Posts Tagged ‘wash post’

Meet Alberto Cuadra, new artist at The Washington Post

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

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[Editor’s note: I’ll update on Where 2.0 soon, but first I have a new colleague at The Washington Post. Alberto Cuadra is an impressive 3d artist coming to us from the Houston Chronicle. More from the announcement below and check out his portfolio. I have also turned off the daily Twitter blog cross-posts, you can follow me at @kelsosCorner for more frequent updates and previews.]

Alberto will be taking on a new kind of role for Washington Post graphics. He will be tasked with reporting and telling visual stories about physical D.C. That means anything from a tour of the Capitol Visitors Center to a rendering of what the new White Flint is going to look like. He will work closely with the Local visual content team.

Alberto is uniquely qualified for this new role. He started his career as a reporter at Spain’s El Mundo and switched to graphics after the art department admired the sketches he delivered with graphics requests. He has since become one of the best 3D modelers in print journalism.

Check out Alberto’s portfolio . . .

On Guam, planned Marine base raises anger, infrastructure concerns (Wash Post)

Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010

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[Editor's note: Map shows location of Guam in the Pacific Ocean on a globe, by one of my colleagues at The Washington Post. Guam is it's own "country" but under United States sovereignty. Things can get complicated, as the story explains.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Blaine Harden. Monday, March 22, 2010

HAGATNA, GUAM — This remote Pacific island is home to U.S. citizens who are fervent supporters of the military, as measured by their record of fighting and dying in America’s recent wars.

But they are angry about a major military buildup here, which the government of Guam and many residents say is being grossly underfunded. They fear that the construction of a new Marine Corps base will overwhelm the island’s already inadequate water and sewage systems, as well as its port, power grid, hospital, highways and social services.

“Our nation knows how to find us when it comes to war and fighting for war,” said Michael W. Cruz, lieutenant governor of Guam and an Army National Guard colonel who recently returned from a four-month tour as a surgeon in Afghanistan. “But when it comes to war preparations — which is what the military buildup essentially is — nobody seems to know where Guam is.”

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Stewart L. Udall, 90, interior secretary was guardian of America’s wild places (Wash Post)

Monday, March 22nd, 2010

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[Editor’s note: We continue to expand Natural Earth coverage this week by adding U.S. National Parks. Do you have a few hours to spare? We’d like to add National Forests, large state parks, and wilderness areas.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Matt Schudel. Sunday, March 21, 2010

Stewart L. Udall, who as secretary of the interior in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations launched a series of far-reaching conservation reforms that made him one of the most significant figures in protecting America’s natural environment, died March 20 at his home in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 90 and had complications from a recent fall.

Mr. Udall had served three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat from Arizona when President John F. Kennedy tapped him for the top job at the Interior Department. Mr. Udall initiated the first White House conference on conservation since the administration of Theodore Roosevelt and stated his credo at the beginning of his tenure: “Nature will take precedence over the needs of the modern man.”

He brought conservation and environmental concerns into the national consciousness and was the guiding force behind landmark legislation that preserved millions of acres of land, expanded the national park system and protected water and land from pollution. From the Cape Cod seashore in Massachusetts to the untamed wilds of Alaska, Mr. Udall left a monumental legacy as a guardian of America’s natural beauty.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Climate change’s impact on forests being measured via expanding tree trunks (Wash Post)

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

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[Editor's note: Humorous but scientific take on "tree huggers" in the U.S. mid-Atlantic. Catching up on some old clippings as I roll back into DC.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

By David A. Fahrenthold. Saturday, February 20, 2010

Jess Parker hugs trees.

In the woods of Anne Arundel County, he throws his arms around tulip poplars, oaks and American beeches, and holds them so tightly that his cheek presses into their bark. This is not some hiker on a lark: anybody, hopped up on campfire coffee and exercise endorphins, might hug a tree once.

This is science. Parker has done it about 50,000 times.

Parker, a forest ecologist at the Smithsonian Institution, has spent the past 22 years on a research project so repetitive, so time-consuming, that it impresses even researchers with the patience to count tree rings. Since 1987, he and a group of volunteers have embraced thousands of trees, slipped a tape measure behind them, and wrapped it around to measure the trees’ girth.

This year, after about 250,000 hugs between them, the work paid off.

Parker’s data, which showed the trunks gradually fattening over time, indicated that many of the trees were growing two to four times faster than expected. That raised questions about climate change’s impact on the age-old rhythms of U.S. forests.

It might also raise questions about Parker and members of his team, who say they enjoyed almost every minute of it.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Cartography Design Annual #2 is Now Available

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

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[Editor’s note: Looking for map design inspiration? This second volume, now available from Lulu for $39.95 is brought to us by Nick Springer and a forward by Tom Patterson. Look for two Washington Post maps, one by yours truly.]

Republished from CartographyDesignAnnual.com.
By Nick Springer on December 11th, 2009

Showcasing the Art of Map Making

The Cartography Design Annual is a collection of maps from some of the top cartographers in the world capturing the beauty of mapping. Compiled and edited by Nick Springer, the Cartography Design Annual collects a select group of maps published in the calendar year 2008. The maps cover a broad spectrum of cartographic styles: 3D birds-eye views, travel maps, historic-style maps, mountain maps, and many more. The Annual is published by Springer Cartographics LLC, with support from NACIS (the North American Cartographic Information Society). The book, in beautiful full-color with an overview and detail view of each map, is both a showcase for cartographers and a interesting collection for anyone who loves maps.

The first Cartography Design Annual was received with great praise and excitement from the cartographic community and so the series continues with this second edition. With a foreword by Tom Patterson of the U.S. National Park Service in the second edition, the release Cartography Design Annual series is becoming an anticipated event for cartographers.

The book contains 30 maps from cartographers in the United States, Canada, Sweden, Norway, and Poland. This is book #2 in what will be an annual series.

The editor, Nick Springer is also the founder of Cartotalk.com, the most popular online community for cartographers worldwide. “The first edition of the Cartography Design Annual was a bit of an experiment, but all of the great feedback I received form cartographers proved that there is a need for this kind of showcase.” said Mr. Springer. “I hope this year’s edition will gain even broader exposure outside the world of cartographers.”

Mr. Springer is the Founder and President of Springer Cartographics LLC in Crosswicks, NJ and has worked for Microsoft Corporation as a Product Designer creating mapping applications and also designs software for GPS navigation systems. He studied Geography and Cartography at Syracuse University.

Buy the book from Lulu . . .

My street has been plowed! (MyMaps and Wash Post)

Monday, February 8th, 2010

My colleage Wilson setup a open-to-everyone Google MyMaps project for folks to note which streets in DC have been plowed. Had to hack the embed with a network link via Google Maps to get all the locations to plot on one map (MyMap usually wants to separate blocks of markers into separate pages and maps).

Check it out at The Washington Post . . .

Map of big snow storm in DC (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, February 8th, 2010

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I’m still digging out from the big storm this weekend in Washington, DC. I received 24″ at my house, ranged from 14″ to over 30″ in the metro area with heaviest around Columbia, Maryland. I worked during the storm and Laris and I tallied the NWS weather spotter reports of snowfall and used the GIS to krig the a map of average depth from about 50 points (which had to be filtered to remove expired values). Then used Illustrator’s Live Trace functionality to vectorize. Preview above (for the local home page promo which didn’t have room for legend, so directly labeled the contours), full graphic below with explainer of how the storm happened (with Laura and Larry).

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Taking apart the federal budget (Wash Post)

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

[Editor’s note: Great storytelling and numerical analysis of Obama’s 2010 federal budget from The Washington Post. The introductory charting is on a single axis making it easy to compare where the money comes from and where it goes. The next tabs dig deeper, focusing on historical trends (multiple axis) and a look at the surplus/deficit. Kudos to Karen, Laura, Wilson, Jackie! Brand X uses a Tree Map visualization instead.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Feb. 2, 2010.

Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

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As temperatures fall, the ground rises (Wash Post)

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

[Editor's note: My colleague Patterson Clark has a new science column in the redesigned print edition that features a weekly graphic. Last week it was on frost heaves using cross section profiles in 3 panels.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Weather conditions have been favorable for the formation of frost heaves: Heavy rainfall and melting snow from the last week of December, followed by a long bout of freezing weather, created dynamic subsurface freezing that lifted some exposed soils up onto a bed of sharp ice crystals. (Looks spongy; feels crunchy underfoot.).

Frost heaves can damage soil structures, making soils more prone to erosion. Heaves can also lift overwintering plants out of the ground, breaking roots and exposing the roots to freezing temperatures. Heaves can also shift, and possibly damage, fence posts, sidewalks or other structures set into the top couple of feet of earth.

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Graphic: TSA tries to assuage privacy concerns about full-body scans (Wash Post)

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

[Editor’s note: Props to Bonnie and Laura for this The Washington Post graphic illustrating how the TSA plans to use full-body scans to improve security at airports. Includes actual millimeter wave scans of a man. Related story.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Security experts say high-tech imagers that detect objects beneath our clothes are vital to safe air travel. Opponents say they are intrusive and too revealing. For now, the process is an optional alternative to a traditional pat-down at airports across the country, including Reagan National and BWI. These are the two types of full-body imaging technology in use or on the way:

View larger version at The Washington Post . . .