Posts Tagged ‘ria’

TRAINING: Building Rich Internet Applications with ArcGIS API for Flex (ESRI)

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Take advantage of free training from GIS-leader ESRI. Thanks Mary Kate!]

Republished from ESRI.

When: Thursday, January 29, 2009
Three broadcast noted in three local time zones

  • 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., or 3:00 p.m. (PST)
  • Noon, 2:00 p.m., or 6:00 p.m. (EST)
  • 5:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m., or 11:00 p.m. (UTC/GMT)

Do you want to use the new ArcGIS API for Flex to build fast and visually rich Web mapping applications? We will show you how during Building Rich Internet Applications with ArcGIS API for Flex, the next ESRI live training seminar. You will learn the concepts of rich Internet applications (RIAs) and what tools are needed to start building Web mapping applications with ArcGIS API for Flex that you can deploy on the Internet or to the desktop.

During the seminar, you also will learn about:

  • The capabilities of the Adobe Flex framework and the ArcGIS API for Flex features and functionality
  • How to use existing Flex components with ArcGIS API for Flex
  • What to consider when authoring and deploying applications in a Web server
  • Other educational resources available about Flex applications and how to obtain the information

Viewing the Seminar

A broadband Internet connection and an ESRI Global Account (free) are needed to watch the seminar. An ESRI Global Account is complimentary and only takes a few minutes to create. A few weeks after the live presentation, a recorded version of the seminar will be archived and available for viewing.

For more information, visit ESRI Training and Education.

Google Now Indexes Flash Content

Sunday, July 20th, 2008

flash happyAdobe announced earlier this month that they have teamed up with Google and Yahoo! to enhance search engine indexing of the Flash file format (SWF). The newly published SWF specifications allow the search engines to better capture rich internet application’s changing states where much of the Flash file’s content is revealed as the user interacts with the file, not just the opening screen. Google has already rolled out this feature, Yahoo! will be soon. (Graphic from ArsTechnica. Thanks Gene and Laris!)

From the Adobe press release:

 “Designers and Web developers have long been frustrated that search engines couldn’t better access the information within their content created with Flash technology. It’s great to see Adobe and the search engines working directly together to improve the situation,” said Danny Sullivan, editor-in-chief, SearchEngineLand.com. “The changes should help unlock information that’s previously been ‘invisible’ and will likely result in a better experience for searchers.” 

Read Google’s official blog entry on this new feature.

Now that we’ve launched our Flash indexing algorithm, web designers can expect improved visibility of their published Flash content, and you can expect to see better search results and snippets. There’s more info on the Webmaster Central blog  about the Searchable SWF integration.  

 ArsTechnica has a good read on this announcement as well:

 As anyone who has had the pleasure of doing web design and development through marketing agencies knows, Flash tends to be wildly popular among clients and wildly unpopular among, well, pretty much everyone else. Part of the reason for this is because Flash is so inherently un-Googleable; anything that goes into a Flash-only site is basically invisible to search engines and therefore, the world. That will no longer be the case, however, as Adobe announced today that it has teamed up with Google and Yahoo to make Flash files indexable by search engines 

Google says it’s able to do this by developing an algorithm that “explores Flash files in the same way that a person would,” by clicking buttons and manually going through Flash content. “Our algorithm remembers all of the text that it encounters along the way, and that content is then available to be indexed,” wrote the company. “We can’t tell you all of the proprietary details, but we can tell you that the algorithm’s effectiveness was improved by utilizing Adobe’s new Searchable SWF library.”

Of course, Google (and eventually Yahoo) won’t be able to index everything embedded within a Flash file—at least not yet. Anything that is image-related, including text that is embedded into images, will be invisible to the search engines for the time being. Google also noted that it can’t execute certain JavaScripts that may be embedded into a Flash file, and that while it indexes content that is contained in a separate HTML or XML file, it won’t be counted as part of the content in the Flash file. These are all issues that are being worked on, however, and are likely to change in the future.

New York Times published something on this, too.

Apple’s open secret: SproutCore is Cocoa for the Web

Monday, June 16th, 2008

sprout core logo 2All this talk of Rich Internet Applications and choosing if one should use Flash, Silverlight, or some Googley “open source” solution can leave the head spinning. Most often it is best just to get the job done with the tools and skill set at hand. But what does the future hold?

Several clues are at hand, revealed at last week’s Apple developers conference in San Francisco.

Safari is about to get much faster at running javascript, the web programming language that powers many neat Web 2.0 style sites. Other browsers are getting faster, too. Why? Because this is the slowdown bottleneck in the Web 2.0 environment. (Example speed increase here.)

Apple has been contributing heavily to the open-source SproutCore javascript frameworks and they form the basis of much of the new MobileMe service that replaces dot.mac. This is their push factor. Almost all vestiges of Flash have been removed from Apple.com and replaced with “standards” focused elements that are just as spiffy.

Why SproutCore? It is being used to deploy Apple’s own Cocoa programming frameworks from the Mac (that’s what gives the Mac it’s look-and-feel) onto the web as open standards that will enable “desktop” like applications (in their look and power) to run in your web browser. And on your Windows PC, to boot. Talk about an end-game run around!

From RoughlyDrafted.com (source):

SproutCore not only makes it easy to build real applications for the web using menus, toolbars, drag and drop support, and foreign language localization, but it also provides a full Model View Controller application stack like Rails (and Cocoa), with bindings, key value observing, and view controls. It also exposes the latent features of JavaScript, including late binding, closures, and lambda functions. Developers will also appreciate tools for code documentation generation, fixtures, and unit testing.

A key component of its clean MVC philosophy that roots SproutCore into Cocoa goodness is bindings, which allows developers to write JavaScript that automatically runs any time a property value changes. With bindings, very complex applications with highly consistent behavior can be created with very little “glue” code.

Read more on this topic at AppleInsider.com and RoughlyDrafted.com.