Posts Tagged ‘tilecache’

Natural Earth Browser from Thematic Mapping

Monday, January 4th, 2010

[Editor's note: Bjorn over at his Thematic Mapping Blog has done up a Natural Earth tile set using open source tools. How have you been using Natural Earth?]

Excerpted from Thematic Mapping Blog.

My holiday project, apart from skiing, was to play with the new Natural Earth dataset. By combing raster and vector data you can make a variety of visually pleasing maps. You can use my Natural Earth Browser to study the great linework of Natural Earth.
Natural Earth Browser was created with a variety of open source tools. Map tiles from raster data was created with MapTiler and optimised with pngng. Map tiles from vector data was styled with Mapnik and pre-genereated with TileCache. The map interface is based on OpenLayers, Ext JS and GeoExt.
Continue reading at Thematic Mapping Blog . . .

Open Source GIS Stack (Mikel Maron)

Sunday, November 16th, 2008

[Editor's note: If you want to stay away from Google, Microsoft, and ESRI to get your interactive, online map on, here's how. Also check out this interesting PDF article on GeoDjango.]

Republished from Brainoff.com on Oct. 31st, 2008.

There’s a need for a good, high level description of the alternatives within in the “gently settling” stack of open source geoweb application development.

The OpenGeo Stack is the epitome of clarity, breaking down their tool set in a nice executive summary. But the OpenGeo stack only covers their tools, not all the available options. So I’m going to make a quick first pass of a high level overview. It’s useful for me, maybe for others. If you think I’ve done a poor job, help improve it in the comments, or on some wiki somewhere.

OpenGeo breaks things down into FrontEnd, Tiling, ApplicationFramework, Database. I’ll add Rendering, since in other tool sets this is split into different packages.

FrontEnd
the slippy map

* OpenLayers the Ajax gold standard
* ModestMaps for mind blowing Flash, ala Stamen
* Mapstraction don’t want to tax your mind? it looks just like the Google/Yahoo/Microsoft API

Tiling
be nice to your database or WMS and cache map images into tiles, just like Google and friends

* TileCache simple bit of python
* GeoWebCache same thing in Java
* mod_tile it’s kinda OpenStreetMap specific, but an apache module is a good idea too

Rendering
make pretty maps

* Mapnik looks beautiful. getting somewhat less painful to install.
* Mapserver does it all. also a pain to configure. looking better.
* GeoServer

ApplicationFramework
where the the main logic of the app goes. MVC. CRUD. etc.

* GeoDjango making great progress on a complete package.
* GeoRails more a bunch of plugins than a package, but definitely useable
* GeoServer the standard for open geo standards. Java.

Database

* Postgres + PostGIS
* MySQL sure, it has spatial extensions too. just not as fast or fully implemented as PostGIS

Random notes, other good sources

Architect your interfaces on Geo RESTful services. Andrew breaks down the formats and approaches for Neogeography and the GeoWeb in this presentation and book. For Ajax smooveness, use jQuery or prototype. Paul Ramsey has a good deep overview of open source GIS. Mecklenburg County GIS is a nice example of an instance of the stack.

There really is a need for a new book on this stuff, the O’Reilly trio of paper geo titles are great but out of date, and the landscape of osgeowebappdev is stabilising. Of course, no one wants to write it.

Take Control of Your Maps (A List Apart)

Monday, May 12th, 2008

(Reprinted from A List Apart. Thanks Peter! Paul Smith is is a co-founder and developer at EveryBlock, see this blog post. He has been creating sites and applications on the Web since 1994. He’s also co-creator of the Election Day Advent Calendar, and a founding member of Friends of the Bloomingdale Trail. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.)

by PAUL SMITH

map a list apart

We live in the era of Google Maps. What started off as an impressive refresh of Mapquest-style maps now fuels web mashups. With APIs official and unofficial, Google Maps is simple enough for front-end designers to embed and for back-end programmers to target. Along the way to becoming nearly ubiquitous, it has played a major role in the “democratization of mapping.” For the practical developer who wants to add geospatial information to a site or application, the Google Maps API has been an easy call.

But, perhaps no longer. As websites mature and the demand for geographic applications grow, the old mashup arrangement is starting to chafe. Mapping components are more and more vital, and so we demand greater control, expressiveness, and functionality from them.

Fortunately, as in many aspects of internet technology, an ecology of open source online mapping tools has emerged alongside the market leader. It is now possible to replicate Google Maps’ functionality with open source software and produce high-quality mapping applications tailored to our design goals. The question becomes, then, how?

Continue reading how to create a custom web map . . .

– And skipping right to the conclusion –

Conclusion

One of the great things about online mapping is that it straddles the line between the artistry and communication of cartography, and the precision and programmability of GIS. You can produce great-looking maps that are highly functional and integrate smoothly with your application. It’s my hope that this article demystified the web map stack and will get you thinking about how you can take control of the maps in your site.

RESOURCES/EXTERNAL LINKS

There are many open source projects related to online mapping and GIS. This article touched on these:

In addition, just to name a few: Modest Maps and Mapstraction are browser UI libraries similar to OpenLayers, in Flash and JavaScript, respectively. GeoServer and MapServer are alternatives to Mapnik in the map rendering department. You owe it to yourself to investigate these alternatives, as they each excel in different ways and one may meet your needs better than the others.