Posts Tagged ‘natural earth vector’

Prepping for NACIS, The World According to Ronald Reagan

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009

I’m crazy busy prepping for NACIS, wrapping up Natural Earth, and catching up on life. That being the case, I’m taking a little blog vacation. I’ll pick up posting here on the 14th of October.

In the meantime, in honor of the NACIS conference’s Sacramento location, here’s a mental map of The World According to Ronald Reagan:

the-world-according-to-ronald-reagan

Limitations on Passport Use (Wikipedia)

Monday, September 14th, 2009

[Editor’s note: I dug up this interesting list of sovereign states who have passport problems at Wikipedia while working on Natural Earth.]

Most countries accept passports of other countries as valid for international travel and valid for entry. There are exceptions, such as when a country does not recognise the passport-issuing country as a sovereign state. Likewise, the passport-issuing country may also stamp restrictions on the passports of its citizens not to go to certain countries due to poor or non-existent foreign relations, or security or health risks.

Continue reading at Wikipedia . . .

Finding Duplicate Points in a Shapefile

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009

[Editor's note: When building the 6,600 cities for Natural Earth vector, we had 6 extra townspots than town labels. Bound to happen on larger projects. One could take the halving approach and select half, see if the number of symbols matches the number of text objects, if so skip, if not subdivide in 1/2 again and reevaluate. Or if you use MaPublisher with Illustrator and/or Vectorworks to export out as a SHP file, we can open the DBF up in Excel and use the "countif" function and "conditional formatting" to quickly identify the exact features to resolve. By sorting the resulting "true" and "false" columns on lat, long, and feature name, we can quickly evaluate if there are multiple features at the same geographic location and compare their names. If they are the same name, assume 1 is a duplicate and remove it.]

Republished from Microsoft.

You can locate duplicates in a range of data by using conditional formatting and the COUNTIF function. Here are the details on how to make that work.

Set up the first conditional formatting formula

I’ll start by setting up a conditional format for the first data cell. Later, I’ll copy that conditional format for the whole range.

In my example, cell A1 contains a column heading (Invoice), so I will select cell A2, and then click Conditional Formatting on the Format menu. The Conditional Formatting dialog box opens. The first box contains the text, Cell Value Is. If you click the arrow next to this box, you can choose Formula Is.

Example

After you click Formula Is, the dialog box changes appearance. Instead of boxes for between x and y, there is now a single formula box. This formula box is incredibly powerful. You can use it to enter any formula that you can dream up, as long as that formula will evaluate to TRUE or FALSE.

In this case, we need to use a COUNTIF formula. The formula to type in the box is:


=COUNTIF(A:A,A2)>1

This formula says: Look through the entire range of column A. Count how many cells in that range have the same value as cell A2. Then, compare to see if that count is greater than 1.

When there are no duplicates, the count will always be 1; because cell A2 is in the range, we should find exactly one cell in column A that contains the same value as A2.

Note In this formula, A2 represents the current cell — that is, the cell for which you are setting up the conditional format. So, if your data is in column E and you are setting up the first conditional format in cell E5, the formula would be =COUNTIF(E:E,E5)>1.

Choose a color to highlight duplicated entries

Now it is time to select an obnoxious (that is, obvious) format to identify any duplicates that are found. In the Conditional Formatting dialog box, click the Format button.

Example

Click the Patterns tab and click a bright color swatch, like red or yellow. Then click OK to close the Format Cells dialog box.

Example

You will see the selected format in the preview box. Click OK to close the Conditional Formatting dialog box, and…

Example

Nothing happens. Wow. If this is your first time setting up conditional formatting, it would be really nice to get some feedback here that it worked. But, unless you are lucky enough that the data in cell A2 is a duplicate of the data in some other cell, the condition is FALSE and no formatting is applied.

Continue reading at Microsoft . . .

Old Troubles Threaten Again in Bosnia (Wash Post)

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009

gr2009082300821

[Editor's note: Before working on Natural Earth Vector, I had no idea Bosnia was composed into two countries awkwardly joined into one state. As the following article from this Sunday's Washington Post explains, the war that ended 14 years ago did little to solve the conflict. Map by Gene Thorp using Landscan population estimates at 1km grid resolution, mashed up with ethnic distribution map by administrative district.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Craig Whitlock. Sunday, August 23, 2009

14 Years After War, Leaders Suggest U.S. Should Step In to Rewrite Treaty

SARAJEVO, Bosnia — Fourteen years after the United States and NATO intervened to stop war and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, the old divisions and hatreds are again gripping this Balkan country.

In June, the international envoy who oversees the rebuilding of Bosnia invoked emergency powers that he said were necessary to hold the country together. Although U.S. and European officials have been trying to get Bosnia to stand on its own feet for years, many Bosnian leaders say the only thing that can permanently fix their gridlocked government is for Washington to intervene — again — and rewrite the treaty that ended the war in 1995.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Natural Earth Vector Preview: Cities

Tuesday, August 18th, 2009

We’re closing in on having the cities for Natural Earth Vector complete. The final compilation has been made (focusing on a universal coverage based on regional importance, even if the town has less than typical population). Dick Furno has headed up this data theme and is half way thru applying 8 scale ranks to the cities. Population estimates will be added in a final step by another contributor. Screenshots show quick plots of the GIS data. Color implies ranking.

California (below):

california

Alaska-Yukon (below):

alaska-yukon

Europe Biggest Cities (below):

europeless

Europe All Cities:

europemore

Beijing-Tokyo biggest cities (below):

beijing-tokyo

All Aboard For NACIS Sacramento in October!

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

sacramentoThe program for the 2009 NACIS annual conference has been announced. The location this year is Sacramento, Calif., from Wednesday, October 7th to Saturday the 10th. I will be presenting Natural Earth Vector with Tom Patterson and crew at the Practical Cartography Day event before the main conference.

The North American Cartographic Information Society, founded in 1980, is an organization comprised of specialists from private, academic, and government organizations whose common interest lies in facilitating communication in the map information community.

Opening session speaker will be Michal Migurski, Stamen Design in San Francisco. Michal is Partner and Director of Technology Stamen, and maintains an active blog about mapping and design. Several Saturday field trips are available.

See the nation’s most spectacular scenery on the way to this year’s NACIS conference. Join Dennis McClendon and the rolling Geodweeb party train as it heads from Chicago to Sacramento. More info is available via the CartoTalk forum posting.

trainmap

Using Live Paint to Build Polygons Out of Line Segments in Adobe Illustrator (Kelso)

Wednesday, August 5th, 2009

I remember spending hours in my introduction to computer cartography lab class at Humboldt State University “building polygons” in the Adobe Illustrator design software package. We started with state “lines” and, one by one, duplicated and joined them into polygons by painstakingly selecting matching endpoints and cursing the Illustrator error dialogs that kept coming up. Fast forward 5 software versions and 10 years and we can now accomplish the same workflow in seconds using the new “Live Paint” feature available in version CS2 and newer. Maybe this is old news, but it’s sure makes things easier on the Natural Earth Vector project!

Download native Illustrator CS3 file and follow along with sample linework.

Step 1: Start with lines for 1st order, country, and hydro coast, rivers on separate layers (like you’d normally layer your map file).

live_paint_step1

Step 2: Duplicate all related lines onto one “building” layer (the next step would group originals if you don’t do here).

live_paint_step2

Step 3: Select all those duplicated “building” lines (interior state boundaries, exterior country boundary, and exterior shorelines for that country, the more linework, the slower it goes), choose the live paint tool livepainticon and click on the selection. It will turn into a “live paint group”. If  you are viewing the bounding box, it will appear slightly differently than normal handles (see below).

live_paint_step3

Step 4: Make sure the toolbox fill is a color like yellow (the default is set to no fill, so you won’t get the tool to work unless you change it). Click and drag the live paint tool over all implied polygons between lines. Watch them turn into filled polys!!!! If you don’t get an implied polygon to fill, try adjusting the gap tolerance at Object > Live Paint > Gap Options. The default settings worked fine for me, though. Not shown here are the reddish thick highlight around target polygons as the Live Paint tool is dragged acros the artwork.

live_paint_step4

Step 5: Once you’re done and all your implied polygons are colored in like a coloring book, expand the live paint group (Object > Live Paint > Expand, or use the Expand button on the control panel button strip). Ungroup twice (Object > Ungroup). The polys, lines, and hydro will all be on the building layer. Use select by similar to select just the filled polys you just made and move them to the First_order_admin_polys layer. Delete the left over country and hydro lines (you have originals elsewhere).

live_paint_step5

Step 6: Color code new state polygons and compound path related admin units (none in this instance). That’s it!

live_paint_step6

Problems? Try this tutorial video from Layers magazine and, separately, from Mordy Golding.

PREVIEW Natural Earth Vector: First Order Admin Units

Monday, July 13th, 2009

We shipped off the 1:15,000,000 scale first-order administrative units for Natural Earth Vector to University of Wisconsin @ Madison to be attributed with country and province names and alpha-numeric codes last week. There are only 3,000+ of these around the world so this is no small task! Kudos go to Tom for doing the heavy lifting on this data theme. Props to Kevin and Ben @ UW-Madison for undertaking the attributing.

Some units are super tiny (see Slovenia in the Europe detail at bottom, almost equivalent in scale to municipalities in the USA). We ignore some small, mostly island nations (see the Caribbean image below) but will include a general admin_0 polygon for the entire country instead. First order administrative units are composed what most people call “provinces” and “states” (not to be confused with countries aka “states”). For some countries, we will also include 1st order admin “regions” that group smaller 1st order units into larger statistical areas (eg: the United Kingdom’s England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland).

If you have 10 to 20 hours to spare, we need your help to complete Natural Earth Vector. Please email me at nathaniel@kelsocartography.com to find out more.

admin_1_world

admin_1_africa

admin_1_asia_se1

admin_1_australasia1admin_1_central_america_caribbean1

admin_1_south_america1

admin_1_europe1

admin_1_europe_detail1

North Korea Issues Heated Warning to South (Wash Post)

Friday, July 10th, 2009

korea

[Editor's note: The Egypt-Sudan boundary post reminds me that North Korea says it will no longer respect the legal status of the five islands South Korea administers west of the South's mainland allocated during the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War. So many small details.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Blaine Harden. Wednesday, May 27, 2009

TOKYO, May 27 — North Korea announced Wednesday that it is no longer bound by the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War, the latest and most profound diplomatic aftershock from the country’s latest nuclear test two days earlier.

North Korea also warned that it would respond “with a powerful military strike” should its ships be stopped by international forces trying to stop the export of missiles and weapons of mass destruction.

The twin declarations, delivered by the country’s state news agency, followed South Korea’s announcement Tuesday that it would join the navies that will stop and inspect suspicious ships at sea. North Korea has repeatedly said that such participation would be a “declaration of war.”

They followed other developments in North Korea that have added to the sense of jangled nerves across northeast Asia since Monday’s underground nuclear test.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

“You take it – No, you take it”: the Bir Tawil Trapezoid (StrangeMaps)

Friday, July 10th, 2009

[Editor’s note: I’ve been researching sovereign state boundary disputes for Natural Earth Vector at the 1:15,000,000 and 1:50,000,000 scales so I read this entry at the StrangeMaps blog last week with some curiosity. Egypt effectively administers their portion of the “disputed” area along the Red Sea and seems to have dropped their claim to the Sudan portion south of the 22nd parallel. This boundary will be shown de facto along the 22nd parallel the Natural Earth Vector dataset. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from Strange Maps. June 28, 209.

bs18

The Bir Tawil Triangle is a desert of sand and rocks on the border between Egypt and the Sudan. It is also officially the most undesired territory in the world. Bir Tawil is the only piece of land on Earth (*) that is not claimed by any country – least of all by its neighbours. For either of them to claim the Bir Tawil Triangle would be to relinquish their claim to the Hala’ib Triangle. And while Hala’ib is also mainly rock and sand, it is not only ten times larger than Bir Tawil, but also adjacent to the Red Sea - so rather more interesting.

This bizarre situation started out with what is supposed to be the simplest of borders: a straight line. By the Condominium Treaty of 1899, the British drew the line between Egypt and what was then still known as the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan at the 22nd parallel north, resulting in a straight-line border of about 1,240 km (770 miles) from Libya to the Red Sea.

Continue reading at StrangeMaps . . .