Posts Tagged ‘video’

Sometimes We Get A Little Frustrated With ArcGIS! (NWGeoSpatial)

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

[Editor’s note: I’m on xmas break so no posts this week but wanted to share this hilarious video on YouTube poking fun at ESRI and changing core technology snafus corrupting the core enterprise geodatabase. The video production is pretty slick, uploaded by lukewrogers. Thanks Tom!]

Adolf Hitler Furious at ESRI Software
The tide of the war hinges on getting ArcGIS to union a few datasets in the Geodatabase and things aren’t going well…

Two new iPhone apps: USA Today and AccuWeather (MacNN)

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008

[Editor's note: Two new free mass media apps for the iPhone this week from USA Today and Accuweather.]

Republished from MacNN (1 | 2).

USA Today

USA Today is joining other publications in producing its owndedicated iPhone app, the national newspaper has announced. The app attempts to replicate the look of the paper, and provides access to stories, photos, weather forecasts and reader polls. Stories are divided into News, Money, Sports, Life, Tech and Travel categories; articles can be shared with other people via e-mail, Twitter or text messaging.

Sports figures can also be viewed through a separate tab, and as with AccuWeather’s app, people can access GPS-based weather forecasts when using an iPhone. The Pictures tab presents a gallery of images from each section of the paper, and again allows people to share content with others, though only via e-mail. The USA Today app is a free download from the App Store, but supported by advertising.

AccuWeather premieres GPS-enabled iPhone app

Weather forecaster AccuWeather has released its first, self-named application for the iPhone. As with most weather apps the software concentrates on providing a five-day forecast, with highs and lows as well as cloud conditions. The AccuWeather app is tied into the iPhone’s GPS receiver however, and uses this to automatically determine which forecasts to show.

Current conditions can be viewed in the form of text or radar and satellite views, and users also have access to health information such as air quality, UV levels and flu prevalence. Graphs present the probability of bad weather for the next eight hours, and a video library provides summaries of both weather news and forecasts. The app lastly permits setting Weather Alarms, which warn users whenever levels of fog, rain, snow, ice, wind or lightning reach a certain threshold. AccuWeather is a free download from the App Store.

Interface design and the iPhone (Tufte)

Sunday, June 29th, 2008

From edwardtufte.com. View original. Thanks Curt!

The iPhone platform elegantly solves the design problem of small screens by greatly
intensifying the information resolution of each displayed page. Small screens, as on
traditional cell phones, show very little information per screen, which in turn leads
to deep hierarchies of stacked-up thin information–too often leaving users with
“Where am I?” puzzles. Better to have users looking over material adjacent in space
rather than stacked in time.

To do so requires increasing the information resolution of the screen by the hardware
(higher resolution screens) and by screen design (eliminating screen-hogging
computer administrative debris, and distributing information adjacent in space).

This video shows some of the resolution-enhancing methods of the iPhone, along
with a few places for improvements in resolution.

(This is a 56mb file; it might take a while to load.
The video is essential to the essay as is the still-land material below.)

… View video … (opens new window with original Tufte post)

In 1994-1995 I [Tufte] designed (while consulting for IBM) screen mock-ups for navigating
through the National Gallery via information kiosks. (The National Gallery had the
good sense not to adopt the proposal.) For several years these screen designs were
handouts in the one-day course in my discussion of interface design, and were then
published in my book Visual Explanations (1997).

The design ideas here include high-resolution touch-screens; minimizing computer
admin debris; spatial distribution of information rather than temporal stacking;
complete integration of text, images, and live video; a flat non-hierarchical
interface; and replacing spacious icons with tight words. The metaphor for the
interface is the information. Thus the iPhone got it mostly right.

Here are pages 146-150 from Visual Explanations (1997):

Continue reading at Tufte.com . . .