Posts Tagged ‘processing’

Visualizing Urban Transportation II: Pays de la Loire (Xiaoji’s Design Weblog)

Friday, June 4th, 2010

[Editor's note: Nifty spatial data visualizations with bi-variate mapping by mode share and frequency. Nice shout out to Illustrator for final design work.]

Republished from Xiaoji’s Design Weblog.

Some more images from my project in the SENSEable City workshop.

Usage of public transportation v.s. population: Green dot sizes show online queries per unit population; Pink dot sizes show the scale of population. All queries sent through SNCF website www.destineo.fr, from Pays de la Loire, March 1 through March 31,2010. We can see different dependency on public transportation in each region.

The connection from Nantes to other cities of France: width of lines shows frequency of travels; transparency shows the proportion of such connection in all transportations carried by that city. All queries are sent from Nantes through the SNCF website www.destineo.fr, March 1 2010. Click to see complete graph.

Tools used: Processing, Illustrator

Flash AS3 versus HTML 5+ (Mike @ Teczno)

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

canvasmappingtag[Editor's note: Even with Adobe's open sourcing the Flash ActionScript 3.0 compiler, the HTML community continues to push for abandoning the platform in favor newer markup languages that center around the canvas tags. Slowly this is becoming more of a reality as the markup becomes more powerful and the rendering engines faster. We're still not their yet, and I'll be programming in AS3 for a while more yet. But something to ponder.]

Republished from Teczno.

the future is staring us in the face

That’s the line we use around the office whenever the subject of HTML and canvas comes up – we use Adobe Flash for most everything now, but we don’t expect that situation to last forever. The work done by Mozilla on Gecko and Apple on WebKit is one possible future for online design and visualization, and it’s turning slowly to face us right about now.

A few developments during recent years have brought us here.

One of the first widespread demonstrations of canvas viability as an interactive medium came from legendary Javascript developer John Resig, who ported the popular educational / artistic Processing environment to Javascript and released Processing.js to the world in May 2008 or so, just about 1 1/2 years ago. At the time, the library was lauded as an “amazing hack” (Andy Baio). Christopher Blizzard said:

The web is going to win, filling the market niche where Flash and other similar technologies found their hold. And John’s little project can hopefully act as a great catalyst to take us there. Thanks, John!

Continue reading at Teczno and play with live mapping demo . . .

How to Make a US County Thematic Map Using Free Tools (FlowingData)

Friday, November 20th, 2009

[Editor's note: If you don't have an expensive GIS license but still want to make pretty maps, Flowing Data has a tutorial to get you started. They even use ColorBrewer when setting up the data classes!]

Republished from Flowing Data.
Posted by Nathan / Nov 12, 2009.

There are about a million ways to make a choropleth map. You know, the maps that color regions by some metric. The problem is that a lot of solutions require expensive software or have a high learning curve…or both. What if you just want a simple map without all the GIS stuff? In this post, I’ll show you how to make a county-specific choropleth map using only free tools.

The Result

Here’s what we’re after. It’s the most recent unemployment map from last week.

Unemployment in the United States

Step 0. System requirements

Just as a heads up, you’ll need Python installed on your computer. Python comes pre-installed on the Mac. I’m not sure about Windows. If you’re on Linux, well, I’m sure you’re a big enough nerd to already be fluent in Python.

We’re going to make good use of the Python library Beautiful Soup, so you’ll need that too. It’s a super easy, super useful HTML/XML parser that you should come to know and love.

Continue reading at Flowing Data . . .

Flickr Geotagged Photos as Cartogram Map

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

flickerdistribution

[Editor's note: As more cameras and users tag their photos on upload into the Flickr pool, we can visualize where users are contributing via the above cartogram and below as 3d globe map. The cartogram source isn't attributed, but I like how it breaks out high and medium contribution areas in blue and pink, and then shows largly unpopulated areas (but still popular to photograph in the Amazon's case) in green, and then ocean areas in grey. Or thats my take on it ;) Thanks Lynda!]

Republished from Flickr user Straup and RevDanCatt.

Play movie at original site, screenshot below.

flickrprocessing
So, here it is, 24 hours worth of geotagged photos (64,410) from last Monday, March 23rd. Our numbers say that around 30% are normally private, giving us a total of around 92,000 geotagged photos for that day, which is just over 1 photo geotagged per second.

All the data was pulled down (using Processing, of all things) via the API, and probably took around 12 minutes (when it’s behaving itself) as I was being a) gentle with the servers b) was getting it as JSON which takes a while for Processing to parse each page (more information here: blog.blprnt.com/blog/blprnt/processing-json-the-new-york-…. And then written to a flat file.

Continue reading and view video at Flickr . . .

Frame That Spam! Data-Crunching Artists Transform the World of Information (Wired)

Monday, March 10th, 2008

wired logoTim McKeough posted an interactive piece on the Feb 29th edition of Wired magazine showcasing artists who muse on new media (from his intro):

Blog posts, traffic patterns, government reports, digital video, email—a new crop of data-crunching artists are using data in much the same way Picasso applied paint to transform the world of information into mesmerizing abstractions.

Their tools are programs like Processing, an open-source electronic sketchbook (flickr pool), and VVVV, which can merge audio, video, and 3-D models (flicker pool).

The results are sweet, but they’re not just eye candy: They deliver a fresh perspective on the digital detritus we hums shed–or acquire–as we inhabit the virtual world.

Read more at Wired.com…

You might find some cool desktop pictures in the flickr pools linked above. Here are a couple to get you started: Image 1. Image 2. Image 3. Image 4. Thanks Laris.

Image below: Jason Salavon for the US Census Bureau, “US Population by County, 1790-2000″

jason salavon census