Posts Tagged ‘zoom’

This Map Zooms In As You Unfold (Wired)

Sunday, January 24th, 2010

[Editor's note: Seen over at Gizmodo. Thanks Curt!]

Pinch to zoom? Nah. Try unfold to zoom. The Map2, a “zoomable map on paper,” is a clever invention that packs more detailed maps underneath its folds.

Continue reading at Wired . . .

Unemployment rate by county (Kelso via Wash Post)

Monday, December 7th, 2009

[Editor’s note: Kudos to Kat Downs for wiring up this interactive, zoomable map of the United States showing unemployment rate by county. There’s a slider to see data back in time. I did the base map using my map generalization skills honed on Natural Earth. Using data that is appropriately generalized for the display scale cuts down on file size and reduces lag before data display.]

Republished from The Washington Post. Dec. 3, 2009

unemploymentmap
SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics; GRAPHIC: Kat Downs, Mary Kate Cannistra and Nathaniel Vaughn Kelso – The Washington Post, December 3, 2009

INTERACTIVE MAP: Impacted U.S. GM Plants (Kelso via Wash Post)

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

[Editor's note: This interactive from Tuesday shows plants set to close under G.M.'s restructuring plan in the context of all of G.M.'s manufacturing facilities. Checkboxes allow different types of facilities to be filtered and zoom presets make it easier to zoom into clusters of markers. A reset button allows the display to return to it's original state. A table below the map contains some of the same information.]

Republished from The Washington Post.

Under GM’s restructuring plan, the automakers’s manufacturing facilities will be reduced to 33 by 2012. Three distribution centers will also be eliminated.

Click on map icons for plant name, location, number of employees and more. Screenshot below.

Interact with original version at The Washington Post . . .

gm_plant_closures_map

MAP: Track Swine Flu Cases (Kelso via Wash Post)

Thursday, April 30th, 2009

[Editor's note: This is my mashup for The Washington Post tracking the H1N1 swine flu outbreak. It is custom built using the Google Maps for Flash API. Reporting is by Washington Post staff and is updated several times each day. Zoom in and out of the map to see more detail and different symbolization approaches.]

Screenshots below:

Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

Use our interactive mashup to track the distribution of swine flu (H1N1) cases around the world. Click on the map markers to learn more about cases at each location. 

SOURCES: Staff reports; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and World Health Organization. Interactive by Nathaniel V. Kelso; Research by Madonna Lebling, Robert Thomason, Mary Kate Cannistra and April Umminger – The Washington Post. First published April 27, 2009 at 10 p.m.

World Map of Swine Flu Outbreak

World Map of Swine Flu Outbreak

World Map of Swine Flu Outbreak

Interact with the original at The Washington Post . . .

A Year of Parking Tickets (NY Times)

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

[Editor's note: This Google Maps mashup inside Flash shows color coded streets in New York City based on the number of parking violations. Preset zooms are provided to certain hot spots and but users can still auto-zoom to their own street addresses.]

Republished from the New York Times.
By Matthew Bloch and Amanda Cox.
Orig. pub. date: Nov. 26, 2008.

New York City agencies issued 9,955,441 parking tickets from July 2007 to June 2008.

Interact with the orignal Flash graphic at New York Times . . .

Map panning and zooming methods in Flash (Cartogrammar)

Sunday, July 13th, 2008

Reprinted from Cartogrammar’s blog (original post from June 29):

Following last week’s post on losing context with interactive maps, I wanted to consider the different methods of navigating an interactive map (i.e., panning and zooming) and how they might affect that issue, and while I’m at it look at other aspects of these methods, too.

A great place to start is the 2005 paper by my now co-mappers Mark Harrower and Ben Sheelsey called Designing Better Map Interfaces: A Framework for Panning and Zooming.* (A PDF is available on Professor Harrower’s web site.) In that paper they discuss criteria for evaluating panning and zooming methods, namely functionality and efficiency, and then go on to present and evaluate nine common methods of panning and zooming. With respect to my previous post, it is a lack of what they call “local-global orientation cues” that can lead to the “navigational trauma” of losing context.

Below are small demos of eight of the nine methods listed by Harrower and Sheesley, along with their thoughts and mine on functionality and efficiency as well as a word or two on the prior subject of maintaining context. (For simplicity I’ve left zooming out of most of those demos where it would be accomplished via separate interface widgets.) 

 

 

 Known sometimes as “slippy maps” (from OpenStreetMap?), maps with this kind of panning interaction are the standard these days in the big online mapping services from Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, etc.

Pros: No pesky tools or interface to deal with, and the action is natural and mimics real life manipulation of tangible objects.

Cons: High mouse mileage—you’ve got to move your mouse every bit as far as you want the map to move.

Context: There are no inherent orientation cues, so with this method alone you’d have to mentally keep track of the map’s movements. There is, however, an advantage of methods that directly jump from place to place.

Continue reading at Cartogrammar to see more examples . . .