Posts Tagged ‘times’

Tag Cloud: Twitter Chatter During the Super Bowl (NY Times)

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

[Editor’s note: The Times produced a fantastic interactive time-based tag-cloud-on-a-map showing twitter chatter across the US keyed to major events in the Super Bowl game between the Steelers and Cardinals. Several thematic channels are available. Kudos to Matthew Bloch and Shan Carter. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from The New York Times.
Orig pub date: Feb. 2, 2009.

As the Steelers and Cardinals battled on the field, Twitter users across the nation pecked out a steady stream of “tweets.” The map shows the location and frequency of commonly used words in Super Bowl related messages.

Interact with the original Flash version at New York Times . . .

The Last Minutes of Flight 3407 (NY Times)

Monday, February 16th, 2009

[Editor's note: The New York Times has a good panel-based interactive following the descent and ultimate crash of Flight 3407 before it crashed on landing approach into the Buffalo Niagara International Airport last week. A touch of animation between each time slice adds a nice flourish. Steadily increasing map detail and  finally a photo realistic shot of the neighborhood reinforce the scale change and make the lack of scale bars less glaring.]

Republished from the New York Times.
Originally published: February 13, 2009.
Graphic by Xaquín G.V., Ford Fessenden, Joe Burgess, Graham Roberts

Screenshots below. View interactive version to see the transitions between each panel.

Sources: Pictometry, LiveATC.net, FlightAware, FlightView, Bombardier

No Snickering: That Road Sign Means Something Else (NY Times)

Tuesday, January 27th, 2009

The “Butt” in this road, in South Yorkshire, probably refers to a container for collecting water.

[Editor’s note: Amusing article about “off color” place names in Britain that have a long history. Thanks April!]

Republished from The New York Times. By SARAH LYALL. Published: January 22, 2009.

CRAPSTONE, England — When ordering things by telephone, Stewart Pearce tends to take a proactive approach to the inevitable question “What is your address?”

He lays it out straight, so there is no room for unpleasant confusion. “I say, ‘It’s spelled “crap,” as in crap,’ ” said Mr. Pearce, 61, who has lived in Crapstone, a one-shop country village in Devon, for decades.

Disappointingly, Mr. Pearce has so far been unable to parlay such delicate encounters into material gain, as a neighbor once did.

“Crapstone,” the neighbor said forthrightly, Mr. Pearce related, whereupon the person on the other end of the telephone repeated it to his co-workers and burst out laughing. “They said, ‘Oh, wethought it didn’t really exist,’ ” Mr. Pearce said, “and then they gave him a free something.”

In the scale of embarrassing place names, Crapstone ranks pretty high. But Britain is full of them. Some are mostly amusing, like Ugley, Essex; East Breast, in western Scotland; North Piddle, in Worcestershire; and Spanker Lane, in Derbyshire.

Others evoke images that may conflict with residents’ efforts to appear dignified when, for example, applying for jobs.

These include Crotch Crescent, Oxford; Titty Ho, Northamptonshire; Wetwang, East Yorkshire; Slutshole Lane, Norfolk; and Thong, Kent. And, in a country that delights in lavatory humor, particularly if the word “bottom” is involved, there is Pratts Bottom, in Kent, doubly cursed because “prat” is slang for buffoon.

As for Penistone, a thriving South Yorkshire town, just stop that sophomoric snickering.

“It’s pronounced ‘PENNIS-tun,’ ” Fiona Moran, manager of the Old Vicarage Hotel in Penistone, said over the telephone, rather sharply. When forced to spell her address for outsiders, she uses misdirection, separating the tricky section into two blameless parts: “p-e-n” — pause — “i-s-t-o-n-e.”

Several months ago, Lewes District Council in East Sussex tried to address the problem of inadvertent place-name titillation by saying that “street names which could give offense” would no longer be allowed on new roads.

“Avoid aesthetically unsuitable names,” like Gaswork Road, the council decreed. Also, avoid “names capable of deliberate misinterpretation,” like Hoare Road, Typple Avenue, Quare Street and Corfe Close.

(What is wrong with Corfe Close, you might ask? The guidelines mention the hypothetical residents of No. 4, with their unfortunate hypothetical address, “4 Corfe Close.” To find the naughty meaning, you have to repeat the first two words rapidly many times, preferably in the presence of your fifth-grade classmates.)

The council explained that it was only following national guidelines and that it did not intend to change any existing lewd names.

Still, news of the revised policy raised an outcry.

“Sniggering at double entendres is a loved and time-honored tradition in this country,” Carol Midgley wrote in The Times of London. Ed Hurst, a co-author, with Rob Bailey, of “Rude Britain” and “Rude UK,” which list arguably offensive place names — some so arguably offensive that, unfortunately, they cannot be printed here — said that many such communities were established hundreds of years ago and that their names were not rude at the time.

“Place names and street names are full of history and culture, and it’s only because language has evolved over the centuries that they’ve wound up sounding rude,” Mr. Hurst said in an interview.

Mr. Bailey, who grew up on Tumbledown Dick Road in Oxfordshire, and Mr. Hurst got the idea for the books when they read about a couple who bought a house on Butt Hole Road, in South Yorkshire.

The name most likely has to do with the spot’s historic function as a source of water, a water butt being a container for collecting water. But it proved to be prohibitively hilarious.

“If they ordered a pizza, the pizza company wouldn’t deliver it, because they thought it was a made-up name,” Mr. Hurst said. “People would stand in front of the sign, pull down their trousers and take pictures of each other’s naked buttocks.”

The couple moved away.

The people in Crapstone have not had similar problems, although their sign is periodically stolen by word-loving merrymakers. And their village became a stock joke a few years ago, when a television ad featuring a prone-to-swearing soccer player named Vinnie Jones showed Mr. Jones’s car breaking down just under the Crapstone sign.

In the commercial, Mr. Jones tries to alert the towing company to his location while covering the sign and trying not to say “crap” in front of his young daughter.

The consensus in the village is that there is a perfectly innocent reason for the name “Crapstone,” though it is unclear what that is. Theories put forth by various residents the other day included “place of the rocks,” “a kind of twisting of the original word,” “something to do with the soil” and “something to do with Sir Francis Drake,” who lived nearby.

Jacqui Anderson, a doctor in Crapstone who used to live in a village called Horrabridge, which has its own issues, said that she no longer thought about the “crap” in “Crapstone.”

Still, when strangers ask where she’s from, she admitted, “I just say I live near Plymouth.”

Picturing the Inauguration: The Readers’ Album (NY Times)

Monday, January 26th, 2009

[Editor's note: Several hundred readers at the New York Times site submitted photos to a live photo wall commemorating last Tuesday's historic inauguration of Barack Obama as the United State's 44th president.]

Republished from The New York Times. January 18, 2009. Reader submitted.

NYTimes.com readers sent in their photographs from Washington and around the world. Images are organized in the order they were received.

Screenshots below. View interactive version.

Jon Huang, Ben Koski, Andrew Kueneman, Thomas Lin, Gabriel Dance, Whitney Dangerfield Elisabeth Goodridge, John McGrath, Jacob Harris, Tyson Evans, Alan McLean, and Hamilton Boardman/The New York Times

Parsing the Bailout (Wash Post + NY Times)

Monday, December 1st, 2008

[Editor’s note: Two visual approaches to graphing out the Federal Government’s expanding effort to “invest” in the economy during the financial crises and prevent another “Great Depression”. One from the Washington Post uses a tree map (1 | 2 | 3) approach to show all the individual parts of the bailout in relative size to each other in 1 single block. The New York Times offering uses an illustrated narrative form where each part is still scaled relative to the others but it is shown in isolation with explanation text. The two graphics are not directly comparable as they use different grouping categories. Please note the Post graphic was 3/4 of a page while I think the Times graphic was smaller.

The NY Times used a similar tree mapping approach in their recent All of Inflation’s Little Parts interactive. I’m quite taken with this approach! It reminds me of cartograms but focusing on the data topology instead of being held captive by the “shape” of countries. Countries are to most people nominal lists and when physical geography (arrangement, proximity, etc) does not influence pattern, I think this is a better approach.]

Graphics below republished from Washington Post and New York Times (story | graphic), both from 26 November 2008. Top graphic (graduated circle “bubbles”) is NY Times.

Washington Post
By Todd Lindeman and Brenna Maloney.
View larger (or click on graphic).

New York Times
By staff artist.
View larger (or click on graphic).

A House of Glass (NY Times)

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

[Editor’s note: This interactive in a panel based narrative highlighting the transformation of a landmark in New York City. Touches of animation and good story telling. Republished from the New York Times on Oct. 16th, 2008. Thanks Christina!]

The cascading public staircase that covers the new TKTS discount booth in Duffy Square is made almost entirely of structural-strength glass: walls, beams, treads and risers. (Related Article)

View full sized original at NYTimes.com . . .

Source: Nicholas Leahy, Perkins Eastman, Theater Development Fund

Mika Gröndahl and Xaquín G.V. / The New York Times; Photographs by Fred R. Conrad, Richard Perry, Michael Evans / The New York Times, Associated Press, Times Square Alliance