Posts Tagged ‘wash post’

Wasting Away: The Squandering of D.C.’s AIDS Dollars (Wash Post)

Monday, October 19th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Great interactive map from Kat Downs and Mary Kate Cannistra at The Washington Post for our 3-part investigative series on the District's widespread waste and mismanagement to overwhelm the city's AIDS services. Map allows several ways for the user to group (all/active) and filter (amount of award, year of award, and funding source) their analysis of groups receiving city money and calls out the 6 groups highlighted in the series. A popup menu allows the user to jump alphabetically to the group name they already know rather than wading through the map.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Between 2004 and 2008, the D.C. Department of Health awarded approximately $80 million in grants to about 90 specialized AIDS groups, which along with medical clinics make up the front lines in the District’s fight against the disease. But while some provided a critically needed lifeline to the sick, others were wracked by questionable spending, practices and services. During those five years, one in three dollars earmarked for local AIDS groups went to these troubled programs, a total of more than $25 million.

SOURCE: D.C. Department of Health HIV/AIDS Administration, D.C. Department of Health fact sheet, 2009
GRAPHIC: Kat Downs, Meg Smith, Debbie Cenziper, Lauren Keane and Mary Kate Cannistra

(screenshot above) Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

A Complicated Dig: Dulles Airport MetroRail Extension (Wash Post)

Monday, October 19th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Explanatory graphic from this weekend's Washington Post illustrates how "Building a Metrorail Tunnel at Tysons Corner Takes Brute Force Applied With a Deft Touch" in five panels. Click image above for larger version.]

18 Feet Done, Many More to Go

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Lisa Rein. Graphic by Todd Lindeman and Brenna Maloney.
Sunday, October 18, 2009

Cars crawl down Route 123 in the afternoon rush. Forty feet below them, giant machines and men wearing yellow hard hats begin their advance under Tysons Corner to bring Northern Virginia commuters their holy grail: a new subway.

At $85 million, the half-mile tunnel is the costliest and most complex engineering feat of the 23-mile Metro extension to Dulles International Airport. It will be built while 3,500 cars and trucks cross its path each hour, while the Courtyard Marriott serves breakfast and guests swim in its pool, while hands are shaken over aerospace deals at BAE Systems. It will carry on under two miles of tangled utility lines that convey to Tysons everything from electricity to some of the nation’s most secret intelligence. As of Friday, after three months of digging and prep work, workers had hollowed out the half-mile tunnel’s first 18 feet.

One wrong move and the foundation of an office garage could settle, a top-secret communique through the U.S. Army’s microwave tower right above the tunnel’s path by Clyde’s restaurant could be lost.

“You’ve got gas lines, water lines, drainage lines, electrical duct banks, black wires and a lot more in a busy urban area, which makes for a very challenging tunneling environment,” says Dominic Cerulli, the engineer for Bechtel in charge of building the tunnel. He guides visitors on the first tour of the project on a recent weekday. “I’ve been on jobs where you’re tunneling out in the middle of a parking lot. Here you’ve got to keep businesses up and running.”

When it opens in 2013, the first leg of the rail line will extend 11.5 miles from East Falls Church through Tysons to Wiehle Avenue in Reston. The tunnel, scheduled for completion in late 2011, will connect two of the four Metro stations in Tysons. Cerulli likes to say his project is the toughest part of the line. “But don’t say I said that, because the guideway is also complicated,” he jokes, referring to the elevated section, still 18 months off, that will carry the trains 55 feet above the Capital Beltway.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Water Measured From the Sky: Satellites Track Land’s Consumption (Wash Post)

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Republished from The Washington Post.

In Idaho, scientists are using remote imaging to study evapotranspiration, the loss of water to the atmosphere by evaporation from soil and water, and by transpiration from plants.

Water management is serious business in the American West, where precipitation is scarce, irrigated agriculture is a major industry, new housing subdivisions spread across arid landscapes and water rights are allocated in a complicated seniority system.

Related story from The Washington Post ยป

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Day of the Gaucho Waning in Argentina (Wash Post)

Friday, September 11th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Interesting geography piece in yesterday's Washington Post about how Argentina is producing less free-range beef in favor of US-style feedlots. The days of the cowboy are indeed numbered.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Juan Forero. Thursday, September 10, 2009

Cattle Being Moved Off Plains and Into U.S.-Style Feedlots

MAGDALENA, Argentina — Cattle once ruled the seemingly endless grasslands here, delivering decades of prosperity for Argentina and producing a brand familiar to the world — natural, grass-fed beef.

But a quiet revolution has arrived on the famously fertile pampa, a swath of plains bigger than Texas.

Instead of roaming freely and eating to their hearts’ content, a growing number of Argentine cattle are spending a third of their lives in U.S.-style feedlots. There, crammed in muddy corrals, they are pumped with antibiotics and fed mounds of protein-rich grain, which fattens them up fast but hardly conjures up the romantic image of the Argentine cowboy, the iconic gaucho, lassoing cattle on the high plains.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Old Troubles Threaten Again in Bosnia (Wash Post)

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Before working on Natural Earth Vector, I had no idea Bosnia was composed into two countries awkwardly joined into one state. As the following article from this Sunday's Washington Post explains, the war that ended 14 years ago did little to solve the conflict. Map by Gene Thorp using Landscan population estimates at 1km grid resolution, mashed up with ethnic distribution map by administrative district.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
By Craig Whitlock. Sunday, August 23, 2009

14 Years After War, Leaders Suggest U.S. Should Step In to Rewrite Treaty

SARAJEVO, Bosnia — Fourteen years after the United States and NATO intervened to stop war and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, the old divisions and hatreds are again gripping this Balkan country.

In June, the international envoy who oversees the rebuilding of Bosnia invoked emergency powers that he said were necessary to hold the country together. Although U.S. and European officials have been trying to get Bosnia to stand on its own feet for years, many Bosnian leaders say the only thing that can permanently fix their gridlocked government is for Washington to intervene — again — and rewrite the treaty that ended the war in 1995.

Continue reading at The Washington Post . . .

Being the Fastest Is Not Enough (InfoGraphicsNews)

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

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[Editor's note: You'll start seeing more mashups on The Washington Post site the next month. Staff are being trained to use a new mashup maker tool I made that churns out decent maps in 5 minutes flat. Just like in print, normal rules about accuracy in reporting apply. The bottom line, don't show more location detail than you know to be true, as this blog post from InfoGraphicsNews illustrates. Thanks Laris!]

Republished from the InfoGraphicsNews blog.
Original on 12/04/2008.

Yesterday, the terrosrist group ETA killed another person in Spain. In this cases, as most of the cases, internet media have the initative. The first idea is to place the new. Shw where it took place. But the problem is that in this kind of news all the information is changing all the time during the first hour, and the data are not accurate. Yesterday, we only knew that Ignacio Uria was killed while he was going to his favourite restaurant, Kiruri. We didn’t even knew if he came form his house or form his job.

The punch line:

None of those that placed the killing on a exact place were right.

Some rectified later, others didn’t even change it. Being the fastest can’t go before telling the truth. On reconstructions many editors use to say that “the reader know this is not exactly the truth, that we’re just guessing”. I don’t want the reader to not trust us. I prefer to have a reader who really think that when we say something we know it and we’re not guessing.
These are screenshots from some spanish websites two hours after the agencies gave the news:

Continue to view screenshots at InfoGraphicsNews blog . . .

Name that Body of Water: East Sea or Sea of Japan?

Monday, August 17th, 2009

Last week an unnamed group (commentary elsewhere) ran this full page ad (below) in The Washington Post disagreeing with the use of Sea of Japan over East Sea for the body of water between the Korean peninsula and Japan. The series of ads has also appeared in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. The group also has informational pamphlets on several other contested issues.

In the US English, the conventional, Federal Board of Geographic Names toponymn for this body of water is “Sea of Japan”, and the conventional alternative name is also “East Sea” (Tong-hae romanized from Korean native script). When space is available, the placename is shown as “Sea of Japan (East Sea)”. As with any placename, alternatives are dropped under space constraints (such as with a 1 column map).

When the 8th Edition National Geographic Atlas of the World was published earlier this decade, a similar campaign (though more threatening) was run about the Persian Gulf (Arabian Gulf).

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IBM Tag Cloud Map Ad (Wash Post)

Friday, August 7th, 2009

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[Editor's note: Yesterday's post on Travel Bermuda reminds me of this IBM ad from back in June picking up of buzz words in the U.S. capital around the Obama administration. The tags animate into the shape of a map showing the world on it's continents on a globe.]

Republished from The Washington Post on 16 June 2009 (in the web edition).

Travel to Bermuda Ad (Wash Post)

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

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[Editor's note: This fanciful bit of advertising art pleases my (left or right?) eye. The Bermuda ad campaign is customized for several metropolitan areas.]

Republished from The Washington Post (an ad in the print edition on 2 August 2009).

Money Talks During Health Reform (Wash Post)

Monday, July 27th, 2009

[Editor's note: Tree map charting.]

Republished from The Washington Post.
July 21, 2009. Related article: GOP Focuses Effort To Kill Health Bills

Nearly 60 percent of the health-care industry’s campaign contributions to members of Congress have gone to House and Senate leaders and lawmakers sitting on one of the five committees drafting legislation to reform the nation’s health system.

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