Posts Tagged ‘money’

And Now, a Word on the Convention Sponsors (Kelso)

Wednesday, August 27th, 2008

[Editor's note: Below is the interactive I just published in the Washington Post examining the sponsors of this week's Democratic and next week's Republican conventions. Does money influence politics? Use this tool to explore further. Features thematic map with proportional circles showing number of contributions and dollar value of contributions by state and a data table listing of those companies and if they tend to give more to Democrats or Republicans. Reads data in from XML file and programatically draws the proportional circles. Republished from the Washington Post.]

Corporations, unions and wealthy donors are allowed to pour unlimited cash into the host committees that finance presidential conventions in exchange for goodies such as private receptions with legislators and VIP access to special events. Most of the corporate sponsors revealed so far for Denver and St. Paul (the host committees do not have to disclose donors or how much they raise until 60 days after the convention) are veterans of Washington’s money-for-influence game.

Use the interactive below to see how they have contributed more than $180 million to federal campaigns since 2005.

SOURCES: Campaign Finance Institute, Center for Responsive Politics

CREDIT: Interactive by Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso and Karen Yourish – The Washington Post. – August 27, 2008

Change We Can Believe In

Sunday, June 15th, 2008

No, this is not a post about the U.S. presidential campaign. Rather, about the seemingly lost art of engraving. Yup, the same engraving used to make maps of yesteryear and still used (or under used) when coining and printing modern currency. Hip as the new quarters make the mint, they are still inferior works of art. When given a canvas of metal, treat it like metal and not plastic!

Reprinted from Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Original post. Thanks Peter!

new british money


Above, the new face of British currency, announced by the Royal Mint. The striking new designs, selected from an open competition that attracted four thousand entries, are the work of a 26-year old graphic designer named Matthew Dent. They are Mr. Dent’s first foray into currency design.

Below, the new five dollar bill, introduced last month by the United States Department of the Treasury. The new design, which features a big purple Helvetica five, is the work of a 147-year-old government agency called the United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing. It employs 2,500 people, and has an annual budget of $525,000,000. —JH

five spot us