Posts Tagged ‘microsoft virtual earth’

Where is the Berlin Wall now? (BBC)

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009

[Editor's note: Twenty years ago this week the Berlin Wall came down (history from the Guardian) and with it the Cold War unraveled. I don't remember the Challengar exploding but I do remember watching the slabs fall on the late night news broadcast. Check out the wall in Vegas in this photo mashup from the BBC showing where pieces of the wall have ended up. Also read story in today's Washington Post about a school in Maryland which recreated the wall for a day.]

Republished from the BBC.

When the Berlin Wall fell down in November 1989, parts of it were chipped off and taken away by locals and tourists. Some people took segments as souvenirs and some pieces were given to institutions around the world.

Use this interactive map to see how far the wall has spread around the globe, and where large sections of it are on public display. If you have a piece of the wall, tell us using the form below.

(Screenshot below)

Interact with the original at the BBC . . .

bbc_berlin_wall_map_mashup

How Can You Tell What Map Scales Are Shown For Online Maps? (ESRI)

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

scales_table

[Editor's note: I'm working on a group base map project that will be released in October that is for mapping at the 1:10,000,000 (1:10m) scale and smaller (regional continental to global at small print dimensions). I want this data to be easily used with online mapping services, but converting Google map tile set "levels" to natural scale equivelants isn't obvious. I remembered seeing this table at last year's NACIS conference in Missoula, Montana. Charlie Frye was kind enough to remind me where to find it on the ESRI site.]

Republished from ESRI Mapping Center.

As you zoom in (or out) of the online maps you see on Virtual Earth (VE) or Google Maps (GM), you are actually seeing a series of different maps with slightly different information displayed at each zoom level. Zoom level is indicated and controlled in an online map by the vertical zoom slider, like the one shown at the left in the image here. Whenever the zoom level is changed, a different map is shown.

Of course, these maps are well designed so that viewers are largely unaware that they are seeing these different maps. The foundation for good design of an “online map” hinges on understanding how to design for each of the zoom level represented in the entire online map. Colors, fonts, number of and types of features, etc. are all seriously considered when each of the maps is created for each of the zoom levels.

When authoring this kind of online map with ArcGIS, a map document containing group layers, one for each zoom level, is a good approach. (The Working with layers and scale ranges blog entry provides a good overview of how to organize a map document this way.) Each zoom level in the online map is represented by your work at a specific map scale in the ArcMap document. The hard part is to figure out which zoom level matches to which map scale. There are twenty zoom levels for Virtual Earth or Google Maps. The corresponding map scales that you would design and create your maps at if you wanted them to mash up on VE or GM are:

Continue reading at ESRI Mapping Center . . .

ESRI ArcMap Web Mashup Services (Recap)

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008

The Spring edition of ArcNews recaps some important ESRI announcements about version 9.3′s ability to create mashups on par with Google Maps that were announced at the 2008 ESRI Developer Summit. More than 1,200 developers representing 69 organizations in 49 countries attended the conference. Images and summaries below from ESRI. [ ] enclose my comments.

esri 2008 conf 1

“The ArcGIS 9.3 platform places a much greater emphasis on the Web,” said [Scott] Morehouse [director of Software Development at ESRI]. “The technology platform for GIS has evolved over the years. Initially, the focus was on leveraging minicomputers and workstations with an emphasis on high-performance computing and end-user interactivity. Then, the focus shifted to the database with an emphasis on information modeling and transactional data management. Now, the focus is on the Web. We have been working to put the Web at the center of everything that we’re doing with the ArcGIS system.”

JavaScript and REST APIs

The new APIs were showcased at the Plenary Session and in technical sessions presented by the ArcGIS engineers who developed them. In the REST API session, there were demonstrations of how to use JavaScript, Python, Ruby, and Yahoo! Pipes to access backend REST services powered and published by ArcGIS Server. All resources and operations exposed by the REST API are accessible through a URL.

In the ArcGIS JavaScript APIs session, there were demonstrations on how mashups can be built using JavaScript with REST that add map layers and tasks from ArcGIS Server to Google Maps and Microsoft Virtual Earth. The JavaScript API comes in three flavors: ArcGIS JavaScript API, ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for Microsoft Virtual Earth, and ArcGIS JavaScript Extension for Google Maps. [A Flash based API is also planned].

ArcGIS Server 9.3 Offers New and Enhanced Support for OGC Standards

At 9.3, ArcGIS Server provides enhanced support for the three leading Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web standards: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS), and Web Coverage Service (WCS). In addition, with the recent announcement from OGC that Keyhole Markup Language (KML) 2.2 is now an official OGC standard, ArcGIS Server at 9.3 will comply with the OGC KML specification by allowing users to publish their geographic data as KML 2.2. Read more.

esri 2008 conf 3

New Features in ArcGIS Engine 9.3 Coming Soon

ArcGIS Engine developers can also now use the integrated Eclipse 3.3 plug-in to inspect the state of ArcObjects. In addition, ArcGIS Engine 9.3 supports the Java Development Kit version 6 on the latest platforms. Read more.