Posts Tagged ‘Mashup’

MAP: Tropical Storm Hanna (Kelso)

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2008

[Editor's note: I produced this mashup in real time for The Washington Post a couple weekend's ago when Hurricane Hanna blew into the DC area as a tropical storm. This mashup was the main graphic lead on the homepage for a couple hours. A week later, the Houston Chronicle pulled off a similar exercise for Gustov.]

View and interact with the original on washingtonpost.com.

legendThis mashup tracked flooding, road closures, major power outages, and other storm related events across the Washington, D.C. metro area on Saturday, Sept. 6.

The live map was last updated at 7:05 pm. and shows conditions at that time. No further updates will be provided.

Follow Hurricane Hanna at Capital Weather Gang blog. View flooding status of regional rivers from USGS.

SOURCES: Staff reports; Power outages: PEPCO, BGE, SMECO and Dominion; Road conditions: www.511virginia.org, Maryland CHART, Fairfax. Interactive by Nathaniel V. Kelso and Dita Smith -The Washington Post.

First published Sept. 6, 2008. Last updated Sept. 6, 2008 at 7:05 p.m.

Using Google Maps to Visualize ArcGIS Data & Services (Google Geo Dev. Blog)

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008

[Editor's note: This blog joint blog post from ESRI and Google has examples on how to integrate the new 9.4 features with Google Maps Mashups. This includes all the power of GIS geo-processing leveraged into the Mashup environment. I hope this trend continues with the promised release of a Flash/Flex API for ArcGIS.]

Reprinted from Google Geo Developers Blog. Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Hi, I’m Sterling Quinn and I work on the development team for server-based GIS technologies at ESRI in Redlands, California. We’re happy to report that ESRI software users can now expose their GIS in Google Maps through the recently-released ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for the Google Maps API. The extension is built on the Google Maps API and is designed to communicate with ArcGIS Server, ESRI’s product for serving GIS functionality on the Web.

The ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for the Google Maps API allows you to maintain the user-friendly front end of Google Maps while tapping into an advanced GIS on the back end. You can use the extension to display your own maps on top of Google’s, query features in your database and display them on the map, or expose tasks that run GIS analysis models on the server. You can display your results using the Google Maps API’s native graphics engine and info windows.

To learn how to use the ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for the Google Maps API, use the online SDK, which contains basic concepts, an API reference, and examples of how to create custom maps and Mapplets. The examples contain detailed descriptions on how to do things like adding an ArcGIS Server map type button,displaying query results as KML, or running a task on the server to return a route and elevation profile.

Following are some quick links to example Mapplets built with the ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for the Google Maps API. For those of you who don’t know, Mapplets are mini applications that you can add to Google Maps in the “My Maps” tab and are nifty because a user can enable multiple Mapplets at a time.

Cached Map ServiceDisplays an ArcGIS tiled map service over the Google base map.

Census Block QueryRetrieves US Census data from an ArcGIS map service at a point you click and displays it in a series of charts created with the Google Chart API.

Message in a BottleUses an ArcGIS geoprocessing service to tell you where a bottle would drift if you dropped it in the ocean.

Service Area AnalysisUses an ArcGIS geoprocessing service to display drive time polygons from a point you click.

Terrain-Shaded Relief In Google Maps (Free Geog Tools)

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2008

free geo tools logoReprinted from Free Geography Tools blog (posted there May 8, 2007).

The Geolabels website offers another image option button for Google Maps, along with the standard Map, Satellite, and Hybrid buttons: Relief. This button gives you views of the terrain in an area, shaded by light at an angle and color.

Go to the website, and either zoom in on an area of interest, or enter the name of a populated place in the box at the upper left and click “Go” (if you hit “Enter” after typing in the name, you’re likely to get an error screen). At left, you will get a list of world localities in the database that match that name; click on one, and the map will zoom in on that location (click on the image for a larger view):

You will also get a marker at the location of the name you entered, along with a message box showing latitude and longitude to way too many decimal places. You can zoom in for a closer view:

Or zoom out:

Major rivers and bodies of water, major highways, and populated places are also shown on the map. Keep in mind, though, that the color shading represents altitude, not vegetation, e.g. in the image above, all that green around Phoenix definitely doesn’t represent lush vegetation. Other sites offer contours or topo maps in the Google Maps interface, but the Geolabels website is a nice complement to them.

Modified 8/26/07 to update URL.

Land Contracts, Sales Go To Johnson Associates (Kelso via TWP)

Sunday, July 6th, 2008

[Editor’s note: This is my third map that refines the mashup template I’ve been developing for The Washington Post. Data is loaded via XML so the producer doesn’t need to edit the HTML. Option to enable the auto-generated legend below the map (the pop-menu above the map is part of the “legend”). MouseOver tooltip behavior tells the user what the markers are called before they click on them to get full details. Option to zoom in on marker click and get satellite map when the info window is called up.

My favorite feature: on close of the information window that resulted from that marker click the map pans / zooms back to it’s prior location. No more “where was I” moments so common with mashups! Goes with an investigative piece, read that here.

WEB EDITOR: Juana Summers — washingtonpost.com. REPORTERS: Cheryl W. Thompson and Mary Pat Flaherty — The Washington Post. Interactive by Nathaniel V. Kelso — The Washington Post. First published June 6, 2008.]

Since County Executive Jack B. Johnson took office in December 2002, his administration has agreed at least 11 times to sell public land to people with ties to Johnson, including a former business partner, a current business partner and several campaign contributors. Johnson said he has not been involved in awarding any of the contracts and has ordered a review of county procedures for selling public land. Those who won the deals said they were not given special treatment. The projects are mapped below.

Interactive graphic mirrored below. Original available here.

Montgomery Lifts Boil Water Advisory (Mashup)

Thursday, June 19th, 2008

mo co water restrictions mashup screenshot

I produced an interactive Google Maps mashup on Tuesday, updated Wednesday for The Washington Post showing the area affected by a major disruption in WSSC water service in suburban Washington DC in Montgomery County, Maryland. The mashup also allows readers to plot their own home or business address onto the map to discover if they fall in the affected area. A similar mashup (without the searchability) received over 100,000 hits on the WSSC water utility site! No word on how many saw mine.

Related Washington Post article here by Dan Morse and Katherine Shaver.

Google Maps Coming to Media, AIR Desktops, via Flash API

Wednesday, May 21st, 2008

Reprinted from  Read Write Web blog (original post here).

 

Written by Marshall Kirkpatrick / May 14, 2008 11:30 AM 


At the Where 2.0 conference today [May 14th] Google announced the availability of a new Flash API for Google Maps. From Flash microsites to embedded media players to beautiful cross-platform AIR apps on the desktop – expect to start seeing interactive Google Maps embedded in a lot of unusual places soon.

A substantial portion of the web’s creativity can be found in the Flash developer community.

Adobe’s AIR platform is one of the hottest development environments in the consumer market today and is being deployed with increasing frequency in the enterprise as well. Live Google Maps in Flash are likely to be used in even more creative ways than the existing javascript API has been. Javascript can be used in AIR but it’s rarely used as attractively as Flash often is.

Too much Flash can be very annoying, but offering Google Maps in Flash only makes sense. We’re excited to see what developers do with it, and we’re far from alone in that excitement.

Greg Sadetsky, CEO of map savvy open source R&D lab Poly9, wrote this morning that “This is great news. There has been a long wait for Google to release an official Flash API for their popular Maps product.” ZDNet’s Google-watching Garett Rogers appeared to have unearthed the API hours before it was presented at the conference, that’s how we knew to start looking around.

Mapping is Hot

The mapping world is exploding right now; from the release of the giant Yahoo! Geo-location database API this week, to the release of control over KML mapping markup by Google last month and the groundswell of developer interest in location-aware applications and frameworks.

Throw some Flash Google Maps into the mix and things are liable to really get interesting. Check out this adorable little Flash Map below.

Google Maps API for Flash

Wednesday, May 21st, 2008

Reprinted from The Map Room blog (original post here). The Google Maps API now has a Flash version, alongside its regular JavaScript and static versions. On the Google Maps API blog, Mike Jones writes:

So, what do I like about the API for Flash? Smoothness and speed are a big part of it. We’ve designed it so that Flash graphics can be used for each tile layer, marker and info window — opening up possibilities like dynamic shading, shadowing, animation, and video. When the user zooms the map, magnification changes happen smoothly and place names fade in. After the user drags a marker, it gently bounces to a halt. Generally, Flash allows for much greater embellishment, and, well … “flashiness.” I get excited just thinking about the creative ways developers might take advantage of having a Flash API for Google Maps.

See also Google LatLong. Apparently the idea is to embed this in Flash-based applications.

10 Examples Using The New Google Maps API For Flash

Wednesday, May 21st, 2008

Reprinted from Flash Speaks ActionScript (original post here).

These examples are from the API tutorials from Google.  Until now Google Maps via the Flash platform hasn’t been available unless you’ve been using the the UMAP component from AFComponents. As you may have heard, Google has opened up its API to the Flash and Flex community. This is huge as it offers more possibilities for Rich Interactive Applications and Google Maps. To find more info on Google Maps for Flash, check out Google’s official blog.

Check out the these examples using the new Google Maps for Flash API:

google_maps_example
Video Sync Map
A map pans and updates while a synchronized video shows footage from the city highlighted on the map.

 

Custom Local Searcher

 

Local Searcher
Displays a Flex UI with ComboBox, Button, and TextField that are used to perform a local search with the AJAX Local Search API.

campus map

Custom Campus Map
Creates a custom map by extending TileLayerBase to load in USC image tiles.

geo_map
Form Geocoding
Shows how to take a user-entered address from a Flex TextField, geocode it, and display the result as a map marker.

control options
Control Options
Shows how to customize the display of MapTypeControl and OverviewMapControl using their associated options classes.

draggable marker
Draggable Marker
Shows how to create a draggable marker and respond to its dragstart and dragend events.

custom tiles map
Custom Tiles Map
Creates a custom map that displays tiles that are actually Sprites displaying information about the tile x/y/z.

texture zoom
TextualZoom Control
Shows how to extend ControlBase to create a custom control with buttons for zooming in and zooming out.

encodded polyline
Encoded Polyline
Shows how to create a Polyline from an encoded points and encoded levels string.

flip map

Photo Flip Map
Locations in Las Vegas are plotted on the map with a small photo showing up inline; the view can be “flipped” to show a larger photo without the map. 

You can check the rest of the demos at the Google Maps API for Flash Demo Gallery.

Here’s a Quick Question:
Who will build the first feature-rich Google Maps AIR application? I’d love to see one or two!

ESRI to also support Flash interface

Monday, May 12th, 2008

Why are mashups via ESRI important? It will allow cartographers to create custom maps with our own look-and-feel, with thematic data, and still be fully enabled with the “mashup” web 2.0 mentality using APIs similar to those from Google and Yahoo.

The earlier post mentions a REST javascript API for interfacing with the Arc Server to create mashups. That’s true in the first release, but a followup release will allow Flash / Flex integration as well. 

Read more from flex888.com and see an example

More info on the REST api from mandownnz.com.

Newsflash! ESRI to best Google Maps with Mashup Capability

Monday, May 12th, 2008

(Reprinted from flex888.com. View original post.)

Finally, GeoWeb is Complete and Born

Posted by Moxie | March 19, 2008 .

What’s is the best RIA application ever created? If your answer is something aroundFlex or Flash, then it’ll be wrong answer. The right answer is Google Map. It’s Google Map makes AJAX known and RIA a reality. Google even goes above and beyond claimed the term “GeoWeb“. However, up till now, Google Map is still just the best client, the visualization end, of GeoWeb. The “Geo” part of GeoWeb was missing.

Yesterday, ESRI, the shy, but true and real “Geo” dude behind all, I mean ALL, the web map buzz and technologies, released its very own JavaScript API and REST based Geo Process services to the world. The GeoWeb is finally complete and born.

The JavaScript API has three parts, the ESRI JavaScript API, the Google Map extension, the Virtual Earth extension. That means you can use the top three GeoWeb clients with this simple API to do the real “Geo” things.

What is the “Geo” things and why it’s a big deal to GeoWeb?

Well, everyone and his/her grandma knows what Google Map does, plans the trip and shows locations. What’s the most mashed up platform? Google Map. What 99% Google Map mashup applications do? Put pins (markers) on the map? But what if we want to ask some questions beyond the pushpins:

  • Within 5 minutes driving time, show me the areas that I can reach. Don’t fool me with a circle. That is cheating. Because there might be highway, service street, or river among the 5 minutes driving range. The area you can cover by driving is a irregular polygon. But how do you get that polygon drawn on the map to show the 5 minute driving range?
  • Three of my friends want to meet for lunch. We want to meet at a Starbucks where everybody has the least driving time to get there. Fair enough? But how do you quickly give me that Starbucks location and provide driving direction for each of us.

The questions can go on and on. How these questions are answered? Through a thing called Geoprocessing, which is provided by the technology called GIS (geographic information system). But why you’ve never heard of it and it’s not well known in the Web 2.0 space? That’s because it’s a very hard nut to crack and only a few dudes know how to do it inside out. ESRI is the one does it the best, and now, it gets everything figured it out. The whole web can have it.

If I tell you, with three lines of JavaScript codes, plus some regular JavaScript programming you can easily answer the above question visually on either ESRI map, Google Map or Earth Map. Do you believe me?

You don’t have to because I’ll show you how.

First Line:

    var map = new esri.Map(“mapDiv”, { extent: startExtent });

Looks familiar, isn’t it. Indeed, it’s just like Google Map or Virtual Earth API.

Second Line:

    var streetMap = new esri.layers.ArcGISTiledMapServiceLayer
(“http://server.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services/
ESRI_StreetMap_World_2D/MapServer”);

Something new here. Well, if you head to ArcGIS Online, a free gwoweb resource from ESRI, you would find out there are lots of good free base maps you can choose. Or, you can use any map published to a ArcGIS Server. It’s long story here for those map publishing goodies, I’ll tell you later, piece by piece. But just you know this line of code gives you a whole big world of maps to works with. Just remembering that is enough for now.

Third Line:

var gp = new esri.tasks.Geoprocessor
(“http://sampleserver1.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services/
Network/ESRI_DriveTime_US/ GPServer/CreateDriveTimePolygons”);

This is “Geo” part of the GeoWeb. One line, it consumes a geoprocess, in this case, a services called CreateDriveTimePolygons. This geoprocess called is actually via REST API (as the URL reveals) . The returned result can be in JSON, KML or XML. That means you really don’t have to use this JavaScript API. As matter of fact, I do have Perl or PHPexamples consume the very same gepprocess, but that’ll be another post.

The rest code is really just parse the result and draw the polygon on the map. If you know Google Map API, there are no surprises there.

The following is the true GeoWeb application I’ve introduced to you. You can zoom in to any city just like you would do with gmap (scrolling mouse, drag the map, etc.). Then click the map. The 1, 3 and 5 minutes driving time polygon will be shown.

Click Here to Run the Application (view source for detail code).

I will post another example to solve that other problem using Flex. Stay tuned.