Posts Tagged ‘touch screen’

Comparison of Touch Screen Sensor Accuracy (Apple Insider)

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

diytouchscreenanalysis3

[Editor's note: This graphic reminds me of lens distortion matrix analysis in my remote sensing class back in university. Not all sensors are made equal and pictures and sensors just capture a representation of reality, not the real thing.]

Republished from AppleInsider. January 11, 2010.

Touchscreen analysis shows iPhone accuracy lead over Droid

A test comparing the accuracy and sensitivity of smartphone touchscreens across various makers gave the iPhone top marks ahead of HTC’s Droid Eris and the Google-branded Nexus One, and much better results than the Motorola Droid.

The results, published by MOTO labs, noted that the company (which has no relation to Motorola) “has years of experience developing products that use capacitive touch, and we’ve had the opportunity to test many of the latest devices. Our conclusion: All touchscreens are not created not equal.”

Continue reading at AppleInsider . . .

Apple looking to patent iPhone-friendly glove? (iPodNN)

Sunday, January 4th, 2009

[Editor's note: Living in a colder clime, I'm often frustrated that I cannot use the iPhone's touch screen while wearing gloves. If I tilt my finger just right thru the fabric and press hard I can barely get the phone to unlock and place a call. The alternative is frost bite. This patent application demonstrates one solution.]

Republished from iPodNN.

Apple may be exploring the idea of gloves more friendly to touchscreens, an application published by the US Patent and Trademark Office reveals. A problem common to iPhone and iPod users in colder areas, such as Canada and the northern US, is that they must wear gloves when going outside. Because Apple handhelds use capacitive touchscreens however, it may be difficult or impossible for the electrical signals from a person’s fingers to pass through glove fabric.

Apple’s proposed glove design would include inner and outer layers, the former covering the palm and at least one finger. The inner layer would also emulate properties of human skin, namely its electrical resistance. To control a touchscreen, holes in the outer layer would allow one or several fingers to protrude; to keep hands as warm as possible, the holes would be lined with elastic rings and/or some sort of cap, for when fingers are safely tucked back inside.