Posts Tagged ‘nyt’

What’s Cooking on Thanksgiving (NY Times)

Friday, December 11th, 2009

[Editor's note: This series of small choropleth interactive maps from Matthew Ericson and Amanda Cox back on Thanksgiving day show regional patterns of what Americas are eating where. One holiday down, another to go. Thanks Kristin and Martin!]

Republished from the New York Times.

As cooks turn to the Web for Thanksgiving recipes, the terms they enter into search engines can provide clues to what dishes are being cooked around the nation. On Wednesday on Allrecipes.com, “sweet potato casserole” was by far the most common search term nationwide. It was tops in 36 of the 50 states and easily outpaced the No. 2 entry, “pumpkin pie.” |Related Article »


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A Remote Island Seeks a Boom Without a Bust (NY Times)

Thursday, December 10th, 2009

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[Editor's note: One of the more enjoyable aspects of working on Natural Earth was finding out about the far flung territories of countries. Australia's Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean near Indonesia is featured in this dispatch from the New York Times.]

Republished from the New York Times.
By NORIMITSU ONISHI. Christmas Island Journal. November 26, 2009

CHRISTMAS ISLAND, Australia — “The good times are back on Christmas Island,” said Trish O’Donnell, this island’s sole real estate agent. “Three-quarters of Australians probably didn’t know Christmas Island belonged to Australia, but now it’s a speculators’ market. All thanks to the I.D.C.”

That’s short for the Immigration Detention Center, a $370 million facility the Australian government opened less than a year ago to house the increasing number of asylum-seekers coming by boat to Australia. Tucked away in the jungle, at the other end of this island’s one inhabited corner, the center nevertheless has brought the whiff of quick, new money here.

The math was simple enough. Since the start of the year, the number of asylum-seekers has grown steadily, so that it now tops the population of local residents, around 1,100.

As immigration officials, guards, interpreters and others now fly in from mainland Australia for stretches of days or weeks, the island’s limited facilities are enjoying a boom. Hotels are booked weeks in advance. Rents have doubled. Lucky Ho’s and a handful of other restaurants turn away patrons without reservations.

Like many other islanders, Ms. O’Donnell, 53, was out to get her share of the new detention money, in her case by opening the Barracks, a restaurant and inn. “When do we get the opportunity to make good money on Christmas Island?” she said. “We usually just sell to each other.”

If there was urgency in her tone, it was because of the knowledge that busts have usually followed booms on Christmas Island.

Continue reading at New York Times . . .

Sarah Palin Map Illustration (NY Times)

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Saw this black and white illo with the Times opinion piece yesterday and thought it smartly done.]

Republished from the New York Times.

Online Maps: Everyman Offers New Directions (NY Times)

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

zooatlantabeforeatlantazooopenstreetmap[Editor's note: As my music prof was want to remind, the only difference between amateur and professional is one gets paid and the other doesn't. My hope is Google Maps starts offering user-generated geodata back to the community, like OpenStreetMap.org now does. Left image is before community edits, right is after. Thanks Nora!]

Republished from the New York Times.

SAN FRANCISCO — They don’t know it, but people who use Google’s online maps may be getting directions from Richard Hintz.

Mr. Hintz, a 62-year-old engineer who lives in Berkeley, Calif., has tweaked the locations of more than 200 business listings and points of interest in cities across the state, sliding an on-screen place marker down the block here, moving another one across the street there. Farther afield, he has mapped parts of Cambodia and Laos, where he likes to go on motorcycle trips.

Mr. Hintz said these acts of geo-volunteerism were motivated in part by self-interest: he wants to know where he’s going. But “it has this added attraction that it helps others,” he said.

Mr. Hintz is a foot soldier in an army of volunteer cartographers who are logging every detail of neighborhoods near and far into online atlases. From Petaluma to Peshawar, these amateurs are arming themselves with GPS devices and easy-to-use software to create digital maps where none were available before, or fixing mistakes and adding information to existing ones.

Like contributors to Wikipedia before them, they are democratizing a field that used to be the exclusive domain of professionals and specialists. And the information they gather is becoming increasingly valuable commercially.

Google, for example, sees maps playing a growing strategic role in its business, especially as people use cellphones to find places to visit, shop and eat. It needs reliable data about the locations of businesses and other destinations.

“The way you get that data is having users precisely locate things,” said John Hanke, a vice president of product management who oversees Google’s mapping efforts.

People have been contributing information to digital maps for some time, building displays of crime statistics or apartment rentals. Now they are creating and editing the underlying maps of streets, highways, rivers and coastlines.

“It is a huge shift,” said Michael F. Goodchild, a professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “This is putting mapping where it should be, which is the hands of local people who know an area well.”

That is changing the dynamics of an industry that has been dominated by a handful of digital mapping companies like Tele Atlas and Navteq.

Google is increasingly bypassing those traditional map providers. It has relied on volunteers to create digital maps of 140 countries, including India, Pakistan and the Philippines, that are more complete than many maps created professionally.

Last month Google dropped Tele Atlas data from its United States maps, choosing to rely instead on government data and other sources, including updates from users.

“They have coverage in areas that the big mapping guys don’t have,” said Mike Dobson, a mapping industry consultant who once worked at Rand McNally. “It has the opportunity to cause a lot of disruption in these industries.”

Continue reading at New York Times . . .

Why We Travel: Readers’ Photos (NY Times)

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

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[Editor's note: This interactive from the New York Times allows the user to filter a large set of user submitted vacation photos from around the world by country both by map and list interface. Topics like "beaches" and "road trip" focus in farther. Editor's Picks offers quick way to highlight the "best of". Filtering is a little slow on display of matched photos for me, but fun concept.]

Republished from the New York Times.

Browse hundreds of summer photos submitted by our readers, then start sharing your favorite photographs of Europe.

Credit: .

Interact with the original at New York Times . . .

Find Water Polluters Near You (NY Times)

Monday, September 14th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Slick interactive database & mashup from the New York Times highlights facilities around the United States that fail to meet basic environmental standards. Complementary choropleth map by state takes care of regional trends. Kudos to Derek W. et al.]

Republished from The New York Times. Sept. 13, 2009.

Across the nation, the system that Congress created to protect the nation’s waters under the Clean Water Act of 1972 today often fails to prevent pollution. The New York Times has compiled data on more than 200,000 facilities that have permits to discharge pollutants and collected responses from states regarding compliance. Information about facilities contained in this database comes from two sources: the Environmental Protection Agency and the California State Water Resources Control Board. The database does not contain information submitted by the states. Full Story »

Search the database & explore the map at the New York Times . . .

Scents and the City or “I -smell- NY” (NY Times)

Monday, August 31st, 2009

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[Editor's note: Jason Logan contributes to the resurgent field of experiential cartography by recounting his travel, by smell, across the isle of Manhattan. The semi-interactive map published in the New York Times brings to life "smell stops" in each neighborhood both as one would experience them in the daytime and at night. The piece reminds me of the 1985 historical novel Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, lent to me in university by Judy Walton. I recently posted on Edible Landscape Maps and John has a post on psychogeography maps.]

Republished from the New York Times. August 29, 2009
By JASON LOGAN, an illustrator and the author of “If We Ever Break Up, This Is My Book.” Produced by Jon Huang and Snigdha Koirala.

New York secretes its fullest range of smells in the summer; disgusting or enticing, delicate or overpowering, they are liberated by the heat. So one sweltering weekend, I set out to navigate the city by nose. As my nostrils led me from Manhattan’s northernmost end to its southern tip, some prosaic scents recurred (cigarette butts; suntan lotion; fried foods); some were singular and sublime (a delicate trail of flowers mingling with Indian curry around 34th Street); while others proved revoltingly unique (the garbage outside a nail salon). Some smells reminded me of other places, and some will forever remind me of New York.

Interact with the original at New York Times . . .

Name that Body of Water: East Sea or Sea of Japan?

Monday, August 17th, 2009

Last week an unnamed group (commentary elsewhere) ran this full page ad (below) in The Washington Post disagreeing with the use of Sea of Japan over East Sea for the body of water between the Korean peninsula and Japan. The series of ads has also appeared in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. The group also has informational pamphlets on several other contested issues.

In the US English, the conventional, Federal Board of Geographic Names toponymn for this body of water is “Sea of Japan”, and the conventional alternative name is also “East Sea” (Tong-hae romanized from Korean native script). When space is available, the placename is shown as “Sea of Japan (East Sea)”. As with any placename, alternatives are dropped under space constraints (such as with a 1 column map).

When the 8th Edition National Geographic Atlas of the World was published earlier this decade, a similar campaign (though more threatening) was run about the Persian Gulf (Arabian Gulf).

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Jackson’s Billboard Rankings Over Time (NY Times)

Wednesday, July 8th, 2009

[Editor's note: Like him or not, Michael Jackson had 30 years of sustained hits, comparing well statistically with other pop music legends as this interactive from the New York Times shows.]

Republished from the New York Times. June 25, 2009.

A timeline of how Michael Jackson’s songs performed on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

(Screenshot below) Interact with the original at New York Times . . .

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Matthew Bloch, Shan Carter, Jonathan Corum, Amanda Cox and Matthew Ericson/The New York Times

Mapping Foreclosures in the New York Region (NY Times)

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

[Editor's note: The interactive Google Maps mashup in Flash AS3 from the New  York times shows vector overlay of choropleth mapping by census tract and at the street level via dot distribution. As the user zooms in, the dots are revealed, as is a street map. At all levels the census tract summary statistics are available with a mouse over. Zooms are preset for some areas, and the user can type in their own address to zoom to that area. Multiple years add time dimension. Spatial brushing on the map is accomplished by outlining the geography's stroke, not changing the fill color. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the New York Times. May 15, 2009

A New York Times analysis found that foreclosure rates in the region were highest in areas with high minority populations. Zoom in to see foreclosures at the street level. Screenshot below.

Interact with the original at New York Times . . .

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