The database does not contain information submitted by the states. Full Story »

Search the database & explore the map at the New York Times . . .

Where 2.0 2010 Dates and Location Announced (O’Reilly)

Thursday, August 20th, 2009

where2-2010

Republished from O’Reilly.

March 30 – April 1, 2010 at the San Jose, Marriott, CA.

The 2010 O’Reilly Where 2.0 Conference Call for Participation Is Now Open

Become Location Enabled at Where 2.0

Location awareness is everywhere now, baked into our desktops, iPhones, cameras–even our oil rigs–right from the start. We expect our tools to sense and interpret data to help us locate and visualize everything from a new restaurant to the source of a new millennium plague. Who is leading the charge to the next mapping frontier? How are companies large and small jumping in change the rules in mid-game? And where is the money?

O’Reilly Media is seeking proposals for sessions and workshops from the builders and innovators in the location industry. Are you a mobile maven creating rich information overlays? A GIS veteran mashing up temporal data with maps? An open source developer hacking up a cool visualization tool? A CIO using location information to revamp a public transit system?

If you’re passionate about enabling location awareness in our lives and our work, we want to hear from you. Submit a proposal to speak at Where 2.0 by October 13, 2009.

Topics we’ll be exploring at Where 2.0 2010 include:

  • Mobile Trends and Devices
  • Rich Analysis Tools
  • Augmented Reality
  • Temporal Information
  • Government 2.0
  • Machine Learning
  • Crisis Mapping and Disease Awareness
  • Local Search
  • Cartography
  • Geo Support in Web Application Frameworks
  • GeoStack and GeoBrowsers
  • Mapping APIs
  • GeoTargeting
  • Data Management
  • Local Search and Advertising
  • Protocols and Formats

Where 2.0 is one of the world’s foremost events dedicated to exploring the emerging technologies in the geospatial industry. At Where 2.0, we expose the tools pushing the boundaries of the location frontier, track the emergence of new business models and services, and examine new sources of data and the platforms for collecting them.

Happening March 30-April 1, 2010 at the San Jose Marriott in San Jose, California, Where 2.0 brings together the people, projects, and issues building the new technological foundations and creating value in the location industry. Join with other developers, technologists, CTOs, researchers, geographers, academics, business developers, and entrepreneurs to debate and discuss what’s viable now, and what’s lurking just below the radar. Learn more about Where 2.0.

Important Dates

The submission deadline for all proposals is October 13, 2009.
Early registration opens in December 2009.
Standard registration begins February 2010.

More information at O’Reilly . . .

Being the Fastest Is Not Enough (InfoGraphicsNews)

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

mapita22

[Editor's note: You'll start seeing more mashups on The Washington Post site the next month. Staff are being trained to use a new mashup maker tool I made that churns out decent maps in 5 minutes flat. Just like in print, normal rules about accuracy in reporting apply. The bottom line, don't show more location detail than you know to be true, as this blog post from InfoGraphicsNews illustrates. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the InfoGraphicsNews blog.
Original on 12/04/2008.

Yesterday, the terrosrist group ETA killed another person in Spain. In this cases, as most of the cases, internet media have the initative. The first idea is to place the new. Shw where it took place. But the problem is that in this kind of news all the information is changing all the time during the first hour, and the data are not accurate. Yesterday, we only knew that Ignacio Uria was killed while he was going to his favourite restaurant, Kiruri. We didn’t even knew if he came form his house or form his job.

The punch line:

None of those that placed the killing on a exact place were right.

Some rectified later, others didn’t even change it. Being the fastest can’t go before telling the truth. On reconstructions many editors use to say that “the reader know this is not exactly the truth, that we’re just guessing”. I don’t want the reader to not trust us. I prefer to have a reader who really think that when we say something we know it and we’re not guessing.
These are screenshots from some spanish websites two hours after the agencies gave the news:

Continue to view screenshots at InfoGraphicsNews blog . . .

MarkerClusterer in an All New Flavor – ActionScript! (GoogleGeoDev)

Friday, August 14th, 2009

[Editor's note: An AS3 Flash / Flex library for auto-clustering near map location markers into groups symbols. This speeds map rendering and groups points all within the same neighborhood, avoiding "red dot fever" marker overload. An AS3 implementation of existing JavaScript extension. Still needs to account for geographic region clustering (not just within a grid). Thanks Laris!]

Republished from Google Geo Developer Blog.
Monday, July 27, 200. 

My name is XIAO Juguang – just call me Juguang. I am a freelance software developer based in Beijing, China. Technically speaking, I’m double sided. On one side, I specialize in knowledge management and business modeling, traditionally using LAMP and now experimenting with offerings like Google App Engine. On the other side, I love visualization in time and space, with charts, trees, graphs, and maps, always using the power of ActionScript/Flex, with the help of open-source projects like Degrafa, Axiis, and Birdeye, and of course, APIs like the Google Maps API for Flash.

A few month ago, Xiaoxi Wu (also from China!) created the MarkerClusterer library for the Google Maps JavaScript API v2 and released it in their open source utility library. This library did automatic clustering of markers placed on a map, so that a large amount of markers wouldn’t overcrowd the map or overwhelm the user. This is a great technique for having a better performing map (see this talk for more tips on improving map performance), and the Flash map community immediately rushed to port the code to ActionScript. Developer Sean Toru posted the first port, a version that was only Flash-compatible, Ian Watkins modified that port to use Flex packages, and then I refactored the code to be more ActionScript-friendly and released it into the open-source library. It’s great when random strangers can collaborate together on a common code goal. :)

To see how the AS3 MarkerClusterer works, try out the demo (shown above). As you zoom and pan the map, you can witness how the markers are clustered and re-clustered. To learn how to use MarkerClusterer on your own map, view the source code of the demo. To use the library, check out the source code and import it into your project.

The current algorithm is quite simple, just clustering markers in a grid and using static images for the cluster markers. Future extensions could include support for regional clustering or using arbitrary DisplayObjects for the cluster markers. If you’re interested in extending the library, join the project.