Posts Tagged ‘shapefile’

E00Parser, an ActionScript 3 Parser for the Arc/Info Export Topological GIS Format (IndieMaps)

Monday, March 2nd, 2009

[Editor's note: Zach Johnson promo's his ActionScript 3 class for reading in .e00 GIS files to Flash. Useful for creating cartograms and other graphic representations reliant on topological relationships. Originally posted there Feb. 21, 2009.]

First off, why mess with such a retro format as Arc/Info Export (.e00)?– any code written for this ASCII file type in the last few years has been on how to go from e00 to pretty much anything (especially to the non-topological data format, the shapefile).

Put simply, topological information makes a lot of things possible for the intrepid ActionScripter.

Read more at IndieMaps . . .
Get the code . . .

KML to Shapefile File Conversion (Zonum)

Friday, December 12th, 2008

[Editor's note: Useful free tool for converting KML files to Shapefile for use in the GIS. Thanks Mary Kate!]

Republished from Zonum Solutions. Kml2shp file conversion

Need of transferring Google Earth Data to a GIS? Kml2shp transforms KML files into ESRI Shapefiles.

Download. Windows program. No Mac version.

The KML file could contain Points, Paths and Polygons. When creating SHP files the information is separated into thematic layers.

For each shapefile (shp), an attributes table (dbf) and index file (shx) are created.

The kml to shp conversion consists of three steps:

1) Open KML file
2) Choose Shape Type
3) Select output Shapefile name

Optionally, you can change from WGS84 to a local datum and from Lat/Lon to UTM.

Also, Kml2shp can export to AutoCAD (DXF) and GPS (GPX)

kml2Shp is a beta freeware tool. This program doesn’t need to be
installed, just unzip it and run it.

kml2shp.zip contains the executable file (kml2shp.exe) and some bpl files. If you receive a message error about missing bpl files, come back here and get them.

DOWNLOAD

ArcGIS 9.3 Now Exports Geo PDF Maps (ESRI)

Monday, October 20th, 2008

Adobe® Acrobat® and Adobe Reader® version 9 support a new version of PDF that allows for encoding of map coordinate system and georeference information inside the PDF file.

[Update 2010 August 13: To make this work in ArcMap 9.3 you need to apply the ArcGIS (Desktop, Engine, Server) 9.3 Map Export Patch. That installs two DLLs that allow the Export Map Georeference Information checkbox. Without that, you're maps might have layers, but no coordinate system.]

This news release was in the summer 2008 issue (read) of the Arc user magazine but it came up last week at NACIS. Why is this better than other PDF solutions like TerraGo? It is completely free to both the cartographer and map reader and requires basic Adobe Acrobat (no plugins to download). ESRI and Adobe collaborated for a year on these PDF geospatial capabilities enhancements.

It works on both Mac and PC while other solutions are PC only. It is not full featured, though feature attributes and coordinates are accessible in Acrobat. But nifty tidbit: with Acrobat Pro you can import supplementary geo data into an existing geo PDF, even if it is in a different projection, and it will overlay onto the map. Might turn out to be a quick and dirty reprojection trick for those without ArcMap.

Most information below directly from ESRI promotional material.

ArcGIS 9.3 has new and improved functionality for exporting maps to Adobe PDF including map layers and location information for end users with Adobe Acrobat 9 or Reader 9 software. These enhancements are available as a freely downloadable patch for ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Server, and ArcGIS Engine. This patch enables ArcGIS Desktop, Engine, and Server applications to export georeferenced PDF files.

When a georeferenced PDF is opened in a compatible viewer, such as Adobe Reader 9, the user can access geospatial functions like coordinate readout and find XY.  This patch enables ArcGIS Desktop, Engine, and Server applications to export georeferenced PDF files.

Check out this video demonstration from ESRI TV:

KML: Now An Open OGC Standard For Sharing GeoData

Wednesday, April 16th, 2008

(Reprinted from Google’s Lat-Long Blog, view here)

Google Earth and other similar tools have done much to bring mapping into the digital age. Nowadays we all take for granted that you can easily go online and map search results for pizza in your zip code or zoom into satellite imagery of a small town on the other side of the world.

However, the internet is about much more than just searching and viewing information. It’s also about publishing. It wouldn’t be what it is today without blogs, wikis, social networking sites, and other forms of user-generated content. The web is what makes all of this possible, and HTML is what makes the web possible — a standard format that enables any web browser to view any web page. HTML’s standardization was a very powerful thing. Rather than being locked up in a proprietary format, or only viewable using one specific vendor’s product, web pages can be viewed and shared without encumbrance, for free.

This brings me to today’s wonderful news: KML is now an international standard!

Continue reading at Google.com . . .

Zillow® Labs – Neighborhood Boundaries Shapefiles for Download

Tuesday, March 25th, 2008

zillow logo(Zillow.com via arcdigita.com) The Zillow data team has created a database of nearly 7,000 neighborhood boundaries in the largest cities in the U.S. And they’d like to share them with you! They’re sharing these neighborhoods under a Creative Commons license to allow people to use and contribute to their growing database.

Now comes the fine print: You are free to use the files in this database in applications as long as you attribute Zillow when you use it. You may also make your own changes to the database files and distribute them, as long as you provide them under the same kind of license and give Zillow attribution. The neighborhood shapes are available below, zipped up in the Arc Shapefile format.

The downloads are by state and available here:
http://www.zillow.com/labs/NeighborhoodBoundaries.htm

Flex Projector – Mashup your own map projection

Sunday, December 9th, 2007

Bernhard Jenny keeps busy over in Switzerland working for the Institute of Cartography, ETH Zurich. Bernie and I collaborated on Color Oracle, a software utility which helps designers create artwork that is more legible for color-impaired readers. Now he’s working on Flex Projector, a free, cross-platform application for creating custom world map projections (with Tom Patterson, US National Park Service). Tom presented Flex Projector at this year’s NACIS conference in St. Louis.

Flex Projector’s intuitive interface allows users to easily modify dozens of popular world map projections—the possibilities range from slight adjustments to making completely new projections and examine their accuracy and distortion. Flex Projector is intended as a tool for practicing mapmakers and students of cartography. The software is still in “alpha” but don’t let that fool you… it is a powerful, mature tool.

I’ve been helping out this week by converting Dick Furno’s excellent LoRes world dataset (nations, nation lines, continents, lakes, capitols, major rivers) from our custom Washington Post database to work in Flex Projector. Dick was the last projectionist at National Geographic and is now semi-retired from The Washington Post. He programmed Azimuth, a CAD plugin for mapping that is especially adept at automatically choosing the most appropriate projection for a map dataset and optimizing projection settings to minimize distortion. The Washington Post still uses Azimuth to rapidly create breaking news maps. ArcMap is just too cumbersome.

Bernie and Tom like the data so much it is now the default in the new version of Flex Projector, released this week. Dick’s low resolution world data will be available for download in shapefile format from the main Flex Projector website, too. Especially useful for creating maps at the continental or world scale at small sizes, even in ArcMap. Enjoy!

flex projector logo