Posts Tagged ‘obama’

INTERACTIVE: Inside Obama’s West Wing (Kelso via Wash Post)

Friday, January 30th, 2009

[Editor's note: Please enjoy this interactive featuring a floor plan of the West Wing showing who sits where. Kudos to Laura Stanton and Karen Yourish for leading this project. I advised on the coding.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
Original published 29 January 2009.

They say that proximity to power is power. And it comes to follow that the most coveted offices in Washington are those in the West Wing of the White House. Some, like press secretary Robert Gibbs’s office, are spacious. Others are cubbyholes. But they are all in the same building as the president’s Oval Office. Explore the interactive graphic below for an insider’s guide to who’s sitting where in President Obama’s West Wing:

Screenshots below. View interactive version.

GRAPHIC: By Laura Stanton, Nathaniel V. Kelso, Philip Rucker, Al Kamen and Karen Yourish – The Washington Post

Picturing the Inauguration: The Readers’ Album (NY Times)

Monday, January 26th, 2009

[Editor's note: Several hundred readers at the New York Times site submitted photos to a live photo wall commemorating last Tuesday's historic inauguration of Barack Obama as the United State's 44th president.]

Republished from The New York Times. January 18, 2009. Reader submitted.

NYTimes.com readers sent in their photographs from Washington and around the world. Images are organized in the order they were received.

Screenshots below. View interactive version.

Jon Huang, Ben Koski, Andrew Kueneman, Thomas Lin, Gabriel Dance, Whitney Dangerfield Elisabeth Goodridge, John McGrath, Jacob Harris, Tyson Evans, Alan McLean, and Hamilton Boardman/The New York Times

Faces in the Crowd (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, January 26th, 2009

[Editor's note: This in an interactive version of an annotated photo in the print edition. I did a little programming, Christina, Karen, and Patterson did the heavy lifting. The version below shows all the faces but the user starts off with the original image to explore.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Tuesday Jan. 20, 2009.

Roll over the photo to see who was at the Capitol when Barack Obama was sworn in as the 44th president of the United States:

Screenshot below. View original interactive.

By Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, Cristina Rivero, Patterson Clark and Karen Yourish – The Washington Post.

The Nation Barack Obama Inherits (Atlantic)

Friday, January 23rd, 2009

[Editor’s note: Compare the state of the nation via an oddball set of statistics for when Bush took office and and Obama now in 2009. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the Atlantic, January / February 2009.

By Timothy Lavin. Timothy Lavin is an Atlantic associate editor.

Then and Now. On March 4, 1933, Franklin Roosevelt addressed a crowd of 400,000 at his first inauguration. The past few years had seen a spectacular decline in the nation’s fortunes, born of what he called the “mad chase of evanescent profits.” Banks were failing, savings disappearing, real estate and commodities collapsing. Fascism was rising abroad. In response, Roosevelt pledged “a disciplined attack upon our common problems.” He didn’t get much more specific than that. And, really, he didn’t have to. The people wanted change, in the current vernacular—or, more precisely, they wanted a government that could respond coherently to the profound changes that were already under way.

Barack Obama assumes the presidency this year amid a similar sense of national crisis, and having made similar promises of change. And, like Roosevelt, he’ll be leading a country very different from the one his predecessor inherited: as the statistics on this map show, change itself is one thing we’ve seen in abundance in the past eight years. Making sense of that upheaval will be the first responsibility of the new administration.

Since 2000, America has changed in small ways, in big ways, and in ways that seem innocent enough now but no doubt herald some radical disruptions to come. Many more people are poor, uninsured, and in prison. Many more are billionaires. The burden of health-care costs has grown heavier, and so have we. We charge more, save less, and play a lot more video games. Even the things that haven’t changed much—like the amount of oil we consume, or the price of cocaine, or the size of our military—reflect not so much stasis as unsustainable trajectories. For Obama, responding to these problems will require breaking deep national addictions—to oil, to etherealized finance, to profligacy of all kinds—and, somehow, easing the tremens along the way. Perhaps, in doing so, he should heed a warning Roosevelt issued on the campaign trail: “Without leadership alert and sensitive to change,” he said, “we are bogged up or lose our way.”

Click image above to view larger version of the map.

Click here to see the sources from which this map was compiled.

Map: Walking to the Inauguration (Wash Post)

Sunday, January 11th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Continuing coverage of Obama inauguration on January 20th, 2009. Unprecedented crowds are expected, severely disrupting commuting patterns. If you are within two miles of the National Mall experts say to walk to your destination (and expect security checkpoints around the Mall itself). Other coverage includes: overview map, ticketed seating, special bus corridors, and road closures and parking restrictions.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

The bad news: Witnessing this historic occasion in person will require a bit of a schlep. The good news: Officials say pedestrians will be allowed to go just about everywhere. So what about those who have to park their cars and venture over the Potomac and Anacostia rivers on foot for the first time? Put on your sturdy shoes, grab a wind-resistant jacket and climb down into this guide to walking over the 10 bridges into the District of Columbia. — Reporting by Bonnie Berkowitz

SOURCES: U.S. Secret Service, Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, D.C. Department of Transportation

NOTE: Closures and corridors are subject to change at the discretion of security officials.

Graphic By Laris Karklis — The Washington Post

Map: Inauguration Road Closures, Bridge Closures, Parking Restrictions, Tour Bus Parking (Wash Post)

Sunday, January 11th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Continuing coverage of Obama inauguration on January 20th, 2009. Unprecedented crowds are expected, severely disrupting commuting patterns. If you are within two miles of the National Mall experts say to walk to your destination (and expect security checkpoints around the Mall itself). Other coverage includes: overview map, ticketed seating, and special bus corridors.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
Original post on Jan. 7th, 2009.

Map: Inauguration Special Bus Corridors (Wash Post)

Sunday, January 11th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Continuing coverage of how to best experience or cope with the Inauguration of Barack Obama as 44th President of the United States on January 20th. Other posts include: Overview map and Ticketed seating.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Jan. 9, 2009.

Metro has designated 23 special bus corridors to run extended rush-hour service from 4 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Jan. 20. Corridor service mainly follows existing Metrobus routes and bus stops across the region. The buses on these corridors pick up and terminate at 14 stops just outside the restricted area. They will run about every 10 minutes to accommodate inauguration crowds.

MAP: Obama Inauguration Ticket Holder Access (Wash Post)

Sunday, January 11th, 2009

[Editor's note: This graphic in today's Washington Post shows those lucky few with an inauguration ticket how to get to their seat in front of the U.S. Capitol Building next Tuesday. Tickets are required for the swearing-in ceremony at the Capitol. Entrance will be granted only at the screening gate indicated by the color-coded ticket. Map shows Screening Point (Metro Access ); Ticket Gate; and Entry Routes.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
Sunday, Jan. 11, 2009. Related blog post here.

I have a related post on the parade route, general seating, and vendors.

Only 240,000 people will have access to the ticketed and seating areas closest to the Capitol to watch the inauguration ceremony. Here’s a look at the ticket design and where ticket holders should go Jan. 20, 2009.

Click image for larger view.

You Should Know:

Orange, Blue and Silver Ticket Holders

Ticket holders in any of the south sections (orange and blue) or the Mall standing areas (silver) should enter through gates on the south side of the Capitol grounds. Due to the closures of Pennsylvania Avenue for the parade, those coming from the north can access the south side of the Capitol grounds in one of several ways:

From the east or northeast: Go around the Capitol to the east using 2nd Street NE/SE (or streets farther east) to reach C Street SE and walk west to the blue, orange or silver gates.

From the north or northwest: Use the 3rd Street tunnel, entrance at 3rd and D streets NW near the Labor Department,  to cross under Pennsylvania Avenue and the Mall. One side of the tunnel will be closed for pedestrian use. This is the only way to cross the Mall near the Capitol.

If you have a Silver ticket, because of changes since tickets were printed, the only access point is at Independence Avenue and 3rd Street SW.

Yellow and Purple Tickets
Ticket holders in the north sections (yellow and purple tickets) should enter on the north side of the Capitol grounds. Guests must follow routes that do not require crossing Pennsylvania Avenue.

From the south or southwest: Use the 3rd Street tunnel to cross under the Mall and Pennsylvania Avenue. One side of the tunnel will be closed for pedestrian use; this is the only way to cross the Mall near the Capitol. Or, walk around the Capitol to the east using 2nd Street SE/NE (or streets farther east) to reach the north side of the Capitol grounds.

Metro riders should be aware that trains might not be able to stop at stations that are deemed to be overcrowded for safety reasons. If this happens, get off at the next possible stop and walk back toward your designated station.

*In case of overcrowding, alternative stops include L’Enfant Plaza to the west and Eastern Market to the east.

SOURCE: Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies

BY APRIL UMMINGER AND  MARY KATE CANNISTRA — THE WASHINGTON POST

Map: The Inauguration of Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States (Wash Post)

Tuesday, January 6th, 2009

[Editor’s note: If you’re planning on being in DC for the Inauguration of Barack Obama this month, grab this free map of the festivities from The Washington Post made by Gene Thorp. The map is updated regularly with the latest information.]

Republished from The Washington Post. (Updated map on 11 Jan. 2009.)

The inauguration of President Barack Obama on Jan. 20, 2009, is expected to be one of the largest public gatherings ever to take place in Washington, D.C. Millions are expected to visit the National Mall and other nearby points to view the ceremony either in person or via telescreens, watch the parade from the U.S. Capitol to the White House, and more. On this 2009 inauguration map, The Post will detail information visitors can use to plan their trips downtown. It will be updated periodically as more information becomes available. (A downloadable version is also available in PDF format.)

INTERACTIVE: Obama’s Cabinet Picks (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, December 22nd, 2008

[Editor's note: I created this interactive with Karen Yourish and Laura Stanton for the Dec. 21 edition of the Washington Post. President-elect Barack Obama completed his Cabinet picks just 7 weeks after his election on November 4th, 2008. Explore who he's picked for twenty government agency compare to previous administrations. The little human shapes on the timeline are interactive, as well as the Obama cabinet photo collage, and the week tabs.]

Republished from Washington Post.

NOTE: Barack Obama won the Nov. 4, 2008, election’s popular vote. He will be inaugurated as the 44th president on Jan. 20. As both of these days fall on a Tuesday, “weeks” are calculated as Wednesday through Tuesday.

NOTE: Some agency positions have two nominees per president if the first nominee rescinded his name and another was nominated in his place.

SOURCE: Staff Reports | GRAPHIC: Karen Yourish, Laura Stanton and Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, The Washington Post.

First posted: 20 December 2008. Last updated: 21 December 2008.