Posts Tagged ‘san francisco’

Betashapes for San Francisco neighborhoods

Sunday, August 21st, 2011

[Editor's note: A first for me, read this post in Romanian/Ukrainian cyrillic. Thanks Maria!]

First results in using the betashapes script from Schuyler Erle and Melissa Santos. Still some kinks for me to work out relating understanding how the script deals with donut holes and scrubbing the list of Yahoo GeoPlanet neighborhood names in the input. For the US, can just use Census block polygons and avoid OSM copyright funk. Use GeoPDFs on the iPhone and other iOS devices to see yourself in the map, get Avenza’s PDF Maps.app. More images after the jump. Click on an image to see it larger.

More background: Betashapes are based on how people tag (and only if they also geotag) their Flickr photos. The script queries Flickr for photos for specified neighborhood tags (up to 2,500 sample size each ‘hood, these SF neighborhoods calculated from ~250,000 photo locations) and counts up what neighborhood tag is dominant in any city block and then aggregates them into neighborhoods. The neighborhood names and ids are from the Yahoo! GeoPlanet database that has a mix of real and fanciful (minority report) places. If you remove the ones you don’t agree with from the input, they will be ignored on the output. Lots to refine here…

View GeoPDF »
Download betashapes shapefile for SF »
Download SF geodata ingredients »
Download Y! GeoPlanet SF files »

(below) Betashapes using Flickr images and city street grid turned into polygon blocks.
sf_neighborhoods_betashapes

(more…)

New City Landscapes – Interactive Tweetography Maps (UrbanTick)

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

screen-shot-2010-06-30-at-13502-am

[Editor's note: Series of maps showing twitter tweet density in New York, London, Paris and Munich (some but not all tweets are tagged with geographic coordinates) with hypsometric tints, contours, and placenames (with some literary license). A little more refined than those San Francisco crime maps floating around earlier this month. Thanks Andy!]

Republished from @UrbanTick

Over the past few months we have been harvesting geospatial data from Twitter with the aim of creating a series of new city maps based on Twitter data. Via a radius of 30km around New York, London, Paris, Munich we have collated the number of Tweets and created our New City Landscape Maps.

Continue reading at UrbanTick . . .

Map album art covers from Left of the Dial: Dispatches from the ’80s Underground box set

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

fe3c6230a8a013bd63f9f010lSaw these at a friend’s birthday party last weekend. Fanciful geographies from a collage of old school print maps form the covers of the 4 CDs in the Left of the Dial box set. The first shows San Francisco, California, on the left and Boston, Mass., on the right with Manchester, UK, at top with a London inset.

21c1828fd7a01836a9c30110l

375e828fd7a07836a9c30110l

d004828fd7a03836a9c30110l

a400828fd7a05836a9c30110l

Preview of Natural Earth version 1.2 populated places

Tuesday, May 4th, 2010

Version 1.1 brought Natural Earth up to ~7,000 populated places (purple hollow circle icons with labels). Version 1.2 will increase that by 25 times to about 175,000 populated places. It will be available as a supplement to the 1.1 version selection. What does this get you? A 1:1 million scale map of cities around the world and a 1:250,000 scale map of the United States and other select countries. There’s still basic selection work to be accomplished (Santiago Chile has duplicate points now, as does London) and scale ranks need refining (boosting blue 10 million, 5 million and 2 million selections from the 1:1 million black dots on these preview maps).

Because the world’s geo infrastructure sucks, not all the new features will have population counts in the 1.2 version. But most should have areal extent bounds and nesting to indicate if the town is part of a larger metro area. At the 1:250,000 scale (gmaps zoom 11), we start to see actual incorporated towns and unincorporated suburbs, but at the 1:1m scale we’re still dealing primarily in metropolitan and micropolitan features (urban areas that host multiple “cities”).

The names of the feature will also need work, but that will occur after the 1.2 release (India, China, and Central Asia mostly). The version 1.1 locations will be shifted over to use the more accurate geoNames lngLats for about 6,000 features (note Oakland below). Locations were fine at 1:10,000,000 scale but don’t always hold up on zoom in. A later update will incorporate an additional 100,000 places to flesh out the 1:1m scale and maybe a few extra for closer in. Combine these populated places with roads and they start looking like atlas plates :)

More preview images after the jump.

sfbayarea

haiti

iraq

More preview maps after the jump.

(more…)

Where 2.0 next week

Friday, March 26th, 2010

I’m in San Francisco (SJ) next week for the Where 2.0 conference. Ping me if you’d like to meet in an analog forum. Posts will be sporadic.

Edgar Wayburn, 103, dies; No. 1 protector of U.S. wilderness (Wash Post)

Monday, March 22nd, 2010

ph2010030805249

[Editor's note: We continue to expand Natural Earth coverage this week by adding U.S. National Parks. Do you have a few hours to spare? We'd like to add National Forests, large state parks, and wilderness areas.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Emma Brown. Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Edgar Wayburn, 103, a physician and five-time Sierra Club president who is credited with protecting more wilderness and parkland than any other American citizen, died March 5 at his home in San Francisco. No cause of death was reported.

As a volunteer conservationist for more than 50 years, he was a behind-the-scenes force for wilderness protection who never earned the widespread renown of contemporaries such as the outspoken environmental activist David Brower and photographer Ansel Adams. Dr. Wayburn maintained a full-time medical practice, working evenings and weekends to stave off post-World War II development in California’s coastal hills and later to protect millions of acres in Alaska.

“Edgar Wayburn has helped to preserve the most breathtaking examples of the American landscape,” President Bill Clinton said in 1999, when he presented Dr. Wayburn with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

The Map as Art: Contemporary Artist Explore Cartographically (Katharine Harmon)

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

[Editor's note: I picked up this fascinating read while in San Francisco earlier this month and devoured the artwork and critical essays by Gayle Clemans on the flight back to DC. Features pieces by Maya Lin and Paula Scher previously mentioned here. Thanks Jag!]

Artists & designers using the map medium for experimental art & innovation http://su.pr/2sijN4

Republished from BrainPickings.

What tattoo art has to do with fashion, vintage atlases and Nazi concentration camps.

We’ve always been fascinated by maps — through various elements of design, from typography to color theory to data visualization, they brilliantly condense and capture complex notions about space, scale, topography, politics and more. But where things get most interesting is that elusive intersection of the traditional and the experimental, where artists explore the map medium as a conceptual tool of abstract representation. And that’s exactly what The Map of the Art, a fantastic Morning News piece by Katharine Harmon, examines.

Corriette Schoenaerts, ‘Europe,’ 2005

Schoenaerts, a conceptual photographer living in Amsterdam, constructs countries and continents out of clothing.

Qin Ga, ‘Site 22: Mao Zedong Temple,’ 2005

In 2002, China’s Long March Project embarked upon a ‘Walking Visual Display’ along the route of the 1934-1936 historic 6000-mile Long March, and Beijing-based artist Qin kept tracked the group’s route in a tattooed map on his back. Three years later, Qin continued the trek where the original marchers had left off, accompanied by a camera crew and a tattoo artist, who continually updated the map on Qin’s back.

Continue reading at BrainPickings . . .

All Aboard For NACIS Sacramento in October!

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

sacramentoThe program for the 2009 NACIS annual conference has been announced. The location this year is Sacramento, Calif., from Wednesday, October 7th to Saturday the 10th. I will be presenting Natural Earth Vector with Tom Patterson and crew at the Practical Cartography Day event before the main conference.

The North American Cartographic Information Society, founded in 1980, is an organization comprised of specialists from private, academic, and government organizations whose common interest lies in facilitating communication in the map information community.

Opening session speaker will be Michal Migurski, Stamen Design in San Francisco. Michal is Partner and Director of Technology Stamen, and maintains an active blog about mapping and design. Several Saturday field trips are available.

See the nation’s most spectacular scenery on the way to this year’s NACIS conference. Join Dennis McClendon and the rolling Geodweeb party train as it heads from Chicago to Sacramento. More info is available via the CartoTalk forum posting.

trainmap

Directional Signage and Maps in San Francisco

Friday, April 24th, 2009

Here are several pictures taken at the new California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and at SFO airport last week. The museum’s exhibits and aquarium make extensive use of maps and directional signage. They even feature an lenticular foil showing before and after glacier loss. The California Beef Council map was seen at the Fry’s parking lot in San Jose. The bathroom signage is from the SFO airport where they have both an in and an out for the restrooms :)

calacademyup

calacademydown

sfomensrestroomdirectionalsignage

calacademyglacierold

calacademyglaciernew

calbeefcouncilmaplicenseplate

calacademycalmap

calacademyafrica

calacademyafrica2

calacademyafrica3

calacademyafrica4

calacademyamazon

calacademygalapogos

Interactive San Francisco Airport Map (Kelso)

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

sfairport

[Editor's note: I happened on this interactive map from the San Francisco airport when I flew thru SFO this past weekend as I bid adieu to my California vacation. There is an airport overview and maps of each terminal. Gates, stores, food options, restrooms, and other features are located. Each feature is interactive with a tooltip and small description, including open hours for businesses, and full description in the bottom left corner. Category searches are available in the top left corner and the map will highlight with the appropriate location(s).]

Interact with the original at FlySFO . . .

sfairportsephora

Detail of map above shows result of a food and beverage category querry for the restraunt name.