Posts Tagged ‘nyt’

Where 09: Matthew Ericson, “Red State, Blue State: Election Maps at The New York Times”

Friday, May 29th, 2009

More links and slides from the presentation at Ericson’s website . . .

The West Bank Archipelago (NY Times)

Tuesday, May 19th, 2009

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[Editor’s note: “Detail from an illustration in which a fanciful map illustrates the current fragmentation of the West Bank. Areas currently under the control of the Palestinian Authority are represented as islands, divided by areas under Israeli control, represented by the sea”. Image by Julien Bousac/Le Monde diplomatique. Thanks Kellee!]

Republished from the New York Times.
May 7, 2009, 8:02 am
By Robert Mackey

This week, leading Israeli, Palestinian and American officials have agreed that the creation of a Palestinian state on territory in the West Bank and Gaza is essential to peace in the Middle East. But spend any time looking at a map of the West Bank as it is today, or with any of the many different proposals for how that map might be redrawn to accommodate the aspirations of both Israelis and Palestinians, and it becomes clear why any sensible mapmaker might choose to steer well clear of the challenge of drawing up that state.

Continue reading at the New York Times . . .

The Death and Life of Great American Newspapers (The Nation)

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Somewhat depressing article from The Nation examines how many major cities across the US face the prospect of loosing their daily newspapers and what that could mean for journalism and democracy in America. Thanks Todd!]

Republished from The Nation.
by JOHN NICHOLS & ROBERT W. MCCHESNEY
March 18, 2009 (April 6, 2009 print edition)

RELATED: Former Washington Post executive editor Len Downie discusses the future of newspapers on CSPAN.

Communities across America are suffering through a crisis that could leave a dramatically diminished version of democracy in its wake. It is not the economic meltdown, although the crisis is related to the broader day of reckoning that appears to have arrived. The crisis of which we speak involves more than mere economics. Journalism is collapsing, and with it comes the most serious threat in our lifetimes to self-government and the rule of law as it has been understood here in the United States.

After years of neglecting signs of trouble, elite opinion-makers have begun in recent months to recognize that things have gone horribly awry. Journals ranging from TimeThe New YorkerThe Atlantic and The New Republic to the New York Times and theLos Angeles Times concur on the diagnosis: newspapers, as we have known them, are disintegrating and are possibly on the verge of extinction. Time‘s Walter Isaacson describes the situation as having “reached meltdown proportions” and concludes, “It is now possible to contemplate a time in the near future when major towns will no longer have a newspaper and when magazines and network news operations will employ no more than a handful of reporters.” A newspaper industry that still employs roughly 50,000 journalists–the vast majority of the remaining practitioners of the craft–is teetering on the brink.

Blame has been laid first and foremost on the Internet, for luring away advertisers and readers, and on the economic meltdown, which has demolished revenues and hammered debt-laden media firms. But for all the ink spilled addressing the dire circumstance of the ink-stained wretch, the understanding of what we can do about the crisis has been woefully inadequate. Unless we rethink alternatives and reforms, the media will continue to flail until journalism is all but extinguished.

Let’s begin with the crisis. In a nutshell, media corporations, after running journalism into the ground, have determined that news gathering and reporting are not profit-making propositions. So they’re jumping ship. The country’s great regional dailies–the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, theMinneapolis Star Tribune, the Philadelphia Inquirer–are in bankruptcy. Denver’s Rocky Mountain Newsrecently closed down, ending daily newspaper competition in that city. The owners of the San Francisco Chronicle, reportedly losing $1 million a week, are threatening to shutter the paper, leaving a major city without a major daily newspaper. Big dailies in Seattle (the Times), Chicago (the Sun-Times) and Newark (the Star-Ledger) are reportedly near the point of folding, and smaller dailies like the Baltimore Examiner have already closed. The 101-year-old Christian Science Monitor, in recent years an essential source of international news and analysis, is folding its daily print edition. The Seattle Post-Intelligenceris scuttling its print edition and downsizing from a news staff of 165 to about twenty for its online-only incarnation. Whole newspaper chains–such as Lee Enterprises, the owner of large and medium-size publications that for decades have defined debates in Montana, Iowa and Wisconsin–are struggling as the value of stock shares falls below the price of a single daily paper. And the New York Times needed an emergency injection of hundreds of millions of dollars by Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim in order to stay afloat.

Continue reading at The Nation . . .

Why Is Her Paycheck Smaller? (NY Times)

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive from the New York Times details the wage gab between male and female workers in different economic sectors. It starts out with an overview by occupation for 2008 and shows that while the gap has closed over time, it still exists. Users can see the specific gap by job by mousing over the data points. Occupation categories can be narrowed and include some limited narrative story telling annotating and explaining wage gaps for select professions. It would be nice to see this graphic in two views: absolute gap and normalized by experience (just as some maps are normalized by per capita), one of the identified factors the gap is now attributed to.]

Republished from The New York Times.
March 1, 2009. By Hannah Fairfield and Graham Roberts.

View the interactive version at NYTimes.
Screenshots below.

Nearly every occupation has the gap — the seemingly unbridgeable chasm between the size of the paycheck brought home by a woman and the larger one earned by a man doing the same job. Economists cite a few reasons: discrimination as well as personal choices within occupations are two major factors, and part of the gap can be attributed to men having more years of experience and logging more hours.

(below) Initial screen showing all categories.  Note mouseOver showing details for data point.

(below) Showing just Entertainment, education, and law jobs. Note callout for professors.

(below) Showing management, business and financial jobs. Note callout for chief executives.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Census Bureau

Interactive Map: Immigration Explorer (NY Times)

Thursday, March 12th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Part of their Remade in America series, this interactive map from the New York Times shows where select foreign-born groups have settled across the United States for the last 100 years. Find trends by ethnic group, zoom into individual states, query data values by county, and view historic data. Interactive leverages mapping toolset developed the last year at the Times for their impressive presidential election coverage. Thanks Geoff!]

Republished from The New York Times.
March 10, 2009. No credit given. 

Screenshots below. Interact with the Flash version at New York Times . . .

Related content: Times Topic |  Opinion blog | Diversity in the Classroom 

(below) All groups as percent of population (choropleth by area) 

(below) All groups as number of residents (graduated circles) 

(below) Default “All Countries” view can be changed to focus on a specific country of origin.  

 

(below) Focused on people born in China. 

Continue to interact with the Flash version at New York Times . . .

Sources: Social Explorer, www.socialexplorer.com; Minnesota Population Center; U.S. Census Bureau

SND New York City Meetup Presentations

Monday, March 9th, 2009

[Editor's note: I was up in New York city Saturday for a regional Society of News Designers meetup. The same presentations are now live on the SND website, which I've clipped below. Enjoy.]

Republished from Society of News Designers.
By Jon Wile — March 4, 2009

We were in New York City on Saturday for a free regional meetup. More than 100 people joined us in person and many more checked in online. The all-star lineup of speakers included graphics legend Nigel Holmes, Rolling Stone art director Joe Hutchinson, former Fortune graphics editor Sarah Slobin, and New York Times interactive graphics gurus Matthew Ericson and Shan Carter. We have presentations to share and we will put up the captured video footage next week if you did not see it live. Check it out.

Rolling Stone art director Joe Hutchinson speaks on Saturday at the meetup in New York. <a href=

Rolling Stone art director Joe Hutchinson speaks on Saturday at the meetup in New York. Photo by William Couch

PRESENTATIONS

Download Sarah Slobin’s (PDF: 29.5MB) presentation here.

Watch Joe Hutchinson’s presentation here.

Download the presentation (PDF: 26.6MB) from Matthew Ericson and Shan Carter here.

PHOTOS

ABOUT THESE MEETUPS

We had our first meetup in December in Washington: At that event, more than 60 visual journalists showed up to talk about our craft and get to know each other over drinks at The Hawk ‘n’ Dove, a classic Capitol Hill watering hole. It was a lot of fun.

Have an idea for a meetup in your town? Drop me an email and I can help you set it up.

The Geography of a Recession (NY Times)

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

[Editor’s note: This interactive Flash map from the New York Times allows the user to mouse over each of the 3,000 some county-level jurisdictions in the US and examine unemployment rates. Users can view all counties or limit the analysis to preset thematic filters. Thanks Mary Kate!]

Republished from the New York Times.
Interact with the original Flash version.

Job losses have been most severe in the areas that experienced a big boom in housing, those that depend on manufacturing and those that already had the highest unemployment rates. Related Article

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Ofheo; U.S.D.A.
Graphic by The New York Times

A Year of Parking Tickets (NY Times)

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

[Editor's note: This Google Maps mashup inside Flash shows color coded streets in New York City based on the number of parking violations. Preset zooms are provided to certain hot spots and but users can still auto-zoom to their own street addresses.]

Republished from the New York Times.
By Matthew Bloch and Amanda Cox.
Orig. pub. date: Nov. 26, 2008.

New York City agencies issued 9,955,441 parking tickets from July 2007 to June 2008.

Interact with the orignal Flash graphic at New York Times . . .

Tag Cloud: How Words Could End a War (NY Time)

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

[Editor's note: This op-editorial art piece (above) from the New York Times shows how a simple tag cloud can show an idea topology in a simple, powerful format. Full op-ed below.]

Republished from the New York Times.
By SCOTT ATRAN and JEREMY GINGES
Orig published: January 24, 2009

AS diplomats stitch together a cease-fire between Hamas and Israel, the most depressing feature of the conflict is the sense that future fighting is inevitable. Rational calculation suggests that neither side can win these wars. The thousands of lives and billions of dollars sacrificed in fighting demonstrate the advantages of peace and coexistence; yet still both sides opt to fight.

This small territory is the world’s great symbolic knot. “Palestine is the mother of all problems” is a common refrain among people we have interviewed across the Muslim world: from Middle Eastern leaders to fighters in the remote island jungles of Indonesia; from Islamist senators in Pakistan to volunteers for martyrdom on the move from Morocco to Iraq.

Some analysts see this as a testament to the essentially religious nature of the conflict. But research we recently undertook suggests a way to go beyond that. For there is a moral logic to seemingly intractable religious and cultural disputes. These conflicts cannot be reduced to secular calculations of interest but must be dealt with on their own terms, a logic very different from the marketplace or realpolitik.

Across the world, people believe that devotion to sacred or core values that incorporate moral beliefs — like the welfare of family and country, or commitment to religion and honor — are, or ought to be, absolute and inviolable. Our studies, carried out with the support of the National Science Foundation and the Defense Department, suggest that people will reject material compensation for dropping their commitment to sacred values and will defend those values regardless of the costs.

In our research, we surveyed nearly 4,000 Palestinians and Israelis from 2004 to 2008, questioning citizens across the political spectrum including refugees, supporters of Hamas and Israeli settlers in the West Bank. We asked them to react to hypothetical but realistic compromises in which their side would be required to give away something it valued in return for a lasting peace.

All those surveyed responded to the same set of deals. First they would be given a straight-up offer in which each side would make difficult concessions in exchange for peace; next they were given a scenario in which their side was granted an additional material incentive; and last came a proposal in which the other side agreed to a symbolic sacrifice of one of its sacred values.

Continue reading at New York Times . . .

Tag Cloud: Twitter Chatter During the Super Bowl (NY Times)

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

[Editor’s note: The Times produced a fantastic interactive time-based tag-cloud-on-a-map showing twitter chatter across the US keyed to major events in the Super Bowl game between the Steelers and Cardinals. Several thematic channels are available. Kudos to Matthew Bloch and Shan Carter. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from The New York Times.
Orig pub date: Feb. 2, 2009.

As the Steelers and Cardinals battled on the field, Twitter users across the nation pecked out a steady stream of “tweets.” The map shows the location and frequency of commonly used words in Super Bowl related messages.

Interact with the original Flash version at New York Times . . .