Posts Tagged ‘twp’

Name that Body of Water: East Sea or Sea of Japan?

Monday, August 17th, 2009

Last week an unnamed group (commentary elsewhere) ran this full page ad (below) in The Washington Post disagreeing with the use of Sea of Japan over East Sea for the body of water between the Korean peninsula and Japan. The series of ads has also appeared in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. The group also has informational pamphlets on several other contested issues.

In the US English, the conventional, Federal Board of Geographic Names toponymn for this body of water is “Sea of Japan”, and the conventional alternative name is also “East Sea” (Tong-hae romanized from Korean native script). When space is available, the placename is shown as “Sea of Japan (East Sea)”. As with any placename, alternatives are dropped under space constraints (such as with a 1 column map).

When the 8th Edition National Geographic Atlas of the World was published earlier this decade, a similar campaign (though more threatening) was run about the Persian Gulf (Arabian Gulf).

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IBM Tag Cloud Map Ad (Wash Post)

Friday, August 7th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Yesterday's post on Travel Bermuda reminds me of this IBM ad from back in June picking up of buzz words in the U.S. capital around the Obama administration. The tags animate into the shape of a map showing the world on it's continents on a globe.]

Republished from The Washington Post on 16 June 2009 (in the web edition).

Travel to Bermuda Ad (Wash Post)

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

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[Editor's note: This fanciful bit of advertising art pleases my (left or right?) eye. The Bermuda ad campaign is customized for several metropolitan areas.]

Republished from The Washington Post (an ad in the print edition on 2 August 2009).

Money Talks During Health Reform (Wash Post)

Monday, July 27th, 2009

[Editor's note: Tree map charting.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
July 21, 2009. Related article: GOP Focuses Effort To Kill Health Bills

Nearly 60 percent of the health-care industry’s campaign contributions to members of Congress have gone to House and Senate leaders and lawmakers sitting on one of the five committees drafting legislation to reform the nation’s health system.

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On the Map: Five Major North Korean Prison Camps (Wash Post)

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive map from The Washington Post examines political prison camps were opponents or fallen favorites of the regime in Pyongyang are forced to do slave labour. Great use of Google Earth to generate the 3d scene, combined with Natural Scene Designer. Kudos to Kat and Laris for a great presentation.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

North Korea has operated political prison camps for more than 50 years, twice as long as the Gulag in the former Soviet Union. People suspected of opposing the government are forced to do slave labor in the camps, which hold an estimated 200,000 prisoners. Great use of Google Earth to generate the 3d scene, combined with Natural Scene Designer. North Korea’s government says the camps don’t exist, but high-resolution satellite images show otherwise.

Interact with the original at Washington Post . . .

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Map: Where has Obama been in Washington? Where do you want him to go? (Wash Post)

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

[Editor’s note: This interactive Google mashup builds off some code I programmed last year. I still like how the map snaps back to the original position after the info window closes. Kudos to Gene Thorp!]

Republished from The Washington Post.
Related articles:

According to whom you ask, President Obama has either embraced the D.C. area more than any other recent president or is falling well short of the full Washingtonian-status they had hoped the city-loving First Family might embrace. This map highlights most of the president’s stops in and around Washington to date, as well as some suggestions for the Obamas’ future dining from Post restaurant critic Tom Sietsema. Click on an icon to learn more about the president’s visit or Sietsema’s recommendation. And please use the comments box to suggest eateries, date-night venues, cultural events and other local outings for the president. We’ll add the most promising recommendations to the map on Monday.

Screenshot below. Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

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Map: Network of Special Lanes (Wash Post)

Thursday, July 16th, 2009

[Editor's note: Great map by Laris Karklis.]

Republished from The Washington Post. By Ashley Halsey III.
Related article: A Fast Track To Bus

A proposal that would use $300 million of federal stimulus money to optimize bus service is under review today. Enhancements to bus corridors and a reconfiguration of K Street are among the central elements of proposed improvements.

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North Korea Issues Heated Warning to South (Wash Post)

Friday, July 10th, 2009

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[Editor's note: The Egypt-Sudan boundary post reminds me that North Korea says it will no longer respect the legal status of the five islands South Korea administers west of the South's mainland allocated during the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War. So many small details.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Blaine Harden. Wednesday, May 27, 2009

TOKYO, May 27 — North Korea announced Wednesday that it is no longer bound by the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War, the latest and most profound diplomatic aftershock from the country’s latest nuclear test two days earlier.

North Korea also warned that it would respond “with a powerful military strike” should its ships be stopped by international forces trying to stop the export of missiles and weapons of mass destruction.

The twin declarations, delivered by the country’s state news agency, followed South Korea’s announcement Tuesday that it would join the navies that will stop and inspect suspicious ships at sea. North Korea has repeatedly said that such participation would be a “declaration of war.”

They followed other developments in North Korea that have added to the sense of jangled nerves across northeast Asia since Monday’s underground nuclear test.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Using Data Visualization as a Reporting Tool Can Reveal Story’s Shape (Poynter)

Friday, June 26th, 2009

[Editor’s note: My colleague Sarah Cohen at The Washington Post was recently interviewed by Poynter about creating data visualizations to help readers understand and reporters research complicated stories. Sarah is on her way to a big new gig at Duke University.]

Republished from Poynter.
By Steve Myers at 6:12 AM on Apr. 14, 2009

Readers have come to rely on interactive presentations to understand complicated stories, using them to zoom in on periods of time and highlight areas of interest. Yet to investigate these stories, reporters often create what amounts to handcrafted investigative art: flow charts with circles and arrows, maps shaded with highlighters and stuck with pins.

More and more, though, some reporters are using data visualization tools to find the story hidden in the data. Those tools help them discover patterns and focus their reporting on particular places and times. Many of the presentations, which can have rough interfaces or less-than-sleek design, are never published.

At the recent National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting (NICAR) conference, Sarah Cohen, database editor for The Washington Post‘s investigative team — and recently named professor of computational journalism at Duke University — showed how reporters can use interactive graphics for their exploratory reporting. [PDF]

Cohen described this approach to me via e-mail. Here’s an edited version of our exchange.

Steve Myers: How would creating a digital, visual representation of data help a reporter? What does it tell you that you wouldn’t be able to find otherwise?

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Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen: The same way that visualizations and graphics help readers cut through a lot of clutter and display dense information in an efficient way. The most common things that early visualizations help with are place and time — two of the most important elements in reporting a complex story. Those two things are really hard to see in text. They’re really, really hard to see in combination. So the graphics can show you where to go to find your subjects or where to go to find the most typical subjects. They can also show you when the story you are trying to find peaked. Put them together, and you can start finding the very best examples for your story.

That’s pretty general, so let me give you a couple of examples. During a story on disaster payments in the farm subsidy system, we wanted to make sure that we went to places that had received the payments year after year after year. Using a database, we could find farms that had received multiple payments pretty easily. But looking at repeated images of density maps that I made of the payments, it was really obvious where to go — specific areas of North Dakota and Kansas.

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Sarah Cohen/Poynter illustration
Cohen used density maps to figure out what areas of the country had received disaster payments year after year.


In another example, we were working last year on a story on practices used by landlords to empty their buildings, partly in order to avoid strict laws on condo conversions (visualizations: research version, published version. We knew one neighborhood of the city was Ground Zero — an area called Columbia Heights, in Northwest D.C. But making an interactive map with a slider that showed the timing, we could see that it was moving into other areas of the city, especially in Southeast. We could also quickly see that the most affluent areas of the city had none of them.

Continue reading at Poynter . . .

Top 10 Choke Points (Washington Post)

Thursday, June 25th, 2009

[Editor's note: This map is an example of direct annotation of a schematic flow diagram with real world map coordinates. Better than a list, better than interactive roll overs. All in a static graphic!]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Despite an overall decrease in traffic congestion, there are still spots where traffic regularly comes to a crawl during peak periods. Here are the 10 worst traffic choke points in the region. These areas are characterized by severe congestion and extended delays – car speed ranged from 10 to 20 miles per hour, with 115 to 100 cars per mile, per lane.

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