Posts Tagged ‘track’

Water Measured From the Sky: Satellites Track Land’s Consumption (Wash Post)

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Republished from The Washington Post.

In Idaho, scientists are using remote imaging to study evapotranspiration, the loss of water to the atmosphere by evaporation from soil and water, and by transpiration from plants.

Water management is serious business in the American West, where precipitation is scarce, irrigated agriculture is a major industry, new housing subdivisions spread across arid landscapes and water rights are allocated in a complicated seniority system.

Related story from The Washington Post ยป

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POTUS Tracker: Analyzing Obama’s Schedule (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, August 24th, 2009

[Editor’s note: I’m proud to present POTUS Tracker: Analyzing Obama’s schedule, a new tool from The Washington Post that keeps tabs on President Obama, whom he’s meeting with (over 3,000 people so far), and what they’re discussing (with 17 issue categories and 13 event type codes). It is the second in our Obama Accountability series. The first, Head Count: Tracking Obama’s Appointments, has enjoyed a million visits since launch in April 2009. Data for this project available in RSS and JSON data dump.

I did the Flash interactive (using the Flare visualization package for the opening treemap isue view) and coordinated the project with Karen Yourish. Madonna Lebling and Ryan O’Neil are the genius behind the schedule information and online data presentation. POTUS Tracker was featured on CNN’s State of the Nation (YouTube video) on Sunday, 23 August. With the project out of the way, I can turn my attention back to Natural Earth Vector.]

(Screenshot below) Interact with POTUS Tracker at The Washington Post . . .

potus_tracker_screenshot

CREDIT: Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso, Madonna Lebling, Karen Yourish, Ryan O’Neil, Wilson Andrews, Jacqueline Kazil, Todd Lindeman, Lucy Shackelford, Paul Volpe

New Programs Put Crime Stats on the Map (Wall Street Journal)

Thursday, June 4th, 2009

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[Editor’s note: Instead of screen scrapping police logs printed in community papers, web mappers are partnering directly with city police departments to get timely, accurate reports up online in map form. Thanks Yifang!]

Republished from the Wall Street Journal.
June 3, 2009. By BOBBY WHITE

When a burglar broke into a home on the outskirts of Riverdale Park, Md., last month, some locals quickly received an email alert about the incident. Once police confirmed the crime on the scene, they followed
up with a more thorough email disclosing the time, location and type of crime.

The alert is part of a crime-information service that the Riverdale Park police department provides its residents about illegal activity in their neighborhoods. “It helps us keep the public informed,” says Teresa Chambers, police chief of Riverdale Park, a suburb of Washington, D.C. “It’s also a way for us to solicit help [from residents] in solving some of these crimes.”

Across the country, Americans can increasingly track crime trends block by block as more police departments contract with Internet-based crime-mapping services. Since 2007, more than 800 police departments have begun working with Web sites like CrimeMapping.com, CrimeReports.com and EveryBlock.com. The services take live feeds from police record-keeping systems and automatically post the data on their sites.

Police say they use the sites to help change citizens’ behavior toward crime and encourage dialogue with communities so that more people might offer tips or leads. Some of the sites have crime-report blogs that examine activity in different locales. They also allow residents to offer tips and report crimes under way.

Police have traditionally depended on media reports and community meetings to inform the public about neighborhood crime. Many departments have been reluctant to share too much information with the public out of concern it could be used as a political tool, says Thomas Casady, police chief of Lincoln, Neb. But the rise of Web services that publish records online has forced some of the departments to reconsider. Some of these sites operate independently of the police department, putting pressure on police to participate, Mr. Casady says.

Continue reading at the Wall Street Journal . . .

rubiTrack 1.5 Adds New Charts, Heart Rate Import (MacNN)

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009

[Editor’s note: This Mac-only application provides GPS track library and display functions for the recreation or fitness folks not entranced by the Nike+ solution. Includes iPhone companion app (pro | lite) or use with standard GPS device export files. Desktop app features include calendar view of activity, charting of pace, speed, elevation, and map overlays with automatic labels for distance and time intervals.]

Republished from Mac News Network.
March 9th, 2009.

Toolsfactory has released an update to its GPS-enabled activity-tracking application for the Mac, rubiTrack 1.5. The program is designed to help log and organize outdoor activities, while enabling users to store information that can be displayed in detailed maps. The update offers several new features such as power charts, time-driven diagrams and direct sync with WinTec WBT201. Users can now import TCX files, heart rate information, cadence and power data from compatible devices.

The latest version also provides enhanced import capabilities for indoor activities lacking GPS data. The company also addressed a number of bugs with the update.

RubiTrack is compatible with Mac OS X 10.5 or later and can be purchased directly from the company for $40.