Posts Tagged ‘typography’

The Map as Art: Contemporary Artist Explore Cartographically (Katharine Harmon)

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

[Editor’s note: I picked up this fascinating read while in San Francisco earlier this month and devoured the artwork and critical essays by Gayle Clemans on the flight back to DC. Features pieces by Maya Lin and Paula Scher previously mentioned here. Thanks Jag!]

Artists & designers using the map medium for experimental art & innovation http://su.pr/2sijN4

Republished from BrainPickings.

What tattoo art has to do with fashion, vintage atlases and Nazi concentration camps.

We’ve always been fascinated by maps — through various elements of design, from typography to color theory to data visualization, they brilliantly condense and capture complex notions about space, scale, topography, politics and more. But where things get most interesting is that elusive intersection of the traditional and the experimental, where artists explore the map medium as a conceptual tool of abstract representation. And that’s exactly what The Map of the Art, a fantastic Morning News piece by Katharine Harmon, examines.

Corriette Schoenaerts, ‘Europe,’ 2005

Schoenaerts, a conceptual photographer living in Amsterdam, constructs countries and continents out of clothing.

Qin Ga, ‘Site 22: Mao Zedong Temple,’ 2005

In 2002, China’s Long March Project embarked upon a ‘Walking Visual Display’ along the route of the 1934-1936 historic 6000-mile Long March, and Beijing-based artist Qin kept tracked the group’s route in a tattooed map on his back. Three years later, Qin continued the trek where the original marchers had left off, accompanied by a camera crew and a tattoo artist, who continually updated the map on Qin’s back.

Continue reading at BrainPickings . . .

Advanced Text Layout Framework for Flash Open-Sourced (Adobe)

Thursday, July 23rd, 2009

advancedflashtextengine1

[Editor's note: Finally, Adobe's purchase of Macromedia is bearing fruit! The fine-control that Illustrator and InDesign have over typography (text layout) is now available in Flash and Flex as an ActionScript 3.0 framework. There are even a few controls I wish would make it back to Illustrator, like where in the text container the text starts from (not always the top-left hand corner) and allowing images and graphics to be embedded in the text frame, ala Freehand. Also note the Photoshop style numerical control scrubbers!]

Republished from Adobe Labs.

Welcome to the beta release of the Text Layout Framework for Adobe® Flash® Player 10 and Adobe AIR® 1.5. The Text Layout Framework is an extensible library, built on the new text engine in Adobe Flash Player 10, which delivers advanced, easy-to-integrate typographic and text layout features for rich, sophisticated and innovative typography on the web. The framework is designed to be used with Adobe Flash CS4 Professional or Adobe Flex®, and is already included in the next version of Flex, code named Gumbo. Developers can use or extend existing components, or use the framework to create their own text components. Source code and component library for TLF are now available as open source at no charge under the Mozilla Public License at www.opensource.adobe.com.

Together with the new text engine in Flash Player 10 and AIR 1.5, the Text Layout Framework delivers multi-lingual, print-quality typography for the web, including support for:

  • Bidirectional text, vertical text and over 30 writing systems including Arabic, Hebrew, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Lao, the major writing systems of India, and others
  • Selection, editing and flowing text across multiple columns and linked containers, and around inline images
  • Vertical text, Tate-Chu-Yoko (horizontal within vertical text) and justifier for East Asian typography
  • Rich typographical controls, including kerning, ligatures, typographic case, digit case, digit width and discretionary hyphens
  • Cut, copy, paste, undo and standard keyboard and mouse gestures for editing
  • Rich developer APIs to manipulate text content, layout, markup and create custom text components.

For a complete list of features and more information regarding this beta, please see the release notes. Please help us ensure that the final release of the Text Layout Framework will be of the highest quality by installing and using this beta version and sending us your feedback on the Text Layout Framework forum.

Open Source

The Text Layout Framework is now an open source project.

Illustrator Plugin: Live Pen

Monday, March 16th, 2009

[Editor's note: This plugin looks useful to illustrators wanting a more free form calligraphic touch for their artwork. Plugin allows variable width strokes along existing artwork objects in Adobe Illustrator. PC-only at present. If you've used it, please leave a comment on this post. Screenshots below detail work flow.]

Republished from Zero-one.
Visit their site to get demo version of plugin.

Typography and calligraphy rediscovery!

Simple plug-in help you get rich typography and calligraphy in a few click. Now available for Adobe Illustrator CS, CS2 and CS3. [Editor's note: will prob. work in CS4, too.]

Live Pen features include:

  • Digital natural drawing
  • Moving Pen Anchor
  • Simple adding or deleting Pen Anchor
  • Pens library
  • Minimal anchor after expanding
  • Smooth integration

Create your first calligraphy stroke with Live Pen

World-New Features

Digital Natural Drawing

Moving Pen Anchor

Simple Adding or Deleting Pen Anchor

Pens Library

Typographic World Map Desktop Wallpaper (Vlad Studio)

Monday, December 15th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Get this awesome desktop wallpapers for your computer or mobile device. Thanks Curt!]

Republished from Vlad Studio.

[Vlad] loves drawing world maps! This time, shape of each country is represented by its name.

Download these and others from Vlad Studio in multiple sizes.

Desktop

Mobile (iPhone, etc)

Students Dig Deep For Words’ Origins (Wash Post)

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

[Editor’s note: Nifty typography (text word art) graphic in the shape of a plant with roots reaching down into the earth. Good use of color to establish figure-ground. Illustration for article about the study of the origin and evolution of words.] View larger (PDF).

Republished from The Washington Post.

CLASSES APART. Article by Michael Birnbaum. Graphic by Todd Lindeman. Nov. 24th, 2008.

First in a series of occasional short takes on unusual courses in local schools.

For a few hours every other afternoon, Latin and Greek roots rain on Phil Rosenthal’s etymology class at Park View High School in Sterling. Etymology — the study of the origin and evolution of words — might be considered the domain of tweedy types who reek of pipe smoke. But Rosenthal tries to give his 20-some students a sense of the stories and shades behind the words they use every day.

“Kids see a word that to them is foreign, and they run away from it,” Rosenthal says. He started the class with a group of other Loudoun County teachers in 1990, and it remains one of the few of its kind in the country.

On a day focused on Latin words including arena and sinister, Rosenthal talked about the twists words take as they make their way into English. Arena, for example, means “a sandy place” in Latin. Sand was scattered in the center of Roman stadiums where gladiators fought. Sinister derives from Latin for “left,” with the implication that lefties were suspicious.

Rosenthal said some students take the semester-long elective because they are curious about words. Some liked other classes he taught. Others might want to improve their verbal scores on standardized tests. And a few “are actually lost,” he said. “They wanted to study bugs and thought it would be a cool thing to take an entomology class.” (That was a mistake shared by a Loudoun school official when a reporter made an
inquiry.)

An understanding of the complexity of language might give a leg up to students entering college. Students in Dennis Baron’s English classes at the University of Illinois “tend to know almost nothing” about word origins. “They don’t see roots and those sorts of things,” said Baron, a professor of English and linguistics.

Although he wondered whether etymology might be better as a component of a larger high school class on linguistics, Baron said he thought it was “a way of getting at high school English without the overemphasis on formal grammatical stuff” in many secondary curriculums.

That seems to be borne out in the class. This week, students are starting a unit on the influence of mythology on the language. They’ll give presentations about Sisyphus and Narcissus, who lend their names to “Sisyphean” and “narcissistic.” Etymology “just brings all this general knowledge together,” Rosenthal said.

The World, Justified (Strange Maps)

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

[Editor’s note: Fun take on what the world would look like if all the land masses were jammed together and justified like text in a paragraph: left, center, and right. Thanks Noel!]

Republished from Strange Maps.

Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain are a pair of young Brazilian artists, working in their home country and in France. Some of their work explores fonts and maps. Typography meets cartography in this little work, entitled ‘The World, Justified’.

It shows the world we live in as only one of four possibilities, the others being a left-aligned, centred and right-aligned world. Our world is a justified one, i.e. aligned with both left and right margins.

One could make all sorts of geophilosophical comments about these alternate possibilities. Or about the fact that the world we live in is neither left, right nor centre, but ‘justified’. Could it really be that, as Voltaire’s Candide asserted, tout va pour le mieux dans le meilleur des mondes possibles (’Everything is for the best in the best of possible worlds’)?

Many thanks to Eric Angelini for sending in this map, found in its original context at the aforementioned artists’ website, detanicolain.com (click on the red line).