Posts Tagged ‘psychogeography’

New Flickr shapefile public dataset 2.0 (find the esri type .shp here)

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

2971287541_27e6a06a21

An updated version of the Flickr shapefile public dataset (2.0) was released last week. From nils official post:

… We haven’t completely forgotten about shapefiles and have finally gotten around to generating a new batch (read about Alpha Shapes to find out how it’s done). When Aaron did the first run we had somewhere around ninety million (90M) geotagged photos. Today we have over one hundred and ninety million (190M) and that number is growing rapidly. Of course lots of those will fall within the boundaries of the existing shapes and won’t give us any new information, but some of them will improve the boundaries of old shapes, and others will help create new shapes where there weren’t any before. Version 1 of the dataset had shapes for around one hundred and eighty thousand (180K) WOE IDs, and now we have shapes for roughly two hundred and seventy thousand (270K) WOE IDs. Woo. The dataset is available for download today, available for use under the Creative Commons Zero Waiver.

True to it’s claim, the version 2.0 release brings added fidelity on existing shapes (they are becoming more conformal to the features’ true geographic shape as more human sensors perambulate) and surveys some more cities and significantly more neighborhoods. From a data analytics perspective, I wish the new version had the summary photo count and centroid XY per feature of the 1.0 version. But very excited to see a new version released! Image above by Aaron Straup CopeMore coverage of things Flickr on Kelso’s Corner »

While the dataset is distributed in GeoJSON format, that isn’t accessible to everyone so I’ve mirrored an ESRI Shapefile version of the Flickr Shapefile Public Dataset 2.0 with this blog post (~60 mb). Details on how I did the conversion after the jump.

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One mulberry, and they’re carried home (Wash Post)

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

mulberries

[Editor's note: Food geography mixed with migration and sense of place = psychogeography!]

Republished from The Washington Post.

In Washington, mulberry trees offer many immigrants a taste of home
By Tara Bahrampour

The rush-hour rainstorm didn’t faze Sara Shokravi as she parked in Rosslyn, ducked into a Starbucks restroom to change out of her work clothes and marched down to a narrow offramp that feeds motorists onto the Key Bridge. Ignoring the cars that splashed water onto the grass, Shokravi, a 27-year-old consultant, pulled out a plastic bag, stopped at a tree laden with red and black berries, and started picking.

It would not have been a strange sight in her native Iran, where at this time of year entire families can be seen at laying out bedsheets and shaking trees to collect the berries, which they eat fresh, dried or blended into juice. Here, she acknowledged, her foraging prompts “funny looks. This is D.C. — people aren’t going to go out of their way to get something if it’s not in a store.”

They don’t know what they’re missing, say mulberry fans, most of whom are immigrants. Just the sight of fruit-laden trees can conjure up sweet memories for people who grew up in the Middle East, Central Asia, the Caucasus and the Far East.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Scents and the City or “I -smell- NY” (NY Times)

Monday, August 31st, 2009

nytsmellmap

[Editor's note: Jason Logan contributes to the resurgent field of experiential cartography by recounting his travel, by smell, across the isle of Manhattan. The semi-interactive map published in the New York Times brings to life "smell stops" in each neighborhood both as one would experience them in the daytime and at night. The piece reminds me of the 1985 historical novel Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, lent to me in university by Judy Walton. I recently posted on Edible Landscape Maps and John has a post on psychogeography maps.]

Republished from the New York Times. August 29, 2009
By JASON LOGAN, an illustrator and the author of “If We Ever Break Up, This Is My Book.” Produced by Jon Huang and Snigdha Koirala.

New York secretes its fullest range of smells in the summer; disgusting or enticing, delicate or overpowering, they are liberated by the heat. So one sweltering weekend, I set out to navigate the city by nose. As my nostrils led me from Manhattan’s northernmost end to its southern tip, some prosaic scents recurred (cigarette butts; suntan lotion; fried foods); some were singular and sublime (a delicate trail of flowers mingling with Indian curry around 34th Street); while others proved revoltingly unique (the garbage outside a nail salon). Some smells reminded me of other places, and some will forever remind me of New York.

Interact with the original at New York Times . . .