Posts Tagged ‘movie’

Tintin Map: Travels of a Boy Reporter (TinTinMovie.org)

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

[Editor's note: This map from a fan-boy website promoting the upcoming Tin Tin film, "The Adventures of Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn" (directed by Steven Spielberg and due in theatres October 2011), is a whirlwind tour around the globe. Created by Herge, pen name for Georges Remi, the series of graphic novels has delighted readers in many languages for more than 80 years. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from TinTinMovie.org.

It seemed like such a simple idea, creating a map of Tintin’s journeys around the world. An idea so simple that I could do it over the holidays between Christmas and New Year. Five months later and I’m finally nearing completion.

The Devil is in the Detail

Herge is renown for the accuracy and detail he put into his work. The carefully referenced images of foreign countries, the painstakingly researched planes or the spacecraft he designed are as much part of the adventures of Tintin as the Tintin himself. Yet when I came to look at the geography behind Tintin’s stories, it became apparent that Herge had a very relaxed view of where things were in the world.

Take, for example, the question of where Tintin lives. In Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, it is clear that Tintin lives in Brussels. However in the Crab with the Golden Claw, The Shooting Star and The Secret of the Unicorn our hero regularly pops out to visit the docks. A neat feat because Brussels is 30 miles from the coast. [ @hairydalek has pointed out that Brussels has canals and the Bassin Vergote ]. Many similar problems exist. In the Cigars of the Pharaoh, how did Tintin fly from Khemed to Gaipajama, a distance of not less than 1000 miles, in a 1930’s airplane without refueling?

Map Detail Flight 714Flight 714 to Syndey

Yet at other times Herge is incredibly precise about where Tintin is. The Shooting Star and Red Rackham’s Treasure both contain specific map references. In Flight 714 to Sydney the pilot Piotr Skut navigates via two minor radio beacons in Indonesian, both of which are on the logical route to Sydney. Herge must of carefully researched this route. Even right back in the beginning, in Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, the train journey back to Brussels is full of accurate observations about towns he passes through.

Continue reading at TinTinMovie.com . . .

View detailed map and download desktop wallpapers.

mapdownload1024096

Script: Find and Replace Graphics version 2

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008

ai cs3 logoToday’s script installment is Find and Replace Graphics version 2.

Download script (13k file size).

Please give this script a whirl. Email me with bugs or feature enhancements.

find and replace graphics version 2 demo movie screenshot

Watch a movie demo of the script with voiceover! (2.2 mb)

Important Enhancements:

  1. The find-replace objects now remain on their original layer. No more error alerts about locked layers.
  2. The find-replace object are now in the same z-stacking (object stacking) order as the original.
  3. "Replacing" master object is now deleted once it has replaced all the find objects. Turn this off by changing line 43: var deleteReplaceWithObj = false;
  4. Centered, non-scaled XY placement is default.
  5. If non-proportional scaling is desired change line 37 to: var scaledObject = true;

Future Work:

  1. Proportional scaling in X, Y, or weighted XY that is still centered on the original object’s center point.

To install new scripts you need to:

  • Quit Illustrator
  • Copy the files into the Illustrator application folder’s “Presets” » “Scripts” subfolder
  • After restarting Illustrator you can find the scripts in the menu “File” » “Scripts”;
  • TIP: You can create subfolders in the scripts folder to organize your scripts

Script: Make Point Type version 3

Tuesday, April 1st, 2008

ai cs3 logoToday’s script installment is Make Point Type version 3. Version 2 was never released widely.

Download script (10k file size).

Please give this script a whirl. Email me with bugs or feature enhancements.

make point type demo movie image

Watch a movie demo of the script with voiceover! (2.1 mb)

Important Enhancements:

  1. The text objects now remains on their parent layer that it was found in. No more error alerts about locked layers.
  2. The type is EXACTLY in the same X-Y position it was as area type. No more small jump in Y layout.
  3. Rotated type is fully supported, even upside down type (must be a rectangular area).
  4. Type on a path now reflects the original XY position and the former curve is approximated with rotation.
  5. Type on a path conversion can be turned on by changing line 19 to true: var convertPathType = true;

Continuing Issues:

  1. In some rare cases the type will be flipped 180° (upside down).

To install new scripts you need to:

  • Quit Illustrator
  • Copy the files into the Illustrator application folder’s “Presets” » “Scripts” subfolder
  • After restarting Illustrator you can find the scripts in the menu “File” » “Scripts”;
  • TIP: You can create subfolders in the scripts folder to organize your scripts

The Ebb and Flow of Movies: Box Office Receipts 1986 – 2007 (NY Times)

Wednesday, March 5th, 2008

In time for this year’s Oscars (okay, last month) the New York Times produced this fascinating graphic showing box office receipts for recent films. Amanda Cox lead in the original print graphic and was assisted by Mathew Bloch, Lee Byron, and Shan Carter. The print version only went back a year (2007) and had a vertical orientation but the interactive version, linked here, goes back 20 years horizontally and is more immersive, allowing the user to query individual film “bubbles” or “threads” by name on mouseOver or by using the search box. I’ve a few ideas how it was created but the overall effect is artful while retaining a sine-waved influenced precision. Would have been nice to add the actual box office revenue figures to the mouseOvers.

ny times movie graphic big thumbny times movie graphic legend

UPDATE (6 Mar 2008)

The Times site has some discussion of this graphic:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/25/business/media/25asktheeditors.html?pagewanted=5

A mystery software from Lee Bryan was used to make the chart.

However, if I were to create a similar graphic, I’d start in Excel and create two filled and stacked bar charts. For each chart I’d take half the films selected (some box office hits, some duds to even things out). These are time series where much of the time axis has 0 data values until the opening of the film. Then a big opening weekend and finally trailing off with a long tail till ending its box office run and then 0 values past that date. The data was weekly and there are 52 weeks in a year so 1040 total entries for each film. Open both charts into Illustrator. Now flip one so it formed the “bottom” half of this graphic. In the print version that would be the “left” and “right” halves. Join the two up along the common seam. Run a script or plugin to pull out the anchor points on each vertex for the bar chart fills, this gives it that nice curvy look. Then use the warp tool in Illustrator to give it the sine-wave effect by running it manually along the seam. Then fine tune the final result till it looks nice. The same thing can be done programatically by applying a sine wave to the data points (more effect closer to the seam, less far away).

Two solutions to smoothing out the sharply angled stacked area chart imported from Excel are:

  1. A free function in Illustrator CS3:
    Just select the anchor points with the hollow arrow selection tool and then there are extra settings in the control panel for changing the points to curve (and back to hard angle).
  2. A pay plug-in for earlier Illustrator versions:

    http://www.nineblock.com/products.html#betterhandles_prod